Last10K.com

Seneca Foods Corp (SENEA) SEC Filing 10-K Annual Report for the fiscal year ending Thursday, March 31, 2022

SEC Filings

SENEA Annual Reports

Seneca Foods Corp

CIK: 88948 Ticker: SENEA

Exhibit 99.1

 

 

 

ex_383490img001.jpg

 

 

Seneca Foods Reports Sales and Earnings for the Quarter and Twelve Months Ended March 31, 2022

 

MARION, N.Y. June 10, 2022 -- Seneca Foods Corporation (NASDAQ: SENEA, SENEB) today announced financial results for the fourth quarter and twelve months ended March 31, 2022.

 

Executive Summary (vs. year-ago, year-to-date results):

 

 

Net sales for the twelve months ended March 31, 2022 totaled $1,385.3 million as compared to $1,467.6 million for the twelve months ended March 31, 2021. Of the $82.3 million year-over-year decrease in net sales, $71.9 million resulted from the divesture of the prepared foods business in fiscal year 2021. Excluding this divesture the remaining decrease was primarily due to lower sales volume of $93.0 million partially offset by higher selling prices/improved sales mix of $82.6 million.

 

 

Gross margin as a percentage of net sales for the twelve months ended March 31, 2022 was 10.7% as compared to 15.8% for the twelve months ended March 31, 2021.

 

 

Net earnings for the twelve months ended March 31, 2022 were $51.0 million or $5.79 per diluted share as compared to $126.1 million or $13.72 per diluted share for the twelve months ended March 31, 2021.

 

 

Adjusted net earnings for the twelve months ended March 31, 2022 were $84.6 million or $9.60 per diluted share as compared to $95.4 million or $10.38 per diluted share for the twelve months ended March 31, 2021.

 

“Despite persistent and historic inflation and resulting higher costs leading to significant non cash LIFO impacts on reported earnings as well as an additional non cash impairment for our remaining investment in the hemp business, our operating results continue to be very strong”, said Paul Palmby, President and Chief Executive Officer of Seneca Foods. “Further, I could not be prouder of how our employees and management team have responded to unprecedented challenges ranging from the pandemic to supply chain and inflation pressures.”

 

Executive Summary (vs. year-ago, fourth quarter results):

 

 

Net sales for the fourth quarter of fiscal 2022 totaled $332.4 million as compared to $304.8 million in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2021.

 

 

Gross margin as a percentage of net sales for the fourth quarter was 8.0% in fiscal 2022 as compared to 18.7% in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2021.

 

 

Net earnings for the fourth quarter of fiscal 2022 were $6.6 million or $0.77 per diluted share as compared to $14.8 million or $1.62 per diluted share in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2021.

 

About Seneca Foods Corporation

 

Seneca Foods is one of North America’s leading providers of packaged fruits and vegetables, with facilities located throughout the United States. Its high quality products are primarily sourced from over 1,400 American farms and are distributed to over 90 countries. Seneca holds a large share of the retail private label, food service, restaurant chains, international, contracting packaging, industrial, chips and cherry products.  Products are also sold under the highly regarded brands of Libby’s®, Aunt Nellie’s®, Green Valley®, CherryMan®, READ®, and Seneca labels, including Seneca snack chips.  Seneca’s common stock is traded on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbols “SENEA” and “SENEB”. SENEA is included in the S&P SmallCap 600, Russell 2000 and Russell 3000 indices.

 

 

The following information was filed by Seneca Foods Corp (SENEA) on Friday, June 10, 2022 as an 8K 2.02 statement, which is an earnings press release pertaining to results of operations and financial condition. It may be helpful to assess the quality of management by comparing the information in the press release to the information in the accompanying 10-K Annual Report statement of earnings and operation as management may choose to highlight particular information in the press release.
false 0000088948 Plante Moran, P.C. Southfield, Michigan 0000088948 2022-03-31 2022-03-31 0000088948 senea:CommonStockClassA25ParCustomMember 2022-03-31 2022-03-31 0000088948 senea:CommonStockClassB25ParCustomMember 2022-03-31 2022-03-31 0000088948 2021-10-01 0000088948 senea:CommonStockClassA25ParCustomMember 2022-05-24 0000088948 senea:CommonStockClassB25ParCustomMember 2022-05-24
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D. C. 20549
 
FORM 10-K
(Mark one)
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022
 
OR
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from _____ to _____
 
Commission File Number 0-01989
 
Seneca Foods Corporation
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
New York
16-0733425
     (State or other jurisdiction of         
  (I. R. S. Employer
incorporation or organization)
  Identification No.)
 
3736 South Main Street, Marion, New York
14505  
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (315) 926-8100
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each Class Trading Symbol Name of Exchange on 
Which Registered
Common Stock Class A, $.25 Par  SENEA NASDAQ Global Select Market
Common Stock Class B, $.25 Par  SENEB  NASDAQ Global Select Market
                                                      
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (315) 926-8100
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐ No ☑
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐ No ☑
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☑ No ☐
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☑ No ☐
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," "smaller reporting company" and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer ☐         Accelerated filer ☑         Non-accelerated filer ☐         Smaller reporting company ☑         Emerging growth company ☐
 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report. ☑
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No ☑
 
The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non affiliates of the Registrant as of October 1, 2021, the last business day of the Registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, was $354,877,691 (based on the closing share price per market reports generated from the NASDAQ Global Select Market System on October 1, 2021).
 
As of May 24, 2022, there were 6,467,697 shares of Class A common stock and 1,709,930 shares of Class B common stock outstanding.
 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE:
 
Portions of the registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement for the 2022 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held hereafter, and the Annual Report to Shareholders of Seneca Foods Corporation for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022 (the “Annual Report”), included as Exhibit 13 to this Form 10-K, are incorporated by reference in Parts I, II, III, and IV hereof.
 
 
SENECA FOODS CORPORATION
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2022
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
     
PART I.
 
Pages
     
Item 1.
2-5
Item 1A.
6-12
Item 1B.
12
Item 2.
13
Item 3.
13
Item 4.
13
     
PART II.
   
Item 5. 14
Item 6.
14
Item 7. 14
Item 7A.
14
Item 8.
14
Item 9. 14
Item 9A.
15
Item 9B.
15
     
PART III.
   
Item 10.
16
Item 11.
16
Item 12.
16
Item 13.
16
Item 14.
16
     
PART IV.
   
Item 15.
17
Item 16.
18
     
SIGNATURES
 
19
 
 
Forward-Looking Statements
 
This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains “forward-looking statements” as that term is used in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the fact that they address future events, developments, and results and do not relate strictly to historical facts. Any statements contained herein that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements include, without limitation, any statement that may predict, forecast, indicate, or imply future results, performance, or achievements, and may contain the words "will," "anticipate," "estimate," "expect," "project," "intend," "plan," "believe," "seeks," "should," "likely," "targets," "may", "can" and variations thereof and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed. We believe important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations include, but are not limited to, the following:
 
 
the effects of rising costs and availability of raw fruit and vegetables, steel, ingredients, packaging, other raw materials, distribution and labor;
 
crude oil prices and their impact on distribution, packaging and energy costs;
 
an overall labor shortage, ability to retain a sufficient seasonal workforce, lack of skilled labor, labor inflation or increased turnover impacting our ability to recruit and retain employees;
 
climate and weather affecting growing conditions and crop yields;
 
our ability to successfully implement sales price increases and cost saving measures to offset cost increases;
 
the loss of significant customers or a substantial reduction in orders from these customers;
 
effectiveness of our marketing and trade promotion programs;
 
competition, changes in consumer preferences, demand for our products and local economic and market conditions;
 
the impact of a pandemic on our business, suppliers, customers, consumers and employees;
 
unanticipated expenses, including, without limitation, litigation or legal settlement expenses;
 
product liability claims;
 
the anticipated needs for, and the availability of, cash;
 
the availability of financing;
 
leverage and the ability to service and reduce debt;
 
foreign currency exchange and interest rate fluctuations;
 
the risks associated with the expansion of our business;
 
the ability to successfully integrate acquisitions into our operations;
 
our ability to protect information systems against, or effectively respond to, a cybersecurity incident or other disruption;
 
other factors that affect the food industry generally, including:
 
recalls if products become adulterated or misbranded, liability if product consumption causes injury, ingredient disclosure and labeling laws and regulations and the possibility that consumers could lose confidence in the safety and quality of certain food products;
 
competitors’ pricing practices and promotional spending levels;
 
fluctuations in the level of our customers’ inventories and credit and other business risks related to our customers operating in a challenging economic and competitive environment; and
 
the risks associated with third-party suppliers, including the risk that any failure by one or more of our third-party suppliers to comply with food safety or other laws and regulations may disrupt our supply of raw materials or certain finished goods products or injure our reputation; and
 
changes in, or the failure or inability to comply with, U.S., foreign and local governmental regulations, including environmental and health and safety regulations.
 
Any of these factors, as well as such other factors as discussed in (1) Part I, Item 1A., “Risk Factors” of this Form 10-K, (2) Part II, Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and (3) in our other periodic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), could cause our actual results to differ materially from our anticipated results. The information provided in this Form 10-K is based upon the facts and circumstances known as of the date of this report, and any forward-looking statements made by us in this Form 10-K speak only as of the date on which they are made. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update these forward-looking statements after the date of this Form 10-K to reflect events or circumstances after such date, or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.
 
 
PART I
 
Item 1. Business
 
History and Development of Seneca Foods Corporation
 
Seneca Foods Corporation (“Seneca” or the “Company”) was founded in 1949 and has evolved through internal growth and strategic acquisitions into a leading provider of packaged fruits and vegetables, with 26 facilities located throughout the United States. The facilities are comprised of plants for packaging, can manufacuting, seed production, a farming operation and a logistical support network. The Company also maintains warehouses which are generally located adjacent to its packaging plants. The Company is incorporated in New York with its headquarters located at 3736 South Main Street, Marion, New York and its telephone number is (315) 926-8100. Its high quality products are primarily sourced from approximately 1,400 American farms. The Company’s product offerings include canned, frozen and bottled produce, and snack chips. Its products are sold under private label as well as national and regional brands that the Company owns or licenses, including Seneca®, Libby’s®, Aunt Nellie’s®, Cherryman®, Green Valley® and READ®. The Company’s fruits and vegetables are sold nationwide by major grocery outlets, including supermarkets, mass merchandisers, limited assortment stores, club stores and dollar stores. The Company also sells its products to foodservice distributors, restaurants chains, industrial markets, other food processors, export customers in over 90 countries and federal, state and local governments for school and other food programs. Additionally, the Company packs canned and frozen vegetables under contract packing agreements.
 
The Company pursues acquisitions when they are strategic and financially additive and meet its overall business needs. In 73 years of operation, the Company has made over 50 strategic acquisitions, investments and alliances that have expanded its leadership in the packaged fruit and vegetable industry. The table below includes some of the acquisitions and divestitures that have been completed in recent years:
 
Date
 
Significant Event
March 2021
 
Acquisition of a processing facility in Berlin, Wisconsin for $7.1 million to aid the Company’s frozen business by expanding freezing capability and adding frozen celery production to the core fruit and vegetable business.
     
December 2020
 
Divestiture of the prepared foods business, resulting in a gain of $34.8 million. The nature of the prepared foods business was not central to Seneca’s primary business and the sale allowed for the continued focus and investment in the Company’s core fruit and vegetable business.
     
November 2020
 
Executed an agreement with a co-pack customer to process canned vegetables on a contractual basis, and as part of that arrangment, acquired a plant in Cambria, Wisconsin. As an additional part of the arragement, Seneca acquired two already closed facilities and the equipment therein which was relocated and utilized by existing Seneca facilities in order to improve efficiencies or expand production capacities. Any equipment that was unable to be utilized was disposed of in fiscal year 2021. The idle facilities were acquired with no plans of operation, one of which was sold during fiscal year 2022 and the remaining facility is expected be sold in fiscal year 2023.
     
October 2019
 
The Company ceased production at its fruit processing plant in Sunnyside, Washington but continued to store, case and label products at this facility until late in fiscal year 2020.  In February 2020, the Company invested approximately $10 million and contributed the Sunnyside facility to acquire a 49% stake in CraftAg, LLC, a newly formed company which processed hemp. During fiscal yer 2022, the Company's investment was deemed to be other-than-temporarily impaired and the carrying value of the investment was written down to $0.
 
Available Information
 
The Company’s Internet address is www.senecafoods.com. The Company’s annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, are available on the Company’s web site, as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC. All such filings on the Company’s web site are available free of charge. Information on our website is not part of the annual report on Form 10-K.
 
In addition, the Company's website includes items related to corporate governance matters, including charters of various committees of the Board of Directors and the Company's Code of Business Conduct and Ethics. The Company intends to disclose on its website any amendment to or waiver of any provision of the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics that would otherwise be required to be disclosed under the rules of the SEC and NASDAQ.
 
 
Financial Information about Industry Segments
 
The Company has historically managed its business on the basis of three reportable food packaging segments: (1) fruits and vegetables, (2) prepared food products and (3) snack products. The other category comprises non-food packaging sales which relate to the sale of cans, ends, seed, and outside revenue from the Company's trucking and aircraft operations. During fiscal year 2021, the Company sold its prepared foods business, leaving just two reportable segments along with the other category. The Company’s food operation constituted 98% of total net sales in fiscal year 2022. Canned vegetables represented 84%, frozen vegetables represented 9%, fruit products represented 6%, and chip products represented 1% of the total food packaging net sales. Non-food packaging sales represented 2% of the Company's fiscal year 2022 net sales.
 
Principal products and markets
 
The Company’s principal products include canned vegetables, frozen vegetables, jarred fruit, and other food products. The products are sold nationwide by major grocery outlets, including supermarkets, mass merchandisers, limited assortment stores, club stores and dollar stores. Additionally, products are sold to food service distributors, restaurant chains, industrial markets, other food packagers, export customers in 90 countries, and federal, state and local governments for school and other feeding programs. Food packaging operations are primarily supported by plant locations in New York, Michigan, Oregon, Wisconsin, Washington, Idaho, Illinois, and Minnesota. Refer to the information set forth under the heading “Segment Information” in Note 14 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Part II, Item 8, “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”, for additional discussion about the Company’s segments.
 
The following table summarizes net sales by major product category for fiscal years 2022 and 2021 (in thousands):
 
    Fiscal Year  
   
2022
     
2021
 
Canned vegetables
  $ 1,135,983       $ 1,172,635  
Frozen vegetables
    123,895         102,197  
Fruit products
    84,708         88,431  
Snack products
    12,332         10,999  
Prepared foods
    -         71,866  
Other
    28,362         21,516  
    $ 1,385,280       $ 1,467,644  
 
Source and Availability of Raw Materials
 
We purchase raw materials, including raw produce, steel, ingredients and packaging materials from growers, commodity processors, steel producers and packaging suppliers. Raw materials and other input costs, such as labor, fuel, utilities and transportation, are subject to fluctuations in price attributable to a number of factors. Fluctuations in commodity prices can lead to retail price volatility and can influence consumer and trade buying patterns. The cost of raw materials, fuel, labor, distribution and other costs related to our operations can increase from time to time significantly and unexpectedly.
 
We experienced material net cost increases for raw materials and other input costs during fiscal year 2022. We attempt to manage cost inflation risks by locking in prices through short-term supply contracts, advance grower purchase agreements, and by implementing cost saving measures. We also attempt to offset rising input costs by raising sales prices to our customers. However, increases in the prices we charge our customers may lag behind rising input costs. Competitive pressures also may limit our ability to quickly raise prices in response to rising costs. To the extent we are unable to avoid or offset any present or future cost increases our operating results could be materially adversely affected.
 
Intellectual Property
 
The Company's most significant brand name, Libby's®, is held pursuant to a trademark license granted to the Company in March 1982 and renewable by the Company every 10 years for an aggregate period expiring in March 2081. The original licensor was Libby, McNeill & Libby, Inc., then an indirect subsidiary of Nestlé, S. A. ("Nestlé") and the license was granted in connection with the Company's purchase of certain of the licensor's canned vegetable operations in the United States. Corlib Brands Management, LTD acquired the license from Nestlé during 2006. The license is limited to vegetables which are shelf-stable, frozen, and thermally packaged, and includes the Company's major vegetable varieties – corn, peas and green beans – as well as certain other thermally packaged vegetable varieties and sauerkraut.
 
The Company is required to pay an annual royalty to Corlib Brands, now known as Libby's Brand Holding, Ltd., who may terminate the license for non-payment of royalty, use of the trademark in sales outside the licensed territory, failure to achieve a minimum level of sales under the licensed trademark during any calendar year or a material breach or default by the Company under the agreement (which is not cured within the specified cure period). With the purchase of Signature Fruit Company, LLC, which also uses the Libby’s® brand name, the Company re-negotiated the license agreement and created a new, combined agreement based on Libby’s® revenue dollars for fruits, vegetables, and dry beans. During fiscal year 2021, the Company and Libby’s Brand Holding, Ltd. renegotiated again to remove fruit from the license agreement. A total of $0.1 million was paid as a royalty fee for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022.
 
 
The Company also sells canned vegetables, frozen vegetables, jarred fruit, and other food products under several other brands for which the Company has obtained registered trademarks, including, Aunt Nellie’s®, CherryMan®, Green Valley®, READ®, Seneca®, and other regional brands.
 
Seasonality
 
While individual vegetables have seasonal cycles of peak production and sales, the different cycles are somewhat offsetting. Minimal food packaging occurs in the Company's last fiscal quarter ending March 31, which is the optimal time for maintenance, repairs and equipment changes in its packaging plants. The supply of commodities, current pricing, and expected new crop quantity and quality affect the timing and amount of the Company’s sales and earnings. When the seasonal harvesting periods of the Company's major vegetables are newly completed, inventories for these packaged vegetables are at their highest levels. For peas, the peak inventory time is mid-summer and for corn and green beans, the Company's highest volume vegetables, the peak inventory is in mid-autumn.
 
The Company’s revenues typically are highest in the second and third fiscal quarters. This is due, in part, because the Company’s fruit and vegetable sales exhibit seasonal increases in the third fiscal quarter due to increased retail demand during the holiday season. In addition, the Company sells canned and frozen vegetables to a co-pack customer on a bill and hold basis at the end of each pack cycle, which typically occurs during these quarters.
 
These seasonal fluctuations are illustrated in the following table, which presents certain unaudited quarterly financial information for the periods indicated (in thousands):
 
   
First
Quarter
   
Second
Quarter
   
Third
Quarter
   
Fourth
Quarter
 
Fiscal Year 2022:
                               
Net sales
  $ 235,042     $ 372,256     $ 445,593     $ 332,389  
Gross margin
    33,623       42,728       44,985       26,596  
Net earnings
    14,136       11,654       18,664       6,553  
Revolver outstanding (at quarter end)
    1,000       51,679       33,711       20,508  
                                 
Fiscal Year 2021:
                               
Net sales
  $ 288,165     $ 390,294     $ 484,392     $ 304,793  
Gross margin
    48,562       48,943       77,704       56,976  
Net earnings
    20,706       18,105       72,460       14,829  
Revolver outstanding (at quarter end)
    34,406       62,611       -       1,000  
 
Backlog
 
In the food packaging business, an end of year sales order backlog is not considered meaningful. Traditionally, larger customers provide tentative bookings for their expected purchases for the upcoming season. These bookings are further developed as data on the expected size of the related national harvests becomes available. In general, these bookings serve as a yardstick rather than as a firm commitment, since actual harvest results can vary notably from early estimates. In actual practice, the Company has substantially all of its expected seasonal production identified to potential sales outlets before the seasonal production is completed.
 
Competition
 
Competition in the packaged food industry is substantial with brand recognition and promotion, quality, service, and pricing being the major determinants in the Company’s relative market position. The Company believes that it is a major producer of canned vegetables, frozen vegetables, and jarred fruit but some producers of these products have sales which exceed the Company's sales. The Company is aware of at least 13 competitors in the U.S. packaged fruit and vegetable industry, many of which are privately held companies.
 
 
Environmental Protection
 
Environmental protection is an area that has been worked on diligently at each food packaging facility. In all locations, the Company has cooperated with federal, state, and local environmental protection authorities in developing and maintaining suitable antipollution facilities. In general, we believe our pollution control facilities are equal to or somewhat superior to those of our competitors and are within environmental protection standards. The Company does not expect any material capital expenditures to comply with environmental regulations in the near future.
 
There has been a broad range of proposed and promulgated state, national and international regulations aimed at reducing the effects of climate change. In the United States, there is a significant possibility that some form of regulation will be forthcoming at the federal level to address the effects of climate change. Such regulation could result in the creation of additional costs in the form of taxes, consultant expenses, the restriction of output, investments of capital to maintain compliance with laws and regulations, or required acquisition or trading of emission allowances.
 
Environmental Litigation and Contingencies
 
In the ordinary course of its business, the Company is made a party to certain legal proceedings seeking monetary damages, including proceedings involving product liability claims, worker’s compensation and other employee claims, tort and other general liability claims, for which it carries insurance as well as patent infringement and related litigation. The Company is in a highly regulated industry and is also periodically involved in government actions for regulatory violations and other matters surrounding the manufacturing of its products, including, but not limited to, environmental, employee, and product safety issues. While it is not feasible to predict or determine the ultimate outcome of these matters, the Company does not believe that an adverse decision in any of these legal proceedings would have a material adverse impact on its financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.
 
Employment
 
As of the end of December 2021, the Company had approximately 3,000 employees of which 2,800 are full time, 100 seasonal employees work in food packaging, and 100 full time employees work in other activities. The number of employees increases by approximately 4,000 due to an increase in seasonal employees during our peak pack season.
 
The Company has seven collective bargaining agreements with three unions covering approximately 787 of its full-time employees.  The terms of these agreements result in wages and benefits which are substantially the same for comparable positions for the Company’s non-union employees.  There is one agreement that will expire in calendar 2023, three agreements that will expire in calendar 2024, one agreement that will expire in calendar 2025, one agreement that will expire in calendar 2026, and one agreement that will expire in calendar 2027.
 
Domestic and Export Sales
 
The following table sets forth domestic and export sales (In thousands, except percentages):
 
   
Fiscal Year
 
   
2022
   
2021
 
Net sales:
               
United States
  $ 1,285,540     $ 1,372,679  
Export
    99,740       94,965  
Total net sales
  $ 1,385,280     $ 1,467,644  
                 
As a percentage of net sales:
               
United States
    92.8 %     93.5 %
Export
    7.2 %     6.5 %
Total
    100.0 %     100.0 %
 
 
Item 1A. Risk Factors
 
The following factors as well as factors described elsewhere in this Form 10-K or in other filings by the Company with the SEC, could adversely affect the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows. Other factors not presently known to us or that we presently believe are not material could also affect our business operations or financial results. The Company refers to itself as “we”, “our” or “us” in this section.
 
Fruit and Vegetable Industry Risks
 
Excess capacity in the fruit and vegetable industry has a downward impact on selling price.
 
If canned vegetable, frozen vegetable, or jarred fruit categories decline, less shelf space will be devoted to these categories in the supermarkets. Fresh and perishable businesses are improving their delivery systems around the world and the availability of fresh produce is impacting the consumers purchasing patterns relating to packaged fruit and vegetables. Our financial performance and growth are related to conditions in the United States’ fruit and vegetable packaging industry which is a mature industry with a modest growth rate during the last 10 years. Our net sales are a function of product availability and market pricing. In the fruit and vegetable packaging industry, product availability and market prices tend to have an inverse relationship: market prices tend to decrease as more product is available and to increase if less product is available. Product availability is a direct result of plantings, growing conditions, crop yields and inventory levels, all of which vary from year to year. Moreover, fruit and vegetable production outside the United States, particularly in Europe, Asia and South America, is increasing at a time when worldwide demand for certain products is being impacted by the global economic slowdown. These factors may have a significant effect on supply and competition and create downward pressure on prices. In addition, market prices can be affected by the planting and inventory levels and individual pricing decisions of our competitors. Generally, market prices in the fruit and vegetable packaging industry adjust more quickly to variations in product availability than an individual packager can adjust its cost structure; thus, in an oversupply situation, a packager’s margins likely will weaken. We typically have experienced lower margins during times of industry oversupply.
 
In the past, the fruit and vegetable packaging industry has been characterized by excess capacity, with resulting pressure on our prices and profit margins. We have closed packaging plants in past years in response to the downward pressure on prices. There can be no assurance that our margins will improve in response to favorable market conditions or that we will be able to operate profitably during depressed market conditions.
 
Growing cycles and adverse weather conditions may decrease our results from operations.
 
Our operations are affected by the growing cycles of the vegetables we package. When the vegetables are ready to be picked, we must harvest and package them quickly or forego the opportunity to package fresh picked vegetables for an entire year. Most of our vegetables are grown by farmers under contract with us. Consequently, we must pay the contract grower for the vegetables even if we cannot or do not harvest or package them. Most of our production occurs during the second quarter (July through September) of our fiscal year, which corresponds with the quarter that the growing season ends for most of the produce packaged by us. A majority of our sales occur during the second and third quarters of each fiscal year due to seasonal consumption patterns for our products. Accordingly, inventory levels are highest during the second and third quarters, and accounts receivable levels are highest during the second and third quarters. Net sales generated during our second and third fiscal quarters have a significant impact on our results of operations. Because of these seasonal fluctuations, the results of any particular quarter, particularly in the first half of our fiscal year, will not necessarily be indicative of results for the full year or for future years.
 
We set our planting schedules without knowing the effect of the weather on the crops or on the entire industry’s production. Weather conditions during the course of each vegetable crop’s growing season will affect the volume and growing time of that crop. As most of our vegetables are produced in more than one part of the U.S., this somewhat reduces the risk that our entire crop will be subject to disastrous weather. The upper Midwest is the primary growing region for the principal vegetables which we pack, namely peas, green beans and corn, and it is also a substantial source of our competitors’ vegetable production. The adverse effects of weather-related reduced production may be partially mitigated by higher selling prices for the vegetables which are produced.
 
The commodity materials that we package or otherwise require are subject to price increases that could adversely affect our profitability.
 
The materials that we use, such as raw fruit and vegetables, steel, ingredients, pouches and other packaging materials as well as the electricity, diesel fuel, and natural gas used in our business, are commodities that may experience price volatility caused by external factors, including market fluctuations, availability, currency fluctuations and changes in governmental regulations and agricultural programs. General inventory positions of major commodities, such as field corn, soybeans and wheat, all commodities with which we must compete for acreage, can have dramatic effects on prices for those commodities, which can translate into similar swings in prices needed to be paid for our contracted commodities. These programs and other events can result in reduced supplies of these commodities, higher supply costs or interruptions in our production schedules. If prices of these commodities increase beyond what we can pass along to our customers, our operating income will decrease.
 
 
Risks Associated With Our Operations
 
Pandemics or disease outbreaks, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, may disrupt our business, including among other things, our supply chain, our manufacturing operations and customer and consumer demand for our products, and could have a material adverse impact on our business.
 
The spread of pandemics or disease outbreaks, such as COVID-19, may negatively affect our operations. If a significant percentage of our workforce or the workforce of our third party business partners is unable to work, including because of illness or travel or government restrictions in connection with the COVID-19 pandemic or any future pandemic or disease outbreak, our operations may be negatively impacted. Some of our workforce dwell in company provided housing and therefore outbreaks such as COVID-19 would need to be managed, to the extent possible, to meet health care protocols. Pandemics or disease outbreaks could result in a widespread health crisis that could adversely affect economies and financial markets, consumer spending and confidence levels resulting in an economic downturn that could affect customer and consumer demand for our products.
 
Our efforts to manage and mitigate these factors may be unsuccessful, and the effectiveness of these efforts depends on factors beyond our control, including the duration and severity of any pandemic or disease outbreak, as well as third party actions taken to contain its spread and mitigate public health effects.
 
The ultimate impact of a pandemic on our business will depend on many factors, including, among others, the duration of social distancing and stay-at-home mandates, our ability to continue to operate our manufacturing facilities and maintain the supply chain without material disruption, and the extent to which macroeconomic conditions resulting from the pandemic and the pace of the subsequent recovery may impact consumer eating habits.
 
We depend upon key customers.
 
Our products are sold in a highly competitive marketplace, which includes increased concentration and a growing presence of large-format retailers and discounters. Dependence upon key customers could lead to increased pricing pressure by these customers. A relatively limited number of customers account for a large percentage of the Company’s total net sales. The top ten customers represented approximately 53%, and 50% of net sales for fiscal years 2022 and 2021, respectively. If we lose a significant customer or if sales to a significant customer materially decrease, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.
 
If we do not maintain the market shares of our products, our business and revenues may be adversely affected.
 
All of our products compete with those of other national and regional food packaging companies under highly competitive conditions. The fruit and vegetable products which we sell under our own brand names not only compete with fruit and vegetable products produced by food packaging competitors, but also compete with products we produce and sell under contract packing agreements with other companies who market those products under their own brand names and the vegetables we sell to various retail grocery chains which carry our customer’s own brand names.
 
The customers who buy our products to sell under their own brand names control the marketing programs for those products. In recent years, many major retail food chains have been increasing their promotions, offerings and shelf space allocations for their own fruit and vegetable brands, to the detriment of fruit and vegetable brands owned by the packagers, including our own brands. We cannot predict the pricing or promotional activities of our customers/competitors or whether they will have a negative effect on us. There are competitive pressures and other factors, which could cause our products to lose market share or result in significant price erosion that could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Increases in logistics and other transportation-related costs could materially adversely impact our results of operations.
 
Our ability to competitively serve our customers depends on the availability of reliable and low-cost transportation. We use multiple forms of transportation to bring our products to market. They include trucks, intermodal, rail cars, and ships. Disruption to the timely supply of these services or increases in the cost of these services for any reason, including availability or cost of fuel, regulations affecting the industry, or labor shortages in the transportation industry, could have an adverse effect on our ability to serve our customers, and could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
A recall of our products could have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, we may be subject to significant liability should the consumption of any of our products cause injury, illness or death.
 
The sale of food products for human consumption involves the risk of injury to consumers. Such injuries may result from mislabeling, tampering by unauthorized third parties or product contamination or spoilage, including the presence of foreign objects, undeclared allergens, substances, chemicals, other agents or residues introduced during the growing, manufacturing, storage, handling or transportation phases of production. Under certain circumstances, we may be required to recall products, leading to a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated financial condition, results of operations or liquidity. Even if a situation does not necessitate a recall, product liability claims might be asserted against us. We have from time to time been involved in product liability lawsuits, none of which have been material to our business. While we are subject to governmental inspection and regulations and believe our facilities comply in all material respects with all applicable laws and regulations, if the consumption of any of our products causes, or is alleged to have caused, a health-related illness in the future we may become subject to claims or lawsuits relating to such matters. Even if a product liability claim is unsuccessful or is not fully pursued, the negative publicity surrounding any assertion that our products caused injury, illness or death could adversely affect our reputation with existing and potential customers and our corporate and brand image. Moreover, claims or liabilities of this sort might not be covered by our insurance or by any rights of indemnity or contribution that we may have against others. We maintain product liability insurance in an amount we believe to be adequate. However, we cannot assure you that we will not incur claims or liabilities for which we are not insured or that exceed the amount of our insurance coverage. A product liability judgment against us or a product recall or the damage to our reputation resulting therefrom could have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated financial condition, results of operations or liquidity.
 
Pending and future litigation may lead us to incur significant costs.
 
We are, or may become, party to various lawsuits and claims arising in the normal course of business, which may include lawsuits or claims relating to contracts, intellectual property, product recalls, product liability, the marketing and labeling of products, employment matters, environmental matters or other aspects of our business. Even when not merited, the defense of these lawsuits may divert our management’s attention, and we may incur significant expenses in defending these lawsuits. In addition, we may be required to pay damage awards or settlements or become subject to injunctions or other equitable remedies, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated financial condition, results of operations or liquidity. The outcome of litigation is often difficult to predict, and the outcome of pending or future litigation may have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated financial condition, results of operations or liquidity.
 
We face risks associated with our defined benefit pension plan.
 
We maintain a company-sponsored defined benefit pension plan. A deterioration in the value of plan assets resulting from poor market performance, a general financial downturn or otherwise could cause an increase in the amount of contributions we are required to make to these plans. For example, our defined benefit pension plan may from time to time move from an overfunded to underfunded status driven by decreases in plan asset values that may result from changes in long-term interest rates and disruptions in U.S. or global financial markets. Additionally, historically low interest rates coupled with poor market performance would have the effect of decreasing the funded status of these plans which would result in greater required contributions. For a more detailed description of the pension plan, refer to the information set forth under the heading “Retirement Plans in Note 10 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Part II, Item 8, “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” An obligation to make additional, unanticipated contributions to our defined benefit plans could reduce the cash available for working capital and other corporate uses, and may have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated financial position, results of operations and liquidity.
 
Our business is dependent on our information technology systems and software, and failure to protect against or effectively respond to cyber-attacks, security breaches, or other incidents involving those systems, could adversely affect day-to-day operations and decision making processes and have an adverse effect on our performance and reputation.
 
The efficient operation of our business depends on our information technology systems, which we rely on to effectively manage our business data, communications, logistics, accounting, regulatory and other business processes. If we do not allocate and effectively manage the resources necessary to build and sustain an appropriate technology environment, our business, reputation, or financial results could be negatively impacted. In addition, our information technology systems may be vulnerable to damage or interruption from circumstances beyond our control, including systems failures, natural disasters, terrorist attacks, viruses, ransomware, security breaches or cyber incidents. Cyber-attacks are becoming more sophisticated and are increasing in the number of attempts and frequency by groups and individuals with a wide range of motives. A security breach of sensitive information could result in damage to our reputation and our relations with our customers or employees. Any such damage or interruption could have a material adverse effect on our business.
 
 
We generate agricultural food packaging wastes and are subject to substantial environmental regulation.
 
As a food packager, we regularly dispose of produce wastes (silage) and processing water as well as materials used in plant operation and maintenance and our plant boilers, which generate heat used in packaging and can manufacturing operations, producing generally small emissions into the air. These activities and operations are regulated by federal and state laws and the respective federal and state environmental agencies. Occasionally, we may be required to remediate conditions found by the regulators to be in violation of environmental law or to contribute to the cost of remediating waste disposal sites, which we neither owned nor operated, but in which, we and other companies deposited waste materials, usually through independent waste disposal companies. Future possible costs of environmental remediation, contributions and penalties could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Our production capacity for certain products and commodities is concentrated in a limited number of facilities, exposing us to a material disruption in production in the event that a disaster strikes.
 
We only have one plant that produces fruit products and one plant that produces pumpkin products. We have two plants that manufacture empty cans, one with substantially more capacity than the other, which are not interchangeable since each plant cannot necessarily produce all the can sizes needed. Although we maintain property and business interruption insurance coverage, there can be no assurance that this level of coverage is adequate in the event of a catastrophe or significant disruption at these or other Company facilities. If such an event occurs, it could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
We may undertake acquisitions or product innovations and may have difficulties integrating them or may not realize the anticipated benefits.
 
In the future, we may undertake acquisitions of other businesses or introduce new products, although there can be no assurances that these will occur. Such undertakings involve numerous risks and significant investments. There can be no assurance that we will be able to identify and acquire acquisition candidates on favorable terms, to profitably manage or to successfully integrate future businesses that we may acquire or new products we may introduce without substantial costs, delays or problems. Any of these outcomes could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
We are dependent upon a seasonal workforce and our inability to hire sufficient employees may adversely affect our business.
 
At the end of December 2021, we had approximately 3,000 employees of which 2,800 full time, 100 seasonal employees worked in food packaging, and 100 employees worked in other activities. During the peak summer harvest period, we hire up to approximately 4,000 seasonal employees to help package fruit and vegetables. If there is a shortage of seasonal labor, or if there is an increase to minimum wage rates, this could have a negative impact on our cost of operations. Many of our packaging operations are located in rural communities that may not have sufficient labor pools, requiring us to hire employees from other regions. An inability to hire and train sufficient employees during the critical harvest period could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Increases in Labor Costs or Work Stoppages or Strikes Could Materially and Adversely Affect Our Financial Condition and Results of Operations
 
Personnel costs, including the costs of medical and other employee health and welfare benefits, have increased. These costs can vary substantially as a result of an increase in the number, mix and experience of our employees and changes in health care and other employment-related laws. There are no assurances that we will succeed in reducing future increases in such costs. Increases in personnel costs can also be amplified by low unemployment rates, preferences among workers in the labor market and general tight labor market conditions in any of the areas where we operate. Our inability to control such costs could materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. Although we consider our labor relations to be good, if a significant number of our employees engaged in a work slowdown, or other type of labor unrest, it could in some cases impair our ability to supply our products to customers, which could result in reduced sales, and may distract our management from focusing on our business and strategic priorities. Any of these activities could materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
 
Environmental and other regulation of our business, including potential climate change regulation, could adversely impact us by increasing our production cost or restricting our ability to import certain products into the United States.
 
Climate change serves as a risk multiplier increasing both the frequency and severity of natural disasters that may affect our business operations. Moreover, there has been a broad range of proposed and promulgated state, national and international regulation aimed at reducing the effects of climate change. In the United States, there is a significant possibility that some form of regulation will be enacted at the federal level to address the effects of climate change. Such regulation could take several forms that could result in additional costs in the form of taxes, consultant costs, the restriction of output, investments of capital to maintain compliance with laws and regulations, or required acquisition or trading of emission allowances. Climate change regulation continues to evolve, and it is not possible to accurately estimate either a timetable for implementation or our future compliance costs relating to implementation.
 
 
There may be increased governmental legislative and regulatory activity in reaction to consumer perception related to enamels.
 
There has been continued state legislative activity to ban certain enamals used to line cans; such as Bisphenol-A ("BPA"). These legislative decisions are predominantly driven by consumer perception that BPA may be harmful. These actions have been taken despite the scientific evidence and general consensus of United States and international government agencies that BPA is safe and does not pose a risk to human health. The legislative actions combined with growing public perception about food safety may require us to change some of the materials used as linings in our packaging materials. Failure to do so could result in a loss of sales as well as loss in value of the inventory utilizing certain materials. In collaboration with other can makers as well as enamel suppliers, we have aggressively worked to find alternative materials for can linings not manufactured using BPA. We have transitioned to BPANI (BPA Non-intent) and less than 1% of our canned product volume still includes BPA. Even though BPANI has been fully approved by the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”), there could be future legislative or regulatory actions that claim BPANI also poses a risk to human health.
 
The implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2011 may affect operations
 
The Food Safety Modernization Act ("FSMA") was enacted with the goal of enabling the FDA to better protect public health by strengthening the food safety system. FSMA was designed to focus the efforts of FDA on preventing food safety problems rather than relying primarily on reacting to problems after they occur. The law also provides the FDA with new enforcement authorities designed to achieve higher rates of compliance with prevention and risk-based food safety standards and to better respond to and contain problems when they do occur.  The increased inspections, mandatory recall authority of the FDA, increased scrutiny of foreign sourced or supplied food products, and increased records access may have an impact on our business. As we are already in a highly regulated business, operating under the increased scrutiny of more FDA authority does not appear likely to negatively impact our business.  The law also gives FDA important new tools to hold imported foods to the same standards as domestic foods.
 
Our results are dependent on successful marketplace initiatives and acceptance by consumers of our products.
 
Our product introductions and product improvements, along with other marketplace initiatives, are designed to capitalize on new customer or consumer trends. The FDA has issued a statement on sodium which referred to an Institute of Medicine statement that too much sodium is a major contributor to high blood pressure. Some of our products contain a moderate amount of sodium per recommended serving, which is based on consumer’s preferences for taste.  In order to remain successful, we must anticipate and react to these new trends and develop new products or packages to address them. While we devote significant resources to meeting this goal, we may not be successful in developing new products or packages, or our new products or packages may not be accepted by customers or consumers.
 
Financing Risks
 
Global economic conditions may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Unfavorable economic conditions, including the impact of recessions in the United States and throughout the world, may negatively affect our business and financial results. These economic conditions could negatively impact (i) consumer demand for our products, (ii) the mix of our products’ sales, (iii) our ability to collect accounts receivable on a timely basis, (iv) the ability of suppliers to provide the materials required in our operations and (v) our ability to obtain financing or to otherwise access the capital markets. The strength of the U.S. dollar versus other world currencies could result in increased competition from imported products and decreased sales to our international customers. A prolonged recession could result in decreased revenue, margins and earnings. Additionally, the economic situation could have an impact on our lenders or customers, causing them to fail to meet their obligations to us. The occurrence of any of these risks could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Our ability to manage our working capital and our Revolver is critical to our success.
 
As of March 31, 2022, we had a $20.5 million outstanding balance on our revolving credit facility (“Revolver”).  During our second and third fiscal quarters, our operations generally require more cash than is available from operations. In these circumstances, it is necessary to borrow under our Revolver. Our ability to obtain financing in the future through credit facilities will be affected by several factors, including our creditworthiness, our ability to operate in a profitable manner and general market and credit conditions. Significant changes in our business or cash outflows from operations could create a need for additional working capital. An inability to obtain additional working capital on terms reasonably acceptable to us or access the Revolver would materially and adversely affect our operations. Additionally, if we need to use a portion of our cash flows to pay principal and interest on our debt, it will reduce the amount of money we have for operations, working capital, capital expenditures, expansions, acquisitions or general corporate or other business activities. 
 
 
Failure to comply with the requirements of our debt agreements could have a material adverse effect on our business.
 
Our debt agreements contain financial and other restrictive covenants which, among other things, limit our ability to borrow money, including with respect to the refinancing of existing indebtedness. These provisions may limit our ability to conduct our business, take advantage of business opportunities and respond to changing business, market and economic conditions. In addition, they may place us at a competitive disadvantage relative to other companies that may be subject to fewer, if any, restrictions. Failure to comply with the requirements of our debt agreements could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. We have pledged our accounts receivable, inventory, equipment, capital stock, or other ownership interests that we own in our subsidiaries to secure certain debt. If a default occurred and was not cured, secured lenders could foreclose on this collateral.
 
Risks Relating to Our Stock
 
Our existing shareholders, if acting together, may be able to exert control over matters requiring shareholder approval.
 
Holders of our Class B common stock are entitled to one vote per share, while holders of our Class A common stock are entitled to one-twentieth of a vote per share. In addition, holders of our 10% Cumulative Convertible Voting Preferred Stock, Series A, our 10% Cumulative Convertible Voting Preferred Stock, Series B and, solely with respect to the election of directors, our 6% Cumulative Voting Preferred Stock, which we refer to as our voting preferred stock, are entitled to one vote per share. As of March 31, 2022, holders of Class B common stock and voting preferred stock held 89.1% of the combined voting power of all shares of capital stock then outstanding and entitled to vote. These shareholders, if acting together, would be in a position to control the election of our directors and to effect or prevent certain corporate transactions that require majority or supermajority approval of the combined classes, including mergers and other business combinations. This may result in us taking corporate actions that you may not consider to be in your best interest and may affect the price of our common stock.
 
As of March 31, 2022, our current executive officers and directors beneficially owned 10.4% of our outstanding shares of Class A common stock, 49.7% of our outstanding shares of Class B common stock and 14.0% of our voting preferred stock, or 31.8% of the combined voting power of our outstanding shares of capital stock. This concentration of voting power may inhibit changes in control of the Company and may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.
 
Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws contain provisions that discourage corporate takeovers.
 
Certain provisions of our certificate of incorporation and bylaws and provisions of the New York Business Corporation Law may have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control. Various provisions of our certificate of incorporation and bylaws may inhibit changes in control not approved by our directors and may have the effect of depriving shareholders of any opportunity to receive a premium over the prevailing market price of our common stock in the event of an attempted unsolicited takeover. In addition, the existence of these provisions may adversely affect the market price of our common stock. These provisions include:
 
 
a classified board of directors;
   
 
 
a requirement that special meetings of shareholders be called only by our directors or holders of 25% of the voting power of all shares outstanding and entitled to vote at the meeting;
   
 
 
our board of directors has the power to classify and reclassify any of our unissued shares of capital stock into shares of capital stock with such preferences, rights, powers and restrictions as the board of directors may determine;
   
 
 
the affirmative vote of two thirds of the shares present and entitled to vote is required to amend our bylaws or remove a director; and
   
 
 
under the New York Business Corporation Law, in addition to certain restrictions which may apply to “business combinations” involving us and an “interested shareholder”, a plan for our merger or consolidation must be approved by two-thirds of the votes of all outstanding shares entitled to vote thereon. See “Our existing shareholders, if acting together, may be able to exert control over matters requiring shareholder approval.” 
 
We have not paid dividends on our common stock in the past.
 
We have not declared or paid any cash dividends on our common stock in the past. In addition, payment of cash dividends on our common stock is not permitted by the terms of our revolving credit facility. This policy may be revisited under the correct circumstances in the future.
 
 
Other Risks
 
Tax legislation could impact future cash flows.
 
We use the Last-In, First-Out (LIFO) method of inventory accounting. As of March 31, 2022, we had a LIFO reserve of $164.5 million which, at the U.S. corporate tax rate, represents approximately $41.4 million of income taxes, payment of which is delayed to future dates based upon changes in inventory costs. From time-to-time, discussions regarding changes in U.S. tax laws have included the potential of LIFO being repealed. Should LIFO be repealed, the $41.4 million of postponed taxes, plus any future benefit realized prior to the date of repeal, would likely have to be repaid over some period of time. Repayment of these postponed taxes will reduce the amount of cash that we would have available to fund our operations, working capital, capital expenditures, expansions, acquisitions or general corporate or other business activities. This could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
The tax status of our insurance subsidiary could be challenged resulting in an acceleration of income tax payments.
In conjunction with our workers’ compensation program, we operate a wholly owned insurance subsidiary, Dundee Insurance Company, Inc. We recognize this subsidiary as an insurance company for federal income tax purposes with respect to our consolidated federal income tax return. In the event the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) were to determine that this subsidiary does not qualify as an insurance company, we could be required to make accelerated income tax payments to the IRS that we otherwise would have deferred until future periods.
 
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
 
None
 
 
Item 2. Properties
 
The following table details the Company’s manufacturing plants and warehouses:
 
   
Square
         
   
Footage
   
Acres
 
    (000)          
Food Group
               
Nampa, Idaho
    243       16  
Payette, Idaho
    392       43  
Princeville, Illinois
    288       518  
Hart, Michigan
    351       78  
Traverse City, Michigan
    58       43  
Blue Earth, Minnesota
    286       429  
Glencoe, Minnesota
    674       798  
LeSueur, Minnesota
    82       7  
Montgomery, Minnesota
    561       1,652  
Rochester, Minnesota
    835       620  
Geneva, New York
    769       594  
Leicester, New York
    200       91  
Dayton, Oregon
    82       19  
Dayton, Washington
    250       28  
Yakima, Washington
    122       8  
Baraboo, Wisconsin
    625       13  
Berlin, Wisconsin
    89       125  
Cambria East, Wisconsin
    399       401  
Cambria West, Wisconsin
    212       321  
Clyman, Wisconsin
    438       724  
Cumberland, Wisconsin
    400       307  
Gillett, Wisconsin
    324       105  
Janesville, Wisconsin
    1,234       341  
Mayville, Wisconsin
    239       353  
Oakfield, Wisconsin
    229       2,135  
Ripon, Wisconsin
    634       87  
                 
Non-Food Group (1)
               
Marion, New York
    6       -  
Penn Yan, New York
    27       4  
Total
    10,049       9,860  
 
 
(1)
The table does not include facilities in Albany, Oregon and Beverly, Washington that were idle and classified as an asset held for sale on our consolidated balance sheet as of March 31, 2022. The table also does not include a non-operational facilty in Mendota, Illinois.
 
The Company believes that these facilities are suitable and adequate for the purposes for which they are currently intended. All locations, although highly utilized, have the ability to expand as sales requirements justify. Because of the seasonal production cycles, the exact extent of utilization is difficult to measure.
 
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
 
The information set forth under the heading “Legal Proceedings and Other Contingencies” in Note 15 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Part II, Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K is incorporated herein by reference.
 
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
 
Not Applicable.
 
 
PART II
 
Item 5. Market for Registrants Common Stock, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
 
The information set forth under the heading “Stockholders Equity in Note 11 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Part II, Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K is incorporated herein by reference.
 
Common Stock Performance Graph
 
As a smaller reporting company, we are not required to provide disclosure pursuant to this Item.
 
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
 
On June 11, 2021, the Board authorized a stock repurchase program for the repurchase of up to 1,500,000 shares of the Company's Class A and/or Class B Common Stock, including the shares of convertible participating preferred stock of the Company, (collectively, the “Common Stock”). Under the authorization, the Company may purchase shares of Common Stock from time to time in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions in compliance with the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Board also authorized the establishment of a stock trading plan pursuant to Rule 10b5-1 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, to make purchases of Common Stock pursuant to the stock repurchase program. The timing and amount of stock repurchases under the program, if any, will be at the discretion of management, and will depend on available cash, market conditions and other considerations. Therefore, we cannot assure you as to the number or aggregate dollar amount of shares, if any, that will be repurchased under the repurchase program. We may discontinue the program at any time.
 
     
 Total Number of
 
 Average Price 
   
     
 Shares Purchased
 
 Paid per Share
 
Maximum Number
               
Total Number of Shares
(or Approximate Dollar Value) of 
     
Class A 
Class B 
 
Class A 
Class B 
Purchased as Part of Publicly 
Shares that May Yet Be Purchased 
Period
Common
Common
 
Common
Common
Announced Plans or Programs
Under the Plans or Programs
 01/01/2022
–  01/31/2022
66,688
-
$
47.22
-
66,688
 
02/01/2022
02/28/2022
52,071
-
$
48.10
-
52,071
 
03/01/2022
03/31/2022 (1)
91,948
-
$
51.21
-
80,070
 
 
Total  
210,707
$
49.18
198,829
782,281
 
 
(1)
Includes 11,878 shares that were purchased in open market transactions by the trustees under the Seneca Foods Corporation Employees' Savings Plan to provide employee matching contributions under the plan.
 
Item 6. Reserved
 
Item 7. Managements Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
 
Refer to the information in the 2022 Annual Report, attached as Exhibit 13 to this Annual Report on Form 10-K, under the section “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”, which is incorporated by reference.
 
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
 
As a smaller reporting company, we are not required to provide disclosure pursuant to this Item.
 
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
 
Refer to the information in the 2022 Annual Report, attached as Exhibit 13 to this Annual Report on Form 10-K, which is incorporated herein by reference.
 
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
 
None.
 
 
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures
 
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
 
Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act), as of March 31, 2022. Based upon this evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of March 31, 2022, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures: (1) were designed to ensure that material information relating to the Company is made known to our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report was being prepared, so as to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure and (2) were effective, in that they provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms.
 
Managements Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
 
Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over the Company’s financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act). Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect all misstatements. Projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
 
Our management assessed the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of March 31, 2022. In making this assessment, our management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013). Based on our assessment, management believes that, as of March 31, 2022, our internal control over financial reporting is effective based on those criteria.
 
Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting
 
There was no change in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act) during the quarter ended March 31, 2022 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
 
Item 9B. Other Information
 
None.
 
 
PART III
 
Certain information required by Part III is incorporated by reference from the Company’s Definitive Proxy Statement for its 2022 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on August 10, 2022 (“Proxy Statement”). The Proxy Statement will be filed within 120 days after the end of the Company’s fiscal year ended March 31, 2022.
 
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
 
The following sections of the Proxy Statement are incorporated herein by reference:
 
 
Information Concerning Directors
 
Executive Officers
 
Delinquent Section 16(a) Reports
 
Available Information
 
Board Governance
 
Audit Committee
 
Item 11. Executive Compensation
 
The following sections of the Proxy Statement are incorporated herein by reference:
 
 
Compensation Discussion and Analysis
 
Summary Compensation Table
 
Outstanding Equity Awards at 2022 Fiscal Year-End
 
Pension Benefits
 
Compensation of Directors
 
Compensation Committee Interlocks
 
The information included under the heading “Compensation Committee Report” in the Proxy Statement is also incorporated herein by reference; however, this information shall not be deemed to be “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the SEC or subject to Regulation 14A or 14C, or to the liabilities of Section 18 of the Exchange Act.
 
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
 
Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans
 
The 2007 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2007 Equity Plan”) was approved by shareholders at the Company’s annual meeting on August 10, 2007 and extended on July 28, 2017. The 2007 Equity Plan expires in August 2027 and originally authorized the issuance of up to 100,000 shares of either Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock or a combination of the two classes of stock. 4,266 shares were awarded in fiscal year 2022 under the terms of the 2007 Equity Plan. As of March 31, 2022, there were 48,486 shares available for distribution as part of future awards under the 2007 Equity Plan. No additional shares have been awarded under the 2007 Equity Plan through the date of this Form 10-K. 
 
There are no equity compensation plans not approved by the Company’s shareholders.
 
The following sections of the Proxy Statement are incorporated herein by reference:
 
 
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners
 
Security Ownership of Management and Directors.
 
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
 
The following sections of the Proxy Statement are incorporated herein by reference:
 
 
Independent Directors
 
Certain Transactions and Relationships Security Ownership of Management and Directors
 
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services
 
The following sections of the Proxy Statement are incorporated herein by reference:
 
 
Principal Accountant Fees and Services
 
 
PART IV
 
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedule
 
 
A.
Exhibits, Financial Statements, and Supplemental Schedule
 
 
1.
Financial Statements ‑ the following consolidated financial statements of the Registrant, included in the 2022 Annual Report to Shareholders, are incorporated by reference in Part II, Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”:
 
Consolidated Statements of Net Earnings – Years ended March 31, 2022 and 2021
 
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss) – Years ended March 31, 2022 and 2021
 
Consolidated Balance Sheets ‑ March 31, 2022 and 2021
 
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows – Years ended March 31, 2022 and 2021
 
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity – Years ended March 31, 2022 and 2021
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – Years ended March 31, 2022 and 2021
 
Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm (PCAOB ID 6581)
 
  Pages
 
 
2.
Supplemental Schedule:
 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm on Schedule Ex. 13
Schedule II—Valuation and Qualifying Accounts Ex. 13
 
Other schedules have not been filed because the conditions requiring the filing do not exist or the required information is included in the consolidated financial statements, including the notes thereto.
 
 
3.
Exhibits:
 
Exhibit Number          Description
 
 
3.1
 
 
3.2
 
 
3.3
 
 
4.1
 
 
10.1
 
 
10.2
 
 
10.3
 
 
10.4*
 
17

 
 
10.5*
 
 
10.6*
 
 
10.7*
 
 
10.8* 
 
 
10.9*
 
 
10.10*
 
 
13
 
 
21
 
 
23.1
 
 
31.1
 
 
31.2
 
 
32
 
 
101
The following materials from Seneca Foods Corporation’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022, formatted in Inline XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language): (i) consolidated balance sheets, (ii) consolidated statements of net earnings, (iii) consolidated statements of comprehensive income (loss), (iv) consolidated statements of cash flows, (v) consolidated statement of stockholders’ equity and (vi) the notes to the consolidated financial statements
 
 
104
Cover page Interactive Data File (formatted as inline XBRL with applicable taxonomy extension information contained in Exhibits 101.*)
 
* Indicates management or compensatory agreement
 
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary
 
None
 
 
 
 
SIGNATURES
 
Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Exchange Act, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
 
SENECA FOODS CORPORATION
 
 
By: /s/ Timothy J. Benjamin                  
Timothy J. Benjamin
Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer
 
June 10, 2022
 
 
Pursuant to the requirements of the Exchange Act, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated:
 
Signature
 
Title
 
Date
         
/s/Paul L. Palmby
 
President and Chief Executive Officer
 
June 10, 2022
Paul L. Palmby
 
Director
   
   
(Principal Executive Officer)
   
         
/s/Timothy J. Benjamin 
 
Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer,
 
June 10, 2022
Timothy J. Benjamin
 
and Treasurer  
   
   
(Principal Financial Officer)
   
         
/s/Gregory R. Ide
 
Vice President, Controller, 
 
June 10, 2022
Gregory R. Ide
 
and Assistant Secretary  
   
   
(Principal Accounting Officer)
   
         
/s/Kraig H. Kayser
 
Director (Chairman)
 
June 10, 2022
Kraig H. Kayser
       
         
/s/Kathryn J. Boor
 
Director
 
June 10, 2022
Kathryn J. Boor
       
         
/s/Peter R. Call
 
Director
 
June 10, 2022
Peter R. Call
       
         
/s/John P. Gaylord                
 
Director
 
June 10, 2022
John P. Gaylord
       
         
/s/Linda K. Nelson  
 
Director
 
June 10, 2022
Linda K. Nelson 
       
         
/s/Michael R. Nozzolio 
 
Director
 
June 10, 2022
Michael R. Nozzolio 
       
         
/s/Donald J. Stuart
 
Director
 
June 10, 2022
Donald J. Stuart
       
         
/s/Keith A. Woodward
 
Director
 
June 10, 2022
Keith A. Woodward
 
19

View differences made from one year to another to evaluate Seneca Foods Corp's financial trajectory

Compare SEC Filings Year-over-Year (YoY) and Quarter-over-Quarter (QoQ)
Sample 10-K Year-over-Year (YoY) Comparison

Compare this 10-K Annual Report to its predecessor by reading our highlights to see what text and tables were  removed  ,   added    and   changed   by Seneca Foods Corp.

Continue

Assess how Seneca Foods Corp's management team is paid from their Annual Proxy

Definitive Proxy Statement (Form DEF 14A)
Screenshot example of actual Proxy Statement

Seneca Foods Corp's Definitive Proxy Statement (Form DEF 14A) filed after their 2022 10-K Annual Report includes:

  • Voting Procedures
  • Board Members
  • Executive Team
  • Salaries, Bonuses, Perks
  • Peers / Competitors

Continue

Tools

Financial Statements, Disclosures and Schedules

Inside this 10-K Annual Report

Document And Entity Information
Consolidated Balance Sheets
Consolidated Balance Sheets (Parentheticals)
Consolidated Statements Of Cash Flows
Consolidated Statements Of Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Consolidated Statements Of Comprehensive Income (Loss) (Parentheticals)
Consolidated Statements Of Net Earnings
Consolidated Statements Of Net Earnings (Parentheticals)
Consolidated Statements Of Stockholders' Equity
Consolidated Statements Of Stockholders' Equity (Parentheticals)
Note 1 - Summary Of Significant Accounting Policies
Note 1 - Summary Of Significant Accounting Policies (Details Textual)
Note 1 - Summary Of Significant Accounting Policies (Tables)
Note 1 - Summary Of Significant Accounting Policies - Estimated Useful Lives (Details)
Note 10 - Retirement Plans
Note 10 - Retirement Plans (Details Textual)
Note 10 - Retirement Plans (Tables)
Note 10 - Retirement Plans - Amounts Recognized In Accumulated Other Comprehensive (Details)
Note 10 - Retirement Plans - Assumptions Used To Measure (Details)
Note 10 - Retirement Plans - Expected Contributions (Details)
Note 10 - Retirement Plans - Fair Value Of Plan Assets (Details)
Note 10 - Retirement Plans - Net Periodic Benefit Cost (Details)
Note 10 - Retirement Plans - Plan Assets (Details)
Note 10 - Retirement Plans - Statement Of Unfunded Status (Details)
Note 11 - Stockholders' Equity
Note 11 - Stockholders' Equity (Details Textual)
Note 12 - Fair Value Of Financial Instrument - Fair Value And Carrying Value Of Long-Term Debt (Details)
Note 12 - Fair Value Of Financial Instruments
Note 12 - Fair Value Of Financial Instruments (Tables)
Note 13 - Other Operating Income And Expense
Note 13 - Other Operating Income And Expense (Details Textual)
Note 14 - Segment Information
Note 14 - Segment Information (Details Textual)
Note 14 - Segment Information (Tables)
Note 14 - Segment Information - Segment Information (Details)
Note 15 - Legal Proceedings And Other Contingencies
Note 16 - Plant Restructuring
Note 16 - Plant Restructuring (Tables)
Note 16 - Plant Restructuring - Restructuring Reserve (Details)
Note 17 - Related Party Transactions
Note 17 - Related Party Transactions (Details Textual)
Note 2 - Revenue Recognition
Note 2 - Revenue Recognition (Details Textual)
Note 2 - Revenue Recognition (Tables)
Note 2 - Revenue Recognition - Segment Revenue Disaggregated By Product Category Groups (Details)
Note 3 - Earnings Per Share
Note 3 - Earnings Per Share (Tables)
Note 3 - Earnings Per Share - Earnings Per Share (Details)
Note 4 - Inventories
Note 4 - Inventories (Details Textual)
Note 4 - Inventories (Tables)
Note 4 - Inventories - Inventories By Category And Impact Of Using Lifo Method (Details)
Note 5 - Property, Plant And Equipment
Note 5 - Property, Plant And Equipment (Details Textual)
Note 5 - Property, Plant And Equipment (Tables)
Note 5 - Property, Plant And Equipment - Property, Plant And Equipment (Details)
Note 6 - Assets Held For Sale
Note 6 - Assets Held For Sale (Details Textual)
Note 6 - Assets Held For Sale (Tables)
Note 6 - Assets Held For Sale - Assets And Liabilities Held For Sale (Details)
Note 7 - Long-Term Debt
Note 7 - Long-Term Debt (Details Textual)
Note 7 - Long-Term Debt (Tables)
Note 7 - Long-Term Debt - Debt Repayment Requirements (Details)
Note 7 - Long-Term Debt - Revolving Line Of Credit Summary (Details)
Note 7 - Long-Term Debt - Summary Of Long-Term Debt (Details)
Note 8 - Leases
Note 8 - Leases (Tables)
Note 8 - Leases - Lease Expense (Details)
Note 8 - Leases - Undiscounted Future Lease Payments Under Operating Leases And Financial Leases (Details)
Note 9 - Income Taxes
Note 9 - Income Taxes (Details Textual)
Note 9 - Income Taxes (Tables)
Note 9 - Income Taxes - Deferred Income Tax Assets And Liabilities (Details)
Note 9 - Income Taxes - Provision Of Income Taxes (Details)
Note 9 - Income Taxes - Reconciliation Of Income Tax Rate (Details)
Note 9 - Income Taxes - Uncertain Tax Positions (Details)
Schedule Ii - Valuation And Qualifying Accounts
Schedule Ii - Valuation And Qualifying Accounts (Tables)
Schedule Ii - Valuation And Qualifying Accounts - Valuation And Qualifying Accounts (Details)
Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
Ticker: SENEA
CIK: 88948
Form Type: 10-K Annual Report
Accession Number: 0001437749-22-014782
Submitted to the SEC: Fri Jun 10 2022 4:14:54 PM EST
Accepted by the SEC: Fri Jun 10 2022
Period: Thursday, March 31, 2022
Industry: Canned Fruits Veg Preserves Jams And Jellies

External Resources:
Stock Quote
Social Media

Bookmark the Permalink:
https://last10k.com/sec-filings/senea/0001437749-22-014782.htm