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Rpc Inc (RES) SEC Filing 10-K Annual Report for the fiscal year ending Friday, December 31, 2021

Rpc Inc

CIK: 742278 Ticker: RES

 

Exhibit 99

 

 

RPC, Inc. Reports Fourth Quarter 2021 Financial Results

 

ATLANTA, January 26, 2022 - RPC, Inc. (NYSE: RES) today announced its unaudited results for the fourth quarter and year ended December 31, 2021. RPC provides a broad range of specialized oilfield services and equipment primarily to independent and major oilfield companies engaged in the exploration, production and development of oil and gas properties throughout the United States and in selected international markets.

 

For the quarter ended December 31, 2021, RPC generated revenues of $268.3 million, an increase of 80.5 percent compared to $148.6 million in the fourth quarter of 2020 due to higher customer activity levels resulting in higher utilization of our existing equipment and pricing improvements. Operating profit for the fourth quarter of 2021 was $20.1 million compared to an operating loss of $21.6 million in the fourth quarter of the prior year. Adjusted operating loss for the fourth quarter of 2020 was $11.3 million.1 Net income for the fourth quarter of 2021 was $12.3 million, or $0.06 diluted earnings per share, compared to a net loss of $10.2 million, or $0.05 loss per share in the fourth quarter of the prior year. The adjusted net loss in the fourth quarter of 2020 was $6.8 million, or $0.03 adjusted loss per share.2 Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) for the fourth quarter of 2021 was $39.4 million, compared to negative $2.5 million in the same period of the prior year.3 Adjusted EBITDA for the fourth quarter of 2020 was $7.8 million.3

 

Cost of revenues during the fourth quarter of 2021 was $200.6 million, or 74.8 percent of revenues, compared to $117.9 million, or 79.3 percent of revenues during the fourth quarter of 2020. Cost of revenues increased primarily due to increases in expenses consistent with higher activity levels, such as materials and supplies expenses, maintenance and repairs expenses, employment costs and fuel costs. In addition, these costs increased due to higher market prices for materials and supplies, fuel and other raw materials. Cost of revenues as a percentage of revenues decreased due to the leverage of higher revenues over direct employment costs and improved pricing for RPC’s services.

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased to $32.1 million in the fourth quarter of 2021 from $26.0 million in the fourth quarter of 2020 due to increases in employment related costs. Selling, general and administrative expenses decreased from 17.5 percent of revenues in the fourth quarter of 2020 to 12.0 percent of revenues in the fourth quarter of 2021 due to leverage of higher revenues over costs that are relatively fixed during the short term.

 

Depreciation and amortization was $18.9 million in the fourth quarter of 2021 compared to $18.0 million in the fourth quarter of the prior year.

 

1 Adjusted operating loss is a financial measure which does not conform to GAAP. Additional disclosure regarding this non-GAAP financial measure and its reconciliation to operating loss, the nearest GAAP financial measure, is disclosed in Appendix A to this press release.

2 Adjusted net loss and adjusted loss per share are financial measures which do not conform to GAAP. Additional disclosure regarding these non-GAAP financial measures and their reconciliation to net loss and loss per share, the nearest GAAP financial measures, are disclosed in Appendix A to this press release.

3 Adjusted EBITDA and EBITDA are financial measures which do not conform to GAAP. Additional disclosure regarding these non-GAAP financial measures and their reconciliation to net income or net loss, the nearest GAAP financial measures, are disclosed in Appendix C to this press release.

 


The following information was filed by Rpc Inc (RES) on Wednesday, January 26, 2022 as an 8K 2.02 statement, which is an earnings press release pertaining to results of operations and financial condition. It may be helpful to assess the quality of management by comparing the information in the press release to the information in the accompanying 10-K Annual Report statement of earnings and operation as management may choose to highlight particular information in the press release.
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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

Annual report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

 

Transition report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021

Commission File No. 1-8726

RPC, INC.

Delaware
(State of Incorporation)

58-1550825
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

2801 BUFORD HIGHWAY NE, SUITE 300

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30329

(404) 321-2140

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class
COMMON STOCK, $0.10 PAR VALUE

Trading Symbol(s)
RES

Name of each exchange on which registered
 NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: NONE

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes No

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every interactive data file required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulations S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes No

The aggregate market value of RPC, Inc. Common Stock held by non-affiliates on June 30, 2021, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, was $355,427,058 based on the closing price on the New York Stock Exchange on June 30, 2021 of $4.95 per share.

RPC, Inc. had 216,586,626 shares of Common Stock outstanding as of February 18, 2022.

Documents Incorporated by Reference

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2022 Annual Meeting of Stockholders of RPC, Inc. are incorporated by reference into Part III, Items 10 through 14 of this report.

PART I

Throughout this report, we refer to RPC, Inc., together with its subsidiaries, as “we,” “us,” “RPC” or “the Company.”

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements made in this report that are not historical facts are “forward-looking statements” under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements may include, without limitation, statements that relate to our business and financial strategies, plans and objectives, and our beliefs and expectations regarding future demand for our equipment and services and other events and conditions that may influence the oilfield services market and our performance in the future. Forward-looking statements made elsewhere in this report also include without limitation statements regarding: our belief that the demand for our oil and gas services is generally influenced by customers’ decisions to invest capital toward initiating production in a new oil or natural gas well, improving production flows in an existing formation, or addressing well control issues; our belief that the common drivers of operational and financial success of Technical Services include diligent equipment maintenance, strong logistical processes, and appropriately trained personnel who function well in a team environment; our belief that the primary drivers of operational success for services and equipment provided off the well site without our personnel are offering safe, high quality and in-demand equipment appropriate for the well design characteristics; our belief that the primary drivers of operational success for other Support Services relate to meeting customer needs off the well site and competitive marketing of such services; our belief that demand for equipment and services offered tends to be influenced primarily by customer drilling-related activity levels; our belief that our supply sources are adequate; our belief that customer activity levels are influenced by their decisions about capital investment toward the development and product of oil and gas reserves; natural gas prices, production levels and drilling activities; our belief that oil-directed drilling will continue to represent the majority of the total drilling rig count for the foreseeable future; our continued belief in the long-term importance of our business due to continued worldwide demand for hydrocarbons generally and the high production of oil in the domestic U.S. market; our belief that unconventional wells will continue to comprise the majority of drilling activity because of their high initial production rates; our belief that the advent of unconventional drilling in the U.S. domestic market will be a permanent change and will continue to have a positive impact on the demand for our services; our expectation to continue to focus on the selected development of international business opportunities in current and other international markets and our belief that international revenues will continue to be less than ten percent of total revenues in 2022; our primary objective, which is to generate excellent long-term returns on investment through the effective and conservative management of our invested capital to generate strong cash flow; our plans to continue to pursue such primary objective through strategic investments and opportunities designed to enhance the long-term value of our company while improving market share, product offerings and the profitability of existing businesses; our expectations regarding acquisition targets in our industry; our belief that the principal competitive factors in the market areas that we serve are product availability and quality of our equipment and raw materials used to provide our services, service quality, reputation for safety and technical proficiency and price; our belief that our facilities are adequate for our current operations and reasonably anticipated future needs; our belief that oil production in the United States has become an increasingly important determinant of global oil prices; our belief that statistics regarding well completions are meaningful indicators of the outlook for our activity levels and revenues; our belief that current and projected prices of oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids are important catalysts for U.S. domestic drilling activity; the adequacy of our insurance coverage; the impact of lawsuits, legal proceedings and claims on our business and financial condition; our belief that recent price increases have encouraged our customers to increase drilling and completion activities; our belief that oil-directed drilling will remain the majority of domestic drilling and that natural gas-directed drilling will remain a low percentage of U.S. domestic drilling in the near-term; our belief that natural gas-directed drilling has increased and will continue to increase in natural gas-directed basins in the United States due to the current and projected high prices of natural gas and our belief that this trend should be favorable for the demand for our services in such basins; our belief that the competitive market for our services will improve during the near term; our belief that our response to the near-term potential of lower activity levels and competitive pricing will allow us to maintain a strong balance sheet and position us for long-term growth and strong financial results;; our belief that the liquidity provided by our cash and cash equivalents and our overall strong capitalization will provide sufficient liquidity to meet our requirements for at least the next twelve months; our expectation that we will not need our revolving credit facility to meet liquidity requirements in the near term; our expectations about cash contributions to the defined benefit pension plan in 2022; our ability to fund capital requirements in the future; the estimated amount of our capital expenditures and contractual obligations for future periods; our expectations to resume payments of cash dividends; our expectations regarding the costs of skilled labor and many of the raw materials used in providing our services; estimates made with respect to our critical accounting policies; the effect of new accounting standards; and the effect of the changes in foreign exchange rates on our consolidated results of operations or financial condition.

The words “may,” “will,” “expect,” “believe,” “anticipate,” “project,” “estimate,” and similar expressions generally identify forward-looking statements. Such statements are based on certain assumptions and analyses made by our management in light of its experience and its perception of historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments and other factors it believes to be appropriate. We caution you that such statements are only predictions and not guarantees of future performance and that actual results, developments and business decisions may differ from those envisioned by the forward-looking statements. See “Risk Factors” contained in Item 1A. for a discussion of factors that may cause actual results to differ from our projections..

2

Item 1. Business

Organization and Overview

RPC is a Delaware corporation originally organized in 1984 as a holding company for several oilfield services companies and is headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia.

RPC provides a broad range of specialized oilfield services and equipment primarily to independent and major oil and gas companies engaged in the exploration, production and development of oil and gas properties throughout the United States, including the southwest, mid-continent, Gulf of Mexico and Appalachian regions, and in selected international markets. RPC acts as a holding company for the following legal entity groupings: Cudd Energy Services, Cudd Pressure Control, Thru Tubing Solutions and Patterson Services. Selected overhead including centralized support services and regulatory compliance are classified as Corporate. RPC is further organized into Technical Services and Support Services which are its operating segments. As of December 31, 2021, RPC had approximately 2,250 employees.

Business Segments

RPC manages its business as either services offered on the well site with equipment and personnel (Technical Services) or services and equipment offered off the well site (Support Services). The businesses under Technical Services generate revenues based on equipment, personnel operating the equipment and the materials utilized to provide the service. They are all managed, analyzed and reported based on the similarities of the operational characteristics and costs associated with providing the service. The businesses under Support Services are primarily able to generate revenues through equipment or services offered off the well site. During 2021, less than five percent of RPC’s consolidated revenues were generated from offshore operations in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. In 2021, we also estimate that 65 percent of our revenues were related to drilling and production activities for oil, while 35 percent of revenues were related to drilling and production activities for natural gas.

Technical Services include RPC’s oil and gas services that utilize people and equipment to perform value-added completion, production and maintenance services directly to a customer’s well. The demand for these services is generally influenced by customers’ decisions to invest capital toward initiating production in a new oil or natural gas well, improving production flows in an existing formation, or to address well control issues. This operating segment consists primarily of pressure pumping, downhole tools, coiled tubing, snubbing, nitrogen, well control, wireline and fishing. Customers include major multi-national and independent oil and gas producers, and selected nationally owned oil companies. The services offered under Technical Services are high capital and personnel intensive businesses. The common drivers of operational and financial success of these services include diligent equipment maintenance, strong logistical processes, and appropriately trained personnel who function well in a team environment. The Company considers all of these services to be closely integrated oil and gas well servicing businesses, and makes resource allocation and performance assessment decisions based on this operating segment as a whole across these various services. The principal markets for this business segment include the United States, including the southwest, mid-continent, Gulf of Mexico and Appalachian regions, and selected international markets.

Support Services include all of the services that provide (i) equipment offered off the well site without RPC personnel and (ii) services that are provided in support of customer operations off the well site such as classroom and computer training, and other consulting services. The primary drivers of operational success for services and equipment provided off the well site without RPC personnel are offering safe, high quality and in-demand equipment appropriate for the well design characteristics. The drivers of operational success for the other Support Services relate to meeting customer needs off the well site and competitive marketing of such services. The equipment and services offered include rental tools, drill pipe and related tools, pipe handling, pipe inspection and storage services, and oilfield training and consulting services. The demand for these services tends to be influenced primarily by customer drilling-related activity levels. The principal markets for this segment include the United States, including the Gulf of Mexico, mid-continent and Appalachian regions and project work in selected international locations. Customers primarily include domestic operations of independent oil and gas producers and major multi-nationals and selected nationally owned oil companies.

A brief description of the primary services conducted within each of the operating segments follows:

Technical Services

Pressure Pumping. Pressure pumping services, which accounted for 43 percent of 2021 revenues, 37 percent of 2020 revenues and 42 percent of 2019 revenues are provided to customers throughout Texas, and the mid-continent regions of the United States. We primarily provide these services to customers to enhance the initial production of hydrocarbons in formations that have low permeability. Pressure pumping services involve using complex, truck or skid-mounted equipment designed and constructed for each specific pumping service offered. The mobility of this equipment permits pressure pumping services to be performed in varying geographic areas. Principal materials utilized in pressure pumping operations include fracturing proppants, acid and bulk chemical

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additives. Generally, these items are available from several suppliers, and the Company utilizes more than one supplier for each item. Pressure pumping services offered include:

Fracturing — Fracturing services are performed to stimulate production of oil and natural gas by increasing the permeability of a formation. Fracturing is particularly important in shale formations, which have low permeability, and unconventional completion, because the formation containing hydrocarbons is not concentrated in one area and requires multiple fracturing operations. The fracturing process consists of pumping fluids and sometimes nitrogen into a cased well at sufficient pressure to fracture the formation at desired locations and depths. Sand, ceramics, or synthetic materials, which are often coated with a material to increase their resistance to crushing, are pumped into the fracture. When the pressure is released at the surface, the fluid returns to the well surface, but the proppant remains in the fracture, thus keeping it open to allow oil and natural gas to flow through the fracture into the production tubing and ultimately to the well surface. In some cases, fracturing is performed in formations with a high amount of carbonate rock by an acid solution pumped under pressure without a proppant or with small amounts of proppant.

Acidizing — Acidizing services are also performed to stimulate production of oil and natural gas, but they are used in wells that have undergone formation damage due to the buildup of various materials that block the formation. Acidizing entails pumping large volumes of specially formulated acids into reservoirs to dissolve barriers and enlarge crevices in the formation, thereby eliminating obstacles to the flow of oil and natural gas. Acidizing services can also enhance production in limestone formations. Acid is also frequently used in the beginning of a fracturing operation.

Cementing — Cementing services are used at the completion stage of an oil or natural gas well to seal the wellbore after the casing string has been run. The process of cementing includes developing a cement slurry formulated for a well’s unique characteristics, pumping the cement through the wellbore and into the space between the well casing and well bore, and allowing it to harden. In addition to completion uses, cementing can also be used to seal a lost circulation zone in an existing well, and to plug a well at the end of its life cycle.

Downhole Tools. Thru Tubing Solutions (“TTS”) accounted for 29 percent of revenues in 2021, 34 percent of revenues in 2020 and 34 percent of 2019 revenues. TTS provides services and proprietary downhole motors, fishing tools and other specialized downhole tools and processes to operators and service companies in drilling and production operations, including casing perforation and bridge plug drilling at the completion stage of an oil or gas well. The services that TTS provides are especially suited for unconventional drilling and completion activities. TTS’ experience providing reliable tool services allows it to work in a pressurized environment with virtually any coiled tubing unit or snubbing unit.

Coiled Tubing. Coiled tubing services, which accounted for ten percent of revenues in 2021, nine percent of revenues in 2020 and seven percent of revenues in 2019, involve the injection of coiled tubing into wells to perform various applications and functions for use principally in well-servicing operations and to facilitate completion of horizontal wells. Coiled tubing is a flexible steel pipe with a diameter of less than four inches manufactured in continuous lengths of thousands of feet and wound or coiled around a large reel. It can be inserted through existing production tubing and used to perform workovers without using a larger, costlier workover rig. Principal advantages of employing coiled tubing in a workover operation include: (i) not having to “shut-in” the well during such operations, (ii) the ability to reel continuous coiled tubing in and out of a well significantly faster than conventional pipe, (iii) the ability to direct fluids into a wellbore with more precision, and (iv) enhanced access to remote or offshore fields due to the smaller size and mobility of a coiled tubing unit compared to a workover rig. Coiled tubing units are also used to support completion activities in directional and horizontal wells. Such completion activities usually require multiple entrances in a wellbore to complete multiple fractures during a pressure pumping operation. A coiled tubing unit can accomplish this type of operation because its flexibility allows it to be steered in a direction other than vertical, which is necessary in this type of wellbore. At the same time, the strength of the coiled tubing string allows various types of tools or motors to be conveyed into the well effectively. The uses for coiled tubing in directional and horizontal wells have been enhanced by improved fabrication techniques and higher-diameter coiled tubing which allows coiled tubing units to be used effectively over greater distances, thus allowing them to function in more of the completion activities currently taking place in the U.S. domestic market. There are several manufacturers of flexible steel pipe used in coiled tubing, and the Company believes that its sources of supply are adequate.

Snubbing. Snubbing (also referred to as hydraulic workover services), which accounted for two percent of revenues in 2021, one percent of revenues in 2020 and one percent of revenues in 2019, involves using a hydraulic workover rig that permits an operator to repair damaged casing, production tubing and downhole production equipment in a high-pressure environment. A snubbing unit makes it possible to remove and replace downhole equipment while maintaining pressure on the well. Customers benefit because these operations can be performed without removing the pressure from the well, which stops production and can damage the formation, and because a snubbing unit can perform many applications at a lower cost than other alternatives. Because the well being serviced by a hydraulic workover unit is often under pressure, which is hazardous by nature, the snubbing segment of the oil and gas services industry is limited to relatively few operators who have the experience and knowledge required to perform such services safely. Increasingly, snubbing units are used for unconventional completions at the outer reaches of long wellbores which cannot be serviced by coiled tubing because coiled tubing has a more limited range than drill pipe conveyed by a snubbing unit.

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Nitrogen. Nitrogen accounted for four percent of revenues in 2021, five percent of revenues in 2020 and four percent of revenues in 2019. There are a number of uses for nitrogen, an inert, non-combustible element, in providing services to oilfield customers and industrial users outside of the oilfield. For our oilfield customers, nitrogen can be used to clean drilling and production pipe and displace fluids in various drilling applications. Increasingly, it is used as a displacement medium to increase production in older wells in which production has depleted. It also can be used to create a fire-retardant environment in hazardous blowout situations and as a fracturing medium for our fracturing service. In addition, nitrogen can be complementary to our snubbing and coiled tubing services, because it is a non-corrosive medium and is frequently injected into a well using coiled tubing. Nitrogen is complementary to our pressure pumping service as well, because foam-based nitrogen stimulation is appropriate in certain sensitive formations in which the fluids used in fracturing or acidizing would damage a customer's well.

For non-oilfield industrial users, nitrogen can be used to purge pipelines and create a non-combustible environment. RPC stores and transports nitrogen and has a number of pumping unit configurations that inject nitrogen in its various applications. Some of these pumping units are set up for use on offshore platforms or inland waters. RPC purchases its nitrogen in liquid form from several suppliers and believes that these sources of supply are adequate.

Well Control. Cudd Pressure Control specializes in responding to and controlling oil and gas well emergencies, including blowouts and well fires, domestically and internationally. In connection with these services, Cudd Pressure Control, along with Patterson Services, has the capacity to supply the equipment, expertise and personnel necessary to restore affected oil and gas wells to production. During the past several years, the Company has responded to numerous well control situations in the domestic U.S. oilfield and in various international locations.

The Company’s professional firefighting staff has many years of aggregate industry experience in responding to well fires and blowouts. This team of experts responds to well control situations where hydrocarbons are escaping from a wellbore, regardless of whether a fire has occurred. In the most critical situations, there are explosive fires, the destruction of drilling and production facilities, substantial environmental damage and the loss of hundreds of thousands of dollars per day in well operators’ production revenue. Since these events ordinarily arise from equipment failures or human error, it is impossible to predict accurately the timing or scope of this work. Additionally, less critical events frequently occur in connection with the drilling of new wells in high-pressure reservoirs. In these situations, the Company is called upon to supervise and assist in the well control effort so that drilling operations can resume as promptly as safety permits.

Wireline Services. Wireline is classified into two types of services: slick or braided line and electric line. In both, a spooled wire is unwound and lowered into a well, conveying various types of tools or equipment. Slick or braided line services use a non-conductive line primarily for jarring objects into or out of a well, as in fishing or plug-setting operations. Electric line services lower an electrical conductor line into a well allowing the use of electrically-operated tools such as perforators, bridge plugs and logging tools. Wireline services can be an integral part of the plug and abandonment process near the end of the life cycle of a well.

Pump Down Services. Pump down services are an integral part of the well completion process and are critical in multiple-stage, unconventional well completions which use various types of bridge plugs and perforation techniques. Pump down services use fluids and low-capacity pressure pumping equipment, and work in coordination with wireline services, to place completion equipment at the desired location in a well bore. This process is repeated for each stage, moving from the most distant end of the wellbore to the end that is closest to the wellhead.

Fishing. Fishing involves the use of specialized tools and procedures to retrieve lost equipment from a well drilling operation and producing wells. It is a service required by oil and gas operators who have lost equipment in a well. Oil and natural gas production from an affected well typically declines until the lost equipment can be retrieved. In some cases, the Company creates customized tools to perform a fishing operation. The customized tools are maintained by the Company after the particular fishing job for future use if a similar need arises.

Support Services

Rental Tools. Rental tools accounted for four percent of revenues in 2021, four percent of revenues in 2020 and four percent of revenues in 2019. The Company rents specialized equipment for use with onshore and offshore oil and gas well drilling, completion and workover activities. The drilling and subsequent operation of oil and gas wells generally require a variety of equipment. The equipment needed is in large part determined by the geological features of the production zone and the size of the well itself. As a result, operators and drilling contractors often find it more economical to supplement their tool and tubular assets with rental items instead of owning a complete set of assets. The Company’s facilities are strategically located to serve the major staging points for oil and gas activities in Texas, the Gulf of Mexico, mid-continent region and the Appalachian region.

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Patterson Rental Tools offers a broad range of rental tools including drill pipe and associated handling tools, blowout preventers and a variety of tool assemblages that provide well control.

Oilfield Pipe Inspection Services, Pipe Management and Pipe Storage. Pipe inspection services include Full Body Electromagnetic and Phased Array Ultrasonic inspection of pipe used in oil and gas wells. These services are provided at both the Company’s inspection facilities and at independent tubular mills in accordance with negotiated sales and/or service contracts. Our customers are major oil companies and steel mills, for which we provide in-house inspection services, inventory management and process control of tubing, casing and drill pipe. Our locations in Channelview, Texas and Morgan City, Louisiana are equipped with large capacity cranes, specially designed forklifts and a computerized inventory system to serve a variety of storage and handling services for both oilfield and non-oilfield customers.

Well Control School. Well Control School provides industry and government accredited training for the oil and gas industry both in the United States and in limited international locations. Well Control School provides training in various formats including conventional classroom training, interactive computer training including training delivered over the internet, and mobile simulator training.

Refer to Note 15 in the consolidated financial statements for additional financial information on our business segments.

Industry

United States. RPC provides its services to its domestic customers through a network of facilities strategically located to serve oil and gas drilling and production activities of its customers in Texas, the mid-continent, the southwest, the Gulf of Mexico and the Appalachian regions. Demand for RPC’s services in the U.S. is extremely volatile and fluctuates with current and projected price levels of oil and natural gas and activity levels in the oil and gas industry. Customer activity levels are influenced by their decisions about capital investment toward the development and production of oil and gas reserves.

Due to improved drilling technology, the drilling rig count in the U.S. has declined dramatically since the early 1980’s. Due to continuously enhanced rig and other technologies during the last decade, an increased number of wells have been drilled during periods of strong industry activity, and the domestic production of both oil and natural gas in these wells rose to record levels in 2019. Oil and gas industry activity levels have historically been volatile, experiencing multiple cycles, including seven down cycle troughs between 1981 and 2020, with August 2020 marking the lowest U.S. domestic rig count in U.S. oilfield history. Between August 2020 and early in the first quarter of 2022, the U.S. domestic rig count rose by approximately 138 percent.

Since the majority of RPC’s services are utilized at the completion stage of an oil or gas well’s life cycle, the Company closely monitors well completion trends in the U.S. domestic oilfield. As recently reported by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, annual well completions fell from a cyclical peak of 21,382 in 2014 to 8,135 in 2016. Between 2016 and 2019, annual well completions increased by 6,227 or 76.6 percent. During the oilfield downturn that occurred in 2020, only 7,387 wells were completed, the lowest number of annual well completions recorded during the seven years that these data have been reported. During 2021, reported well completions increased to 9,810, an increase of 2,423 wells or 32.8 percent compared to 2020.

Historical fluctuations in domestic drilling and completions activity are consistent with the prices of oil and natural gas, global supply and demand for oil and natural gas, the domestic supply of natural gas, capital availability to fund the operations of exploration and production companies, projected near-term economic growth and fluctuations in the value of the U.S. dollar on world currency markets. Following the most recent cyclical peak in the fourth quarter of 2018, the price of oil fell by approximately 25 percent by the first quarter of 2020. During 2020, the historic collapse in oil prices discouraged drilling and production activity as our customers faced a potential collapse in global oil demand. Fluctuations in the prices of these commodities, particularly the price of oil, significantly impact RPC’s financial results.

The average price of natural gas increased by approximately 93 percent during 2021 as compared with 2020. Early in the first quarter of 2022, the price of natural gas was approximately 19.9 percent higher than the price at the end of 2021. RPC believes that the recent increase in the price of natural gas is sufficient to encourage increasing levels of natural gas-directed drilling, and we note that many oil-directed wells produce a great deal of natural gas and natural gas liquids as well. In addition to oil and natural gas, the prices of various natural gas liquids also determine our customers’ activity levels, since it is produced in many of the shale resource plays which also produce oil, and production of various natural gas liquids has increased to a level comparable to that of natural gas. During 2021 the average price of benchmark natural gas liquids increased by approximately 97 percent compared with 2020. Early in the first quarter of 2022, the price of natural gas liquids increased by approximately 7.0 percent compared to the average price in 2021.

From 2001 to 2009, gas drilling rigs represented over 80 percent of the drilling rig count. In 2010, the percentage of drilling rigs drilling for natural gas began to decline, and since that time has consistently comprised less than 50 percent of total U.S. drilling.

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Although U.S. domestic demand for natural gas has increased, and U.S. exports of liquified natural gas have become a source of demand for U.S. natural gas, the price of natural gas generally has fallen in recent years. Unlike oil demand, which is impacted by numerous global factors, the demand for natural gas is determined by U.S. domestic and export demand. We anticipate that oil-directed drilling will continue to represent the majority of the total drilling rig count for the foreseeable future. We continue to believe in the long-term importance of our business due to continued worldwide demand for hydrocarbons generally and the high production of oil in the domestic U.S. market.

Unconventional wells are drilled in a direction other than a straight vertical direction from the Earth’s surface. Because they are drilled through relatively impermeable formations such as shale, they require additional stimulation when they are completed. Also, many of these formations require high pumping rates of stimulation fluids under high pressures, which can only be accomplished by using a great deal of pressure pumping horsepower to complete the well. Furthermore, since these types of wells are not drilled in a straight vertical direction, they require tools and drilling mechanisms that are flexible, rather than rigid, and can be steered once they are downhole. For these reasons, unconventional wells require more of RPC’s services than conventional wells. Specifically, these types of wells require RPC’s pressure pumping and coiled tubing services, as well as our downhole tools and services. Since 2016, unconventional oil and gas wells have comprised greater than 80 percent of U.S. domestic drilling and RPC believes that they will continue to comprise the majority of drilling activity because of their high initial production rates. The advent of unconventional drilling in the U.S. domestic market, which RPC believes to be a permanent change, continues to have a positive impact on the demand for RPC’s services.

International. RPC has historically operated in several countries outside of the United States, and international revenues accounted for four percent of RPC’s consolidated revenues in 2021, six percent in 2020 and five percent in 2019. RPC’s allocation of growth capital over the last several years have emphasized domestic rather than international expansion because of higher domestic activity levels and expected financial returns. International revenues decreased 13.0 percent in 2021 compared to the prior year primarily due to lower customer activity levels in Algeria and Saudi Arabia, partially offset by higher activity in Canada. During 2021, RPC provided downhole motors and tools in Argentina, Canada, Mexico and Saudi Arabia. We continue to focus on the selected development of international opportunities in these and other markets, although we believe that it will continue to be less than ten percent of total revenues in 2022.

RPC provides services to its international customers through branch locations or wholly owned foreign subsidiaries. The international market is prone to political uncertainties, including the risk of civil unrest and conflicts. However, due to the significant investment requirement and complexity of international projects, customers’ drilling decisions relating to such projects tend to be evaluated and monitored with a longer-term perspective with regard to oil and natural gas pricing, and therefore have the potential to be more stable than most U.S. domestic operations. Additionally, the international market is dominated by major oil companies and national oil companies which tend to have different objectives and more operating stability than the typical independent oil and gas producer in the U.S. Predicting the timing and duration of contract work is not possible. Refer to Note 15 in the consolidated financial statements for further information on our international operations.

Growth Strategies

RPC’s primary objective is to generate excellent long-term returns on investment through the effective and conservative management of its invested capital to generate strong cash flow. This objective continues to be pursued through strategic investments and opportunities designed to enhance the long-term value of RPC while improving market share, product offerings and the profitability of existing businesses. Growth strategies are focused on selected customers and markets in which we believe there exist opportunities for higher growth, customer and market penetration, or enhanced returns achieved through consolidations or through providing proprietary value-added equipment and services. RPC intends to focus on specific market segments in which it believes that it has a competitive advantage and on potential large customers who have a long-term need for our services in markets in which we operate.

RPC seeks to expand its service capabilities through a combination of internal growth, acquisitions, joint ventures and strategic alliances. Historically, we have found that we generate higher financial returns from organic growth with our services and geographical locations in which we have experience. Because of the fragmented nature of the oil and gas services industry, RPC believes a number of acquisition opportunities exist, and we frequently consider such opportunities. We have consummated relatively few acquisitions in recent years, however, due to high seller valuation expectations and the risk of integrating acquired businesses into our existing operations. We will continue to consider the acquisitions of existing businesses but will also continue to maintain a conservative capital structure, which may limit our ability to consummate large transactions.

RPC has a revolving credit facility which can be used to fund working capital and other capital requirements. The borrowing base for this credit facility is $100 million, including a $35 million letter of credit sublimit, and a $35 million swingline sublimit. There was

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no outstanding balance on this credit facility as of December 31, 2021. Our capital structure is more conservative than that of many of our peers.

Customers

Demand for RPC’s services and equipment depends primarily upon the number of oil and natural gas wells being drilled, the depth and drilling conditions of such wells, the number of well completions and the level of production enhancement activity worldwide. RPC’s principal customers consist of major and independent oil and natural gas producing companies. During 2021, RPC provided oilfield services to several hundred customers. Of these customers, there was no customer in 2021 or 2020 that accounted for 10 percent or more of revenues.

Sales are generated by RPC’s sales force and through referrals from existing customers. We monitor closely the financial condition of these customers, their capital expenditure plans, and other indications of their drilling and completion activities. Due to the short lead time between ordering services or equipment and providing services or delivering equipment, there is no significant sales backlog.

Competition

RPC operates in highly competitive areas of the oilfield services industry. We sell our equipment and services in highly competitive markets, and the revenues and earnings generated are affected by changes in prices for our services, fluctuations in the level of customer activity in major markets, general economic conditions and governmental regulation. RPC competes with many large and small oilfield industry competitors, including the largest integrated oilfield services companies. During the oilfield downturn that began in 2015, a number of oilfield services companies reduced the scope of their operations or became insolvent. During the most recent downturn that began in 2019, fewer oilfield services companies became insolvent than in the previous downturn, partially because of COVID-19 – related Federal stimulus that supported operations that would otherwise have become insolvent. Oilfield activity levels began to improve during the fourth quarter of 2020, and pricing for our services began to improve during the fourth quarter of 2021, both of which supported the operations of oilfield services companies that remained in operation. In addition, improving completion services efficiency during this period served to increase effective capacity and impose another catalyst for declining pricing and utilization. The combination of a large number of oilfield services companies and the increased efficiency with which these companies provide services have caused the oilfield services business to remain competitive. RPC believes that the principal competitive factors in the market areas that it serves are product availability and quality of our equipment and raw materials used to provide our services, service quality, reputation for safety and technical proficiency, and price.

The oil and gas services industry includes dominant global competitors including, among others, Halliburton Energy Services Group, a division of Halliburton Company, Baker Hughes Company, and Schlumberger Ltd. The industry also includes a number of other publicly traded peers whose operations are more similar to RPC, including Liberty Oilfield Services, Mammoth Energy Services, Inc., NCS Multistage Holdings, Inc., NexTier Oilfield Solutions, Nine Energy Services, Patterson-UTI Energy, Inc. and ProPetro Holding Corporation, as well as numerous smaller, locally owned competitors.

Human Capital

The table below shows the number of employees at December 31, 2021 and 2020:

At December 31,

    

2021

    

2020

Employees

 

2,250

 

2,005

The Company operates in a cyclical business where financial performance and headcount is influenced by, among other things, changes in oil and natural gas prices. The Company’s key human capital management objectives are focused on fostering talent in the following areas:

Diversity and Equality - The Company’s workforce reflects the diversity of the communities in which it operates. Our dedicated team of employees works towards a common purpose. Our Company is strong in its values, relationships and consistency in management. We have long been dedicated to recruiting and hiring recently discharged military personnel, and dedicated resources undertake this recruiting effort at our company. The Company received the U.S. Department of Labor's "2019 Hire Vets Medallion Award" in recognition of this effort and its success. The Board of Directors has a Human Capital Management and Compensation Committee that monitors compliance with applicable non-discrimination laws related to race, gender and other protected classes. The Committee provides a report of such incidences to the Board on an annual basis.

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Development and Training - The Company’s management team and all its employees are expected to exhibit and promote honest, ethical and respectful conduct in the workplace. We have implemented and maintained a corporate compliance program to provide guidance for everyone associated with the Company, including its employees, officers and directors (the "Code"). Annual review of the Code is required, and the code prohibits unlawful or unethical activity, including discrimination, and directs our employees, officers, and directors to avoid actions that, even if not unlawful or unethical, might create an appearance of illegality or impropriety. In addition, the Company provides annual training for preventing, identifying, reporting and ending any type of unlawful discrimination. The Company also provides a wide variety of opportunities for professional growth for all employees with in-classroom and online training, on-the-job experience and counseling.

Compensation and Benefits - The Company focuses on attracting and retaining employees by providing compensation and benefit packages that are competitive in the market, taking into account the location and responsibilities of the job. We provide competitive financial benefits such as a 401(k) retirement plan with a company match, and generally grant awards of restricted stock for certain of our salaried employees. We provide our employees and their families with access to a variety of innovative, flexible and convenient health and wellness programs that support their physical and mental health by providing tools and resources to help them improve or maintain their health status.

RPC has always believed in the long-term value of education, and has demonstrated this belief through a college scholarship program for the children of employees. This program, which awards four-year college scholarships based on merit, parents' tenure, and need has invested more than $1 million to support hundreds of children of employees as they earn college degrees. A number of these college graduates have come to work for RPC and have followed their parents to become valuable employees.

RPC and its subsidiaries have regularly participated in efforts to support the communities in which we live. We have participated in the United Way Campaign in the city in which our corporate headquarters is located for more than 30 years. In addition, we have sponsored several emergency relief efforts following natural disasters, such as hurricanes and tornados, in communities in which our field offices are located.

Safety - The Company adheres to a comprehensive safety program to promote a safe working environment for its employees, contractors and customers at its operational locations and active job sites. This program complies with applicable regulatory guidelines for oilfield operations and is enhanced by our analysis of workplace-related incidents and evolving preventative measures. We monitor our workplace safety record and compare it to industry benchmarks and our internal metrics to find areas for improvement. In addition, a component of our field employee compensation plans is based on safety measures.

RPC is making technology and process investments which reduce the number of employees on a job location and change the roles of the remaining employees in ways that reduce their exposure to safety hazards. We believe that this reduced exposure to active areas of a job location has led to fewer safety incidents in a service line which has a high concentration of employees.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we implemented a response plan that we believe was in the best interest of our employees and the communities in which we operate. This included transitioning our workforce to a remote work model where possible, while implementing additional safety measures for essential employees continuing critical on-site work.

Facilities/Equipment

RPC’s equipment consists primarily of oil and gas services equipment used either in servicing customer wells or provided on a rental basis for customer use. Substantially all of this equipment is Company owned. RPC purchases oilfield service equipment from a limited number of manufacturers. These manufacturers may not be able to meet our requests for timely delivery during periods of high demand which may result in delayed deliveries of equipment and higher prices for equipment.

RPC owns and leases regional and district facilities from which its oilfield services are provided to land-based and offshore customers. RPC’s principal executive offices in Atlanta, Georgia are leased. The Company has four primary administrative buildings, two leased facilities, one in each of The Woodlands, Texas, and Midland, Texas, that include the Company’s operations, engineering, sales and marketing headquarters, and two owned facilities, one in Houma, Louisiana that includes certain administrative functions and one in Newcastle, Oklahoma that includes certain administrative functions, operations, engineering, sales and equipment storage yards. RPC believes that its facilities are adequate for its current operations. For additional information with respect to RPC’s lease commitments, see Note 16 of the consolidated Financial Statements.

Governmental Regulation

RPC’s business is affected by state, federal and foreign laws and other regulations relating to the oil and gas industry, as well as laws and regulations relating to worker safety and environmental protection. RPC cannot predict the level of enforcement of existing

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laws and regulations or how such laws and regulations may be interpreted by enforcement agencies or court rulings, whether additional laws and regulations will be adopted, or the effect such changes may have on it, its businesses or financial condition. More stringent environmental standards compel the Company to buy more expensive equipment to meet those standards and also renders older equipment obsolete.

In addition, our customers are affected by laws and regulations relating to the exploration and production of natural resources such as oil and natural gas. These regulations are subject to change, and new regulations may curtail or eliminate our customers’ activities. We cannot determine the extent to which new legislation may impact our customers’ activity levels, and ultimately, the demand for our services.

Intellectual Property

RPC uses several patented items in its operations which management believes are important, but are not indispensable, to RPC’s success. Although RPC anticipates seeking patent protection when possible, it relies to a greater extent on the technical expertise and know-how of its personnel to maintain its competitive position.

Availability of Filings

RPC makes available, free of charge, on its website, rpc.net, its annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports on the same day they are filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Item 1A. Risk Factors

Risks Related to our Business.

Demand for our equipment and services is affected by the volatility of oil and natural gas prices.

Oil and natural gas prices affect demand throughout the oil and gas industry, including the demand for our equipment and services. Our business depends in large part on the conditions of the oil and gas industry, and specifically on the capital investments of our customers related to the exploration and production of oil and natural gas. When these capital investments decline, our customers’ demand for our services declines.

The price of oil, a world-wide commodity, is affected by, among other things, the potential of armed conflict in politically unstable areas such as the Middle East as well as the actions of OPEC, an oil cartel which controls approximately 40 percent of global oil production. OPEC’s actions have historically been unpredictable and can contribute to the volatility of the price of oil on the world market.

Although the production sector of the oil and gas industry is less immediately affected by changing prices, and, as a result, less volatile than the exploration sector, producers react to declining oil and gas prices by curtailing capital spending, which would adversely affect our business. A prolonged low level of customer activity in the oil and gas industry adversely affects the demand for our equipment and services and our financial condition and results of operations.

Reliance upon a large customer may adversely affect our revenues and operating results.

At times our business has had a concentration of one or more major customers. There was no customer that accounted for 10 percent or more of the Company’s revenues in 2021, 2020 or 2019. In addition, there was no customer as of December 31, 2021 or 2020 that accounted for 10 percent or more of accounts receivable. The reliance on a large customer for a significant portion of our total revenues exposes us to the risk that the loss or reduction in revenues from this customer, which could occur unexpectedly, could have a material and disproportionate adverse impact upon our revenues and operating results.

Our concentration of customers in one industry and periodic downturns may impact our overall exposure to credit risk and cause us to experience increased credit loss allowance for accounts receivable.

Substantially all of our customers operate in the energy industry. This concentration of customers in one industry may impact our overall exposure to credit risk, either positively or negatively, in that customers may be similarly affected by changes in economic and industry conditions. We perform ongoing credit evaluations of our customers and do not generally require collateral in support of our trade receivables. The periodic downturns that our industry experiences may adversely affect our customers' operations which could cause us to experience increased credit losses for accounts receivable.

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Our business depends on capital spending by our customers, many of whom rely on outside financing to fund their operations.

Many of our customers rely on their ability to raise equity capital and debt financing from capital markets to fund their operations. Their ability to raise outside capital depends upon, among other things, the availability of capital, near-term operating prospects of oil and gas companies, current and projected prices of oil and natural gas, and relative attractiveness of competing investments for available investment capital. These factors are outside of our control, and in the event our customers cannot continue to raise outside capital to fund their operations, RPC’s financial results would be negatively impacted.

RPC’s success will depend on its key personnel, and the loss of any key personnel may affect its revenues.

RPC’s success will depend to a significant extent on the continued service of key management personnel. The loss or interruption of the services of any senior management personnel or the inability to attract and retain other qualified management, sales, marketing and technical employees could disrupt RPC’s operations and cause a decrease in its revenues and profit margins.

We may be unable to compete in the highly competitive oil and gas industry in the future.

We operate in highly competitive areas of the oilfield services industry. The equipment and services in our industry segments are sold in highly competitive markets, and our revenues and earnings have in the past been affected by changes in competitive prices, fluctuations in the level of activity in major markets and general economic conditions. We compete with the oil and gas industry’s many large and small industry competitors, including the largest integrated oilfield service providers. We believe that the principal competitive factors in the market areas that we serve are product and service quality and availability, reputation for safety, technical proficiency and price. Although we believe that our reputation for safety and quality service is good, we cannot assure you that we will be able to maintain our competitive position.

We may be unable to identify or complete acquisitions.

Acquisitions have been and may continue to be a key element of our business strategy. We cannot assure you that we will be able to identify and acquire acceptable acquisition candidates on terms favorable to us in the future. We may be required to incur substantial indebtedness to finance future acquisitions and also may issue equity securities in connection with such acquisitions. The issuance of additional equity securities could result in significant dilution to our stockholders. We cannot assure you that we will be able to integrate successfully the operations and assets of any acquired business with our own business. Any inability on our part to integrate and manage the growth from acquired businesses could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Our operations are affected by adverse weather conditions.

Our operations are directly affected by the weather conditions in several domestic regions, including the Gulf of Mexico, the Gulf Coast, the mid-continent and the Appalachian region. Hurricanes and other storms prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico and along the Gulf Coast during certain times of the year may also affect our operations, and severe hurricanes may affect our customers' activities for a period of several years. While the impact of these storms may increase the need for certain of our services over a longer period of time, such storms can also decrease our customers' activities immediately after they occur. Such hurricanes may also affect the prices of oil and natural gas by disrupting supplies in the short term, which may increase demand for our services in geographic areas not damaged by the storms. Prolonged rain, snow or ice in many of our locations may temporarily prevent our crews and equipment from reaching customer work sites. Due to seasonal differences in weather patterns, our crews may operate more days in some periods than others. Accordingly, our operating results may vary from quarter to quarter, depending on the impact of these weather conditions.

Our ability to attract and retain skilled workers may impact growth potential and profitability.

Our ability to be productive and profitable will depend substantially on our ability to attract and retain skilled workers. Our ability to expand our operations is, in part, impacted by our ability to increase our labor force. A significant increase in the wages paid by competing employers could result in a reduction in our skilled labor force, increases in the wage rates paid by us, or both. Early in the first quarter of 2022, the Company and our industry is being affected by shortages of skilled labor. If labor shortages continue or a significant increase in wages occur, our capacity and profitability could be diminished, and our growth potential could be impaired.

Some of our equipment and several types of materials used in providing our services are available from a limited number of suppliers.

We purchase equipment provided by a limited number of manufacturers who specialize in oilfield service equipment. During periods of high demand, these manufacturers may not be able to meet our requests for timely delivery, resulting in delayed deliveries

11

of equipment and higher prices for equipment. There are a limited number of suppliers for certain materials used in pressure pumping services, our largest service line. While these materials are generally available, supply disruptions can occur due to factors beyond our control. Such disruptions, delayed deliveries, and higher prices may limit our ability to provide services, or increase the costs of providing services, which could reduce our revenues and profits.

We have used outside financing in prior years to accomplish our growth strategy, and outside financing may become unavailable or may be unfavorable to us.

Our business requires a great deal of capital to maintain our equipment and increase our fleet of equipment to expand our operations, and we have access to our credit facility to fund our necessary working capital and other capital requirements. Our credit facility, as amended September 25, 2020, provides a borrowing base of $100 million less the amount of any outstanding letters of credit, and bears interest at a floating rate, which exposes us to market risks as interest rates rise. If our existing capital resources become unavailable, inadequate or unfavorable for purposes of funding our capital requirements, we would need to raise additional funds through alternative debt or equity financings to maintain our equipment and continue our growth. Such additional financing sources may not be available when we need them, or may not be available on favorable terms. If we fund our growth through the issuance of public equity, the holdings of stockholders will be diluted. If capital generated either by cash provided by operating activities or outside financing is not available or sufficient for our needs, we may be unable to maintain our equipment, expand our fleet of equipment, or take advantage of other potentially profitable business opportunities, which could reduce our future revenues and profits.

Our international operations could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our operations in various international markets including, but not limited to, Africa, Canada, Argentina, China, Mexico, Eastern Europe, Latin America and the Middle East are subject to risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, political changes, expropriation, currency restrictions and changes in currency exchange rates, taxes, boycotts and other civil disturbances. The occurrence of any one of these events could have a material adverse effect on our operations.

Our financial results could continue to be negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The oil and gas industry experienced an unprecedented disruption during 2020 due to the substantial decline in global oil demand caused partly by the COVID-19 pandemic. Although global demand began to rebound in 2021, a worsening of the pandemic could continue to impact the economic conditions in the United States, as federal, state and local governments react to the public health crisis, creating uncertainties in the United States, as well as the global economy. RPC instituted strict procedures to assess employee health and safety while in its facilities or on operational locations and attempted to hire redundant crews in order to continue to provide services to its customers. These measures increased the Company’s operating expenses, and such higher operating expenses could continue if the COVID-19 pandemic continues during 2022.

Risk Management Risks.

Our business has potential liability for litigation, personal injury and property damage claims assessments.

Our operations involve the use of heavy equipment and exposure to inherent risks, including blowouts, explosions and fires. If any of these events were to occur, it could result in liability for personal injury and property damage, pollution or other environmental hazards or loss of production. Litigation may arise from a catastrophic occurrence at a location where our equipment and services are used. This litigation could result in large claims for damages. The frequency and severity of such incidents will affect our operating costs, insurability and relationships with customers, employees and regulators. These occurrences could have a material adverse effect on us. We maintain what we believe is prudent insurance protection. We cannot assure you that we will be able to maintain adequate insurance in the future at rates we consider reasonable or that our insurance coverage will be adequate to cover future claims and assessments that may arise.

Our operations may be adversely affected if we are unable to comply with regulations and environmental laws.

Our business is significantly affected by stringent environmental laws and other regulations relating to the oil and gas industry and by changes in such laws and the level of enforcement of such laws. We are unable to predict the level of enforcement of existing laws and regulations, how such laws and regulations may be interpreted by enforcement agencies or court rulings, or whether additional laws and regulations will be adopted. The adoption of laws and regulations curtailing exploration and development of oil and gas fields in our areas of operations for economic, environmental or other policy reasons would adversely affect our operations by limiting demand for our services. We also have potential environmental liabilities with respect to our offshore and onshore operations, and could be liable for cleanup costs, or environmental and natural resource damage due to conduct that was lawful at the time it

12

occurred, but is later ruled to be unlawful. We also may be subject to claims for personal injury and property damage due to the generation of hazardous substances in connection with our operations. We believe that our present operations substantially comply with applicable federal and state pollution control and environmental protection laws and regulations. We also believe that compliance with such laws has had no material adverse effect on our operations to date. However, such environmental laws are changed frequently. We are unable to predict whether environmental laws will, in the future, materially adversely affect our operations and financial condition. Penalties for noncompliance with these laws may include cancellation of permits, fines, and other corrective actions, which would negatively affect our future financial results.

Compliance with federal and state regulations relating to hydraulic fracturing could increase our operating costs, cause operational delays, and could reduce or eliminate the demand for our pressure pumping services.

RPC’s pressure pumping services are the subject of continuing federal, state and local regulatory oversight. This scrutiny is prompted in part by public concern regarding the potential impact on drinking and ground water and other environmental issues arising from the growing use of hydraulic fracturing. Among these regulatory entities is the White House Council on Environmental Quality, which coordinated a review of hydraulic fracturing practices. In addition, a committee of the United States House of Representatives investigated hydraulic fracturing practices and publicized information regarding the materials used in hydraulic fracturing. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also conducted a study of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing practices, and in 2015, issued a report which concluded that hydraulic fracturing had not caused a measurable impact on drinking water sources in the U.S. This and similar conclusions from similar investigations carry positive implications for our industry. In spite of these favorable empirical data, the current administration imposed a temporary suspension of new oil and gas leasing permits on federal oil and gas drilling areas. This suspension has been challenged in court and was blocked in the fourth quarter of 2021. Early in 2022 a final decision was still pending. This legislation has had a minimal impact on RPC’s Technical Services Segment’s revenues. Furthermore, we do not believe that this ban, or any similar future ban, would impact RPC’s Technical Services Segment’s revenues because this or similar bans would only apply to drilling and completion on Federal lands, which account for less than 10 percent of U.S. oilfield activity.

General Risks.

Our common stock price has been volatile.

Historically, the market price of common stock of companies engaged in the oil and gas services industry has been highly volatile. Likewise, the market price of our common stock has varied significantly in the past.

Risks Related to our Capital and Ownership Structure.

Our management has a substantial ownership interest, and public stockholders may have no effective voice in the management of the Company.

The Company has elected the “Controlled Corporation” exemption under Section 303A of the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) Listed Company Manual. The Company is a “Controlled Corporation” because a group that includes the Company’s Chairman of the Board, Gary W. Rollins, who is also a director of the Company, and certain companies under his control (the “Controlling Group”), controls in excess of fifty percent of the Company’s voting power. As a “Controlled Corporation,” the Company need not comply with certain NYSE rules including those requiring a majority of independent directors, and independent compensation and nominating committees.

RPC’s executive officers, directors and their affiliates hold directly or through indirect beneficial ownership, in the aggregate, 67 percent of RPC’s outstanding shares of common stock. As a result, these stockholders effectively control the operations of RPC, including the election of directors and approval of significant corporate transactions such as acquisitions and other matters requiring stockholder approval. This concentration of ownership could also have the effect of delaying or preventing a third party from acquiring control over the Company at a premium.

The Controlling Group could take actions that could negatively impact our results of operations, financial condition or stock price.

The Controlling Group may from time to time and at any time, in their sole discretion, acquire or cause to be acquired, additional equity or other instruments of the Company, its subsidiaries or affiliates, or derivative instruments the value of which is linked to Company securities, or dispose or cause to be disposed, such equity or other securities or instruments, in any amount that the Controlling Group may determine in their sole discretion, through open market transactions, privately negotiated transactions or otherwise. In addition, depending upon a variety of factors, the Controlling Group may at any time engage in discussions with the

13

Company and its affiliates, and other persons, including retained outside advisers, concerning the Company’s business, management, strategic alternatives and direction, and in their sole discretion, consider, formulate and implement various plans or proposals intended to enhance the value of their investment in the Company. In the event the Controlling Group were to engage in any of these actions, our common stock price could be negatively impacted, such actions could cause volatility in the market for our common stock or could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and our financial condition.

Our management has a substantial ownership interest, and the availability of the Company’s common stock to the investing public may be limited.

The availability of RPC’s common stock to the investing public may be limited to those shares not held by the executive officers, directors and their affiliates, which could negatively impact RPC’s stock trading prices and affect the ability of minority stockholders to sell their shares. Future sales by executive officers, directors and their affiliates of all or a portion of their shares could also negatively affect the trading price of our common stock.

Provisions in RPC's certificate of incorporation and bylaws may inhibit a takeover of RPC.

RPC’s certificate of incorporation, bylaws and other documents contain provisions including advance notice requirements for stockholder proposals and director nominations, and staggered terms for the Board of Directors. These provisions may make a tender offer, change in control or takeover attempt that is opposed by RPC’s Board of Directors more difficult or expensive.

Risks Related to Digital operations, Cybersecurity and Business Disruption.

Our operations rely on digital systems and processes that are subject to cyber-attacks or other threats that could have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated results of operations and consolidated financial condition.

Our operations are dependent on digital technologies and services. We use these technologies and services for internal purposes, including data storage, processing and transmissions, as well as in our interactions with customers and suppliers. Digital technologies are subject to the risk of cyber-attacks, both from internal and external threats. Internal threats in cybersecurity are caused by the misuse of access to networks and assets by individuals within the Company by maliciously or negligently disclosing, modifying or deleting sensitive information. Individuals within the Company include current employees, contractors and partners. External threats in cybersecurity are caused by unauthorized parties attempting to gain access to our networks and assets by exploiting security vulnerabilities or through the introduction of malicious code, such as viruses, worms, Trojan horses and ransomware. In response to the risk of cyber-attacks, we regularly review and update processes to prevent unauthorized access to our networks and assets and misuse of data. We provide regular security awareness training for all employees, simulate phishing assessments and closely manage the accounts and privileges of all employees and contractors. We also maintain an up-to-date incident response plan to quickly address cybersecurity incidents. We have experienced cyberattacks, including phishing and other attempts to gain unauthorized access to our network. To date, these attacks have not had a material impact on our operations.

If our systems for protecting against cybersecurity risks prove to be insufficient, we could be adversely affected by, among other things, loss of or damage to intellectual property, proprietary or confidential information, or customer, supplier, or employee data, as well as, interruption of our business operations and increased costs required to prevent, respond to, or mitigate cybersecurity attacks. These risks could harm our reputation and our relationships with customers, suppliers, employees and other third parties, and may result in claims against us. These risks could have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated results of operations and consolidated financial condition.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

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Item 2. Properties

RPC owns or leases approximately 65 offices and operating facilities. The Company leases approximately 21,200 square feet of office space in Atlanta, Georgia that serves as its headquarters, a portion of which is allocated and charged to Marine Products Corporation. See “Related Party Transactions” contained in Item 7. As of December 31, 2021, the lease agreement on the headquarters is effective through May 2031. RPC believes its current operating facilities are suitable and adequate to meet current and reasonably anticipated future needs. Descriptions of the major facilities used in our operations are as follows:

Owned Locations

Broussard, Louisiana — Operations, sales and equipment storage yard

Elk City, Oklahoma — Operations, sales and equipment storage yard

Houma, Louisiana — Administrative office

Channelview, Texas — Pipe storage yard and inspection services

Odessa, Texas — Pumping services facility

Rock Springs, Wyoming — Operations, sales and equipment storage yard

Vernal, Utah — Operations, sales and equipment storage yards

Newcastle, Oklahoma — Operations, sales and administrative offices

Leased Locations

Midland, Texas — Operations, sales and administrative offices

Seminole, Oklahoma — Pumping services facility

The Woodlands, Texas — Operations, sales and administrative office

Odessa, Texas — Pumping services facility

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

RPC is a party to various routine legal proceedings primarily involving commercial claims, workers’ compensation claims and claims for personal injury. RPC insures against these risks to the extent deemed prudent by its management, but no assurance can be given that the nature and amount of such insurance will, in every case, fully indemnify RPC against liabilities arising out of pending and future legal proceedings related to its business activities. While the outcome of these lawsuits, legal proceedings and claims cannot be predicted with certainty, management believes that the outcome of all such proceedings, even if determined adversely, would not have a material adverse effect on RPC’s business or financial condition.

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

The information required by Section 1503(a) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and Item 104 of Regulation S-K is included in Exhibit 95.1 to this Form 10-K.

Item 4A. Information About Our Executive Officers

In April of 2021, the Executive Officers of the Company were elected by the Board of Directors to serve at least one year, or until the April 2022 Board of Directors’ meeting, or until their earlier removal by the Board of Directors or their resignation. The following table lists the executive officers of RPC and their ages, offices, and terms of office with RPC.

Name and Office with Registrant

    

Age

    

Date First Elected to Present Office

Richard A. Hubbell (1)

 

77

 

4/22/03

President and Chief Executive Officer

Ben M. Palmer (2)

 

61

 

7/8/96

Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Secretary

(1)Richard A. Hubbell has been the President of RPC since 1987 and Chief Executive Officer since 2003. He has also been the President and Chief Executive Officer of Marine Products Corporation since it was spun off from RPC in 2001. Mr. Hubbell serves on the Board of Directors of both of these companies.

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(2)Ben M. Palmer has been the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of RPC since 1996. He has also been the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Marine Products Corporation since it was spun off from RPC in 2001. He assumed the responsibilities as Corporate Secretary of RPC and Marine Products Corporation in July 2017.

PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

RPC’s common stock is listed for trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol RES. As of February 18, 2022 there were 216,586,626 shares of common stock outstanding and approximately 10,700 beneficial holders of our common stock.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Shares repurchased by the Company and affiliated purchases in the fourth quarter of 2021 are outlined below.

    

    

    

Total Number

    

Maximum

of Shares (or

Number (or

 

 

 

Units)

 

Approximate

Purchased as

Dollar Value) of 

Part of

Shares (or Units)

 

Total Number of 

 

Average Price 

 

Publicly 

 

that May Yet Be 

 

Shares 

Paid Per

 

Announced

 

Purchased Under

(or Units)

Share

 

Plans or

 

the Plans or

Period

Purchased

(or Unit)

 

Programs (1)

 

Programs (1)

October 1, 2021 to October 31, 2021

 

$

 

 

8,248,184

November 1, 2021 to November 30, 2021

 

 

 

 

8,248,184

December 1, 2021 to December 31, 2021

 

 

 

 

8,248,184

Totals

 

$

 

 

8,248,184

(1)The Company has a stock buyback program initially adopted in 1998 and subsequently amended in 2013 and 2019 that authorizes the repurchase of up to 41,578,125 shares. On February 12, 2018, the Board of Directors increased the number of shares authorized for repurchase by 10,000,000 shares. There were no shares repurchased as part of this program during the fourth quarter of 2021. As of December 31, 2021, there are 8,248,184 shares available to be repurchased under the current authorization. Currently the program does not have a predetermined expiration date.

Performance Graph

The following graph shows a five-year comparison of the cumulative total stockholder return based on the performance of the stock of the Company, assuming dividend reinvestment, as compared with both a broad equity market index and an industry or peer group index. The indices included in the following graph are the Russell 2000 Index (“Russell 2000”), the Philadelphia Stock Exchange’s Oil Service Index (“OSX”), and a peer group which includes companies that are considered peers of the Company (the “Peer Group”). The Company has voluntarily chosen to provide both an industry and a peer group index.

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The Company was a component of the Russell 2000 during 2021. The Russell 2000 is a stock index measuring the performance of the small-cap segment of the US equity universe. The components of the index had a weighted average market capitalization in 2021 of $3.0 billion, and a median market capitalization of $1.3 billion. The Russell 2000 was chosen because it represents companies with comparable market capitalizations to the Company, and because the Company is a component of the index. The OSX is a stock index of 15 companies that provide oil drilling and production services, oilfield equipment, support services and geophysical/reservoir services. The Company is not a component of the OSX, but this index was chosen because it represents a large group of companies that provide the same or similar equipment and services as the Company. The companies included in the Peer Group are Weatherford International plc, Oil States International, Inc., Patterson-UTI Energy, Inc., and Halliburton Company. The companies included in the Peer Group have been weighted according to each respective issuer's stock market capitalization at the beginning of each year. The peer group used in the immediately preceding fiscal year (“the Former Peer Group”) included Weatherford International, Inc., Superior Energy Services, Inc., Patterson-UTI Energy, Inc., and Halliburton Company. Superior Energy Services, Inc., was included in the Former Peer Group but not the Peer Group because its common stock no longer trades on a recognized exchange. The Company included Oil States International, Inc. in the Peer Group because it engages in similar oilfield businesses.

Graphic

Item 6. Reserved

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Overview

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with “Selected Financial Data” and the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this document. See also “Forward-Looking Statements” on page 2. Discussions of year-to-year comparisons of 2020 and 2019 items that are not included in this Form 10-K can be found in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Part II, Item 7 on our Annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020, which Item is incorporated herein by reference.

RPC, Inc. (“RPC”) provides a broad range of specialized oilfield services primarily to independent and major oilfield companies engaged in exploration, production and development of oil and gas properties throughout the United States, including the southwest, mid-continent, Gulf of Mexico and Appalachian regions, and in selected international markets. The Company’s revenues and profits are generated by providing equipment and services to customers who operate oil and gas properties and invest capital to drill new wells and enhance production or perform maintenance on existing wells.

Our key business and financial strategies are:

-To focus our management resources on and invest our capital in equipment and geographic markets that we believe will earn high returns on capital.
-To maintain a flexible cost structure that can respond quickly to volatile industry conditions and business activity levels.
-To maintain capital strength sufficient to allow us to remain a going concern and maintain our operational strength during protracted industry downturns.
-To maintain an efficient, low-cost capital structure which includes an appropriate use of debt financing.
-To optimize asset utilization with the goal of increasing revenues and generating leverage of direct and overhead costs, balanced against increasingly high maintenance requirements and low financial returns experienced during times of low customer pricing for our services.
-To deliver product and services to our customers safely.
-To secure adequate sources of supplies of raw materials used in our operations.
-To maintain and selectively increase market share.
-To maximize stockholder return by optimizing the balance between cash invested in the Company's productive assets, the payment of dividends to stockholders, and the repurchase of our common stock on the open market.
-To align the interests of our management and stockholders.

In assessing the outcomes of these strategies and RPC’s financial condition and operating performance, management generally reviews periodic forecast data, monthly actual results, and other similar information. We also consider trends related to certain key financial data, including revenues, utilization of our equipment and personnel, maintenance and repair expenses, pricing for our services and equipment, profit margins, selling, general and administrative expenses, cash flows and the return on our invested capital. Additionally, we compare our trends to those of our peers. We continuously monitor factors that impact current and expected customer activity levels, such as the price of oil and natural gas, changes in pricing for our services and equipment and utilization of our equipment and personnel. Our financial results are affected by geopolitical factors such as political instability in the petroleum-producing regions of the world, overall economic conditions and weather in the United States, the prices of oil and natural gas, and our customers’ drilling and production activities.

The oil and gas industry experienced an unprecedented disruption during 2020 due to the substantial decline in global oil demand caused partly by the COVID-19 pandemic. Although global demand began to rebound in 2021, the pandemic could continue to impact the economic conditions in the United States, as federal, state and local governments react to the public health crisis, creating uncertainties in the United States, as well as the global economy. RPC instituted strict procedures to assess employee health and

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safety in its facilities and operational locations and attempted to hire redundant crews in order to continue to provide services to its customers.

Current industry conditions are characterized by oil prices which have risen from less than $20 per barrel in the second quarter of 2020 to approximately $86 per barrel early in the first quarter of 2022, the highest recorded oil price since the fourth quarter of 2014. While there are many factors influencing the price of oil, we note that the global oil market was oversupplied by approximately six percent during the second and third quarters of 2020 but was undersupplied by approximately two percent during the third and fourth quarters of 2020 and throughout 2021. We believe that the imbalance in global supply and demand have been an important catalyst for the significant increase in the price of oil since the cyclical low during the second quarter of 2020. In response to this significant increase in the price of oil, the U.S. domestic rig count has risen from a low of 244 in the third quarter of 2020 to 610 early in the first quarter of 2022. In addition, well completions have increased from 1,110 in the third quarter of 2020 to 2,578 in the fourth quarter of 2021.

RPC believes that oil production in the United States has also become an increasingly important determinant of global oil prices, because the United States has grown to be the world’s largest producer of oil and is more flexible in its ability to increase or decrease drilling and production activities more rapidly than the state-owned oil companies which comprise OPEC membership. During the past several years, improving drilling and completion activity have caused U.S. domestic oil production to continue to rise to a record production level in December 2019. Oil production fell during 2020 during the downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, but by the end of 2021 had increased by approximately 17 percent compared to the lowest oil production recorded during the second quarter of 2020. Customer activities directed towards natural gas drilling and production have been weak for several years because of the high production of shale-directed natural gas wells, the high amount of natural gas production associated with oil-directed shale wells in the U.S. domestic market, and relatively constant consumption of natural gas in the United States. One of these factors has been mitigated by the decline in oil-directed drilling. As a result, the price of natural gas has recovered from a low of $1.63 per Mcf during the second quarter of 2020 to $4.30 per Mcf early in the first quarter of 2022. The price increases in natural gas during the 2021 and early 2022 are encouraging, and RPC believes that they have encouraged our customers to increase drilling and completion activities.

The Company’s strategy of utilizing equipment in unconventional basins continued. During 2021, we made capital expenditures, excluding the equipment acquired under a finance lease, totaling $67.6 million, an increase of $2.6 million compared to the prior year. Capital expenditures during 2021 were primarily directed towards capitalized maintenance and selected growth opportunities.

Revenues during 2021 totaled $864.9 million, an increase of 44.6 percent compared to 2020. This increase was primarily due to higher customer activity levels during 2021 compared to the prior year which was negatively impacted by COVID-19 shutdowns. Cost of revenues increased $182.5 million in 2021 compared to the prior year primarily due to increases in expenses consistent with higher activity levels, such as materials and supplies expenses, employment costs and fuel costs. In addition, these costs increased due to higher market prices for materials and supplies, fuel and other raw materials. As a percentage of revenues, cost of revenues decreased to 76.7 percent in 2021 compared to 80.4 percent in 2020 due to the leverage of higher revenues over direct employment costs and improved pricing for RPC’s services.

Selling, general and administrative expenses as a percentage of revenues decreased to 14.3 percent in 2021 compared to 20.7 percent in 2020, primarily due to leverage of higher revenues over costs that are relatively fixed during the short term.

Income before income taxes was $16.4 million for 2021 compared to loss before income taxes of $309.4 million in 2020. Net income for 2021 was $7.2 million, or $0.03 earnings per share compared to net loss of $212.2 million, or $1.00 loss per share in 2020. The net loss in 2020 includes non cash charges of $211.0 million related primarily to asset impairments.

Cash flows from operating activities decreased to $47.7 million in 2021 compared to $78.0 million in 2020 primarily due to increased working capital requirements in 2021 compared to decreased working capital requirements in 2020. As of December 31, 2021, there were no outstanding borrowings under our credit facility.

Outlook

Drilling activity in the U.S. domestic oilfields, as measured by the rotary drilling rig count, reached a cyclical peak of 1,083 during the fourth quarter of 2018. Between the fourth quarter of 2018 and the third quarter of 2020, the drilling rig count fell by 77 percent. During the third quarter of 2020, the U.S. domestic drilling rig count reached the lowest level recorded up to that time. The principal catalyst for this steep rig count decline was the decrease in the price of oil in the world markets resulting from the decline in global oil demand associated with the COVID-19 pandemic which began in the first quarter of 2020.

RPC monitors rig count efficiencies and well completion trends because the majority of our services are directed toward well completions. Improvements in drilling rig efficiencies have increased the number of potential well completions for a given drilling rig

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count; therefore, the statistics regarding well completions are more meaningful indicators of the outlook for RPC’s activity levels and revenues. Annual well completions during 2018 increased by approximately 25 percent compared to 2017, and by approximately five percent in 2019 compared to 2018. Well completions in 2020 decreased by approximately 49 percent compared to 2019. However, well completions in 2021 increased by approximately 33 percent compared to 2020.

The current and projected prices of oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids are important catalysts for U.S. domestic drilling activity. Following the trough of the most recent oilfield downturn in the second quarter of 2020, the price of oil has risen by more than 215 percent early in the first quarter of 2022 compared to the average price of oil in the second quarter of 2020. The price of natural gas has risen by approximately 150 percent during the same time period, due to steady demand for natural gas and normal seasonal demand in the first quarter of 2022. Following a low price of $0.23 per gallon in the first quarter of 2020, the price of benchmark natural gas liquids has risen to $1.18 per gallon early in the first quarter of 2022. The price increases in these commodities during the past year are encouraging, and RPC believes that they have encouraged our customers to increase drilling and completion activities.

The majority of the U.S. domestic rig count remains directed towards oil. Early in the first quarter of 2022, approximately 82 percent of the U.S. domestic rig count was directed towards oil, an increase compared with approximately 77 percent during the same period in the prior year. We believe that oil-directed drilling will remain the majority of domestic drilling, and that natural gas-directed drilling will remain a low percentage of U.S. domestic drilling in the near term. However, we believe that natural gas-directed drilling has increased and will continue to increase in natural gas-directed basins in the United States due to the current and projected high prices of natural gas. This trend should be favorable for the demand for RPC’s services in these basins.

We continue to monitor the market for our services and the competitive environment, including the current trends and expectations with regard to environmental concerns and related impact on our fleets. The growing efficiency with which oilfield completion crews are providing services is a catalyst for the oversupplied nature of the oilfield services market. We believe that most of the feasible efficiency gains have been realized, and a number of our smaller competitors have ceased operations. These factors, combined with the increase in drilling and completion and the improvement in commodity prices, leads us to believe that the competitive market for our services will improve during the near term.

During the third quarter of 2021, RPC entered into an agreement for a new Tier IV dual-fuel pressure pumping fleet, which immediately went to work at the beginning of the fourth quarter. In 2019, RPC expanded its fleet of revenue-producing equipment, while also retiring older equipment which could no longer function effectively in service-intensive operating environments. We continue to selectively upgrade our existing equipment to operate using multiple fuel sources and to take advantage of advances in technology and data collection. We will continue to monitor current and expected customer activity levels and projected financial returns as we consider activating additional idle equipment during the near term. Our consistent response to the near-term potential of lower activity levels and competitive pricing has been to undertake moderate fleet expansions which we believe will allow us to maintain a strong balance sheet, while also positioning RPC for long-term growth and strong financial returns.

20

Results of Operations

    

2021

    

2020

    

2019

Consolidated revenues [in thousands]

$

864,929

$

598,302

$

1,222,409

Revenues by business segment [in thousands]:

 

 

 

Technical

$

815,046

$

556,488

$

1,145,554

Support

$

49,883

$

41,814

 

76,855

 

  

 

  

 

  

Consolidated operating income (loss) [in thousands]

$

16,291

$

(309,635)

$

(114,288)

Operating income (loss) by business segment [in thousands]:

 

 

 

Technical

$

24,434

$

(82,525)

$

(32,993)

Support

 

(2,725)

 

(6,714)

 

10,016

Corporate

 

(13,300)

 

(12,426)

 

(12,745)

Impairment and other charges (1)(2)

(217,493)

(82,273)

Gain on disposition of assets, net

$

10,882

$

9,523

$

3,707

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

$

7,217

$

(212,192)

$

(87,111)

Earnings (Loss) per share — diluted

$

0.03

$

(1.00)

$

(0.41)

Percentage cost of revenues to revenues

 

77

%  

 

80

%  

 

75

%  

Percentage selling, general & administrative expenses to revenues

 

14

%  

 

21

%  

 

14

%  

Percentage depreciation and amortization expense to revenues

 

8

%  

 

16

%  

 

14

%  

Effective income tax rate

 

56.1

%  

 

31.4

%  

 

23.0

%

Average U.S. domestic rig count

 

478

 

436

 

943

Average natural gas price (per thousand cubic feet (mcf))

$

3.92

$

2.03

$

2.57

Average oil price (per barrel)

$

68.13

$

39.50

$

56.90

(1)Amount in 2020 includes $212,292 related to technical services, $4,660 related to pension settlement loss and the remainder related to corporate expenses.
(2)Amount in 2019 includes $80,263 related to technical services and $2,010 related to corporate expenses.

Year Ended December 31, 2021 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2020

Revenues. Revenues in 2021 increased $266.6 million or 44.6 percent compared to 2020 primarily due to higher activity levels as 2020 was negatively impacted by COVID-19 shutdowns. The Technical Services segment revenues in 2021 increased $258.6 million or 46.5 percent compared to the prior year. The increase is due primarily to higher activity levels and higher pricing within most of our service lines as compared to the prior year. The Support Services segment revenues in 2021 increased $8.1 million or 19.3 percent compared to 2020 due primarily to higher activity levels in the rental tools service line, which is the largest service line within this segment. Technical Services reported operating income of $24.4 million during 2021 compared to an operating loss of $82.5 million in the prior year, while Support Services reported an operating loss of $5.7 million in 2021 compared to an operating loss of $6.7 million in the prior year. The average price of oil increased 72.5 percent and the average price of natural gas increased 93.0 percent during 2021 compared to the prior year. The average domestic rig count during 2021 was 9.5 percent higher than 2020. International revenues, which decreased from $35.9 million in 2020 to $31.2 million in 2021, were four percent of consolidated revenues in 2021 compared to six percent in 2020. International revenues decreased in 2021 primarily due to lower customer activity levels in Algeria, and Saudi Arabia, partially offset by higher activity in Canada compared to the prior year. Our international revenues are impacted by the timing of project initiation and their ultimate duration.

Cost of revenues. Cost of revenues in 2021 increased $182.5 million or 38.0 percent compared to 2020 primarily due to increases in expenses consistent with higher activity levels, such as materials and supplies expenses, employment costs and fuel costs. In addition, these costs increased due to higher market prices for materials and supplies, fuel and other raw materials. As a percentage of revenues, cost of revenues decreased to 76.7 percent in 2021 compared to 80.4 percent in 2020 due to the leverage of higher revenues over direct employment costs and improved pricing for RPC’s services.

Selling, general and administrative expenses. Selling, general and administrative expenses decreased slightly to $123.6 million in 2021 compared to $123.7 million in 2020. Selling, general and administrative expenses as a percentage of revenues decreased to 14.3 percent of revenues in 2021 compared to 20.7 percent of revenues in 2020 due to higher revenues over costs that are relatively fixed during the short term.

Depreciation and amortization. Depreciation and amortization were $72.7 million in 2021, a decrease of $22.8 million, compared to $95.5 million in 2020. Depreciation and amortization decreased significantly because of the asset impairment charges recorded during the first quarter of 2020.

21

Impairment and other charges. There were no impairment and other charges for the year ended December 31, 2021 compared to $217.5 million in 2020. Impairment and other charges in 2020 was comprised primarily of the total amount by which several of our asset groups’ carrying amounts exceeded their fair value, a non-cash pension settlement loss, costs to finalize the disposal of our former sand facility and employee severance costs.

Gain on disposition of assets, net. Gain on disposition of assets, net was $10.9 million in 2021 compared to $9.5 million in 2020. The gain on disposition of assets, net is generally comprised of gains or losses related to various property and equipment dispositions or sales to customers of lost or damaged rental equipment.

Other income (expense), net. Other income, net was $2.0 million in 2021 compared to other expense, net of $0.1 million in 2020.

Interest expense and interest income. Interest expense was $1.9 million in 2021 compared to $0.4 million in 2020. The increase in interest expense during 2021compared to the same period in the prior year is primarily due to interest expense related to the resolution of a long-term contractual dispute with a vendor and an indirect tax audit assessment. Interest expense in 2021 and 2020 also includes fees on the unused portion of the credit facility. Interest income decreased to $0.1 million in 2021 compared to $0.5 million in 2020 due to lower interest rates earned on cash balances.

Income tax provision (benefit).  Income tax provision was $9.2 million in 2021, compared to an income tax benefit of $97.2 million in 2020. The effective tax rate was 56.1 percent for 2021 compared to 31.4 percent for 2020. The effective tax rate in 2021 results from low income before income taxes coupled with unfavorable discrete tax adjustments.

Net income (loss) and diluted earnings (loss) per share. Net income was $7.2 million in 2021, or $0.03 diluted earnings per share, compared to net loss of $212.2 million in 2020, or $1.00 diluted loss per share. This improvement in earnings per share was due to higher profitability, partially due to impairment charges recorded in 2020, as average shares outstanding was essentially unchanged.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Cash and Cash Flows

The Company’s cash and cash equivalents were $82.4 million as of December 31, 2021, $84.5 million as of December 31, 2020 and $50.0 million as of December 31, 2019.

The following table sets forth the historical cash flows for the years ended December 31:

 

(in thousands)

    

2021

    

2020

    

2019

 

(In thousands)

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

$

47,719

$

77,958

$

209,141

Net cash used for investing activities

 

(47,631)

 

(42,659)

 

(235,788)

Net cash used for financing activities

 

(2,151)

 

(826)

 

(39,592)

Cash provided by operating activities for 2021 decreased by $30.2 million compared to the prior year. Cash provided by operating activities during 2021 resulted from net income of $7.2 million coupled with an unfavorable change in accounts receivable of $91.1 million, partially offset by favorable changes in other components of our working capital (accounts payable and taxes receivable) of $57.3 million. Working capital increased primarily due to higher activity levels, partially offset by receipts of income tax refunds related to net operating loss carrybacks.

Cash used for investing activities for 2021 increased by $4.0 million compared to 2021, primarily due to an increase in capital expenditures, partially offset by a decrease in proceeds from the sale of assets.

Cash used for financing activities for 2021 increased by $1.3 million primarily as a result of cash paid for a finance lease, partially offset by lower cost of repurchases of the Company’s shares for taxes related to the vesting of restricted shares. There were no dividends paid to common stockholders in 2021 or 2020.

Financial Condition and Liquidity

The Company’s financial condition as of December 31, 2021 remains strong. We believe the liquidity provided by our existing cash and cash equivalents and our overall strong capitalization will provide sufficient liquidity to meet our requirements for at least the

22

next twelve months. The Company’s decisions about the amount of cash to be used for investing and financing activities are influenced by our capital position, and the expected amount of cash to be provided by operations. RPC does not expect to need our revolving credit facility to meet these liquidity requirements in the near term.

The Company currently has a $100 million revolving credit facility that matures in October 2023, as recently amended. The facility contains customary terms and conditions, including restrictions on indebtedness, dividend payments, business combinations and other related items. On September 25, 2020, the Company further amended the revolving credit facility. Among other matters, the amendment (1) reduced the maximum amount available for borrowing from $125 million to $100 million, (2) decreased the minimum tangible net worth covenant level from not less than $600 million to not less than $400 million, and (3) increased the margin spreads and commitment fees payable by 37.5 and 5 basis points, respectively, at each pricing level of the applicable rate without any changes to the leverage ratios used to calculate such spreads. As of December 31, 2021, RPC had no outstanding borrowings under the revolving credit facility, and letters of credit outstanding relating to self-insurance programs and contract bids totaled $16.3 million; therefore, a total of $83.7 million of the facility was available. The Company was in compliance with the credit facility financial covenants as of December 31, 2021. For additional information with respect to RPC’s facility, see Note 9 of the consolidated financial statements.

Cash Requirements

Capital expenditures were $67.6 million in 2021, and we currently expect capital expenditures to be approximately $120 million in 2022, comprised primarily of capitalized maintenance for existing equipment and selected growth opportunities. During the third quarter of 2021, RPC made the strategic decision to add a Tier IV dual-fuel fleet. This fleet was put into service late in the third quarter and is reflected as a finance lease with a balloon payment at the end of 12 months. The actual amount of capital expenditures will depend primarily on equipment maintenance requirements, expansion opportunities, and equipment delivery schedules.

The Company has ongoing sales and use tax audits in various jurisdictions subject to varying interpretations of statutes. The Company has recorded the exposure from these audits to the extent issues are resolved or can be reasonably estimated. There are issues that could result in unfavorable outcomes that cannot be currently estimated. See Note 12 for additional information.

During the fourth quarter of 2021, the Company initiated actions to terminate the defined benefit pension plan and as such, the year-end pension obligation has been valued on a termination basis. Specifically, the actuaries utilized an approach based on their experience with other plan terminations that (i) estimated a take rate for lump sums; (ii) for those participants electing a lump-sum, calculated the amount using the November 2021 IRS segment rates and (iii) for those participants with annuities purchased, calculated the amount using estimated insurance settlement rates. The Company currently expects to make no cash contributions to the plan in 2022 and approximately $6.0 million in final cash contribution to the benefit plan in early 2023 as part of termination.

As of December 31, 2021, the Company’s stock buyback program authorizes the aggregate repurchase of up to 41,578,125 shares, including an additional 10,000,000 shares authorized for repurchase by the Board of Directors on February 12, 2018. No shares were purchased on the open market during the twelve months ended December 31, 2021, and 8,248,184 shares remain available to be repurchased under the current authorization. The Company may repurchase outstanding common shares periodically based on market conditions and our capital allocation strategies considering restrictions under our credit facility. The stock buyback program does not have a predetermined expiration date.

On July 22, 2019, the Board of Directors voted to suspend RPC’s dividend to common stockholders. The Company expects to resume cash dividends to common stockholders, subject to the earnings and financial condition of the Company and other relevant factors. The Company has no timetable for the resumption of dividends.

Contractual Obligations

The Company’s obligations and commitments that require future payments include our credit facility, certain non-cancelable leases, purchase obligations, amounts related to the usage of corporate aircraft and other long-term liabilities. See note 16 for details regarding RPC’s lease obligations.

Fair Value Measurements

The Company’s assets and liabilities measured at fair value are classified in the fair value hierarchy (Level 1, 2 or 3) based on the inputs used for valuation. Assets and liabilities that are traded on an exchange with a quoted price are classified as Level 1. Assets and liabilities that are valued using significant observable inputs in addition to quoted market prices are classified as Level 2. The Company currently has no assets or liabilities measured on a recurring basis that are valued using unobservable inputs and therefore no assets or liabilities measured on a recurring basis are classified as Level 3. For defined benefit plan and Supplemental Executive

23

Retirement Plan (“SERP”) investments measured at net asset value, the values are computed using inputs such as cost, discounted future cash flows, independent appraisals and market based comparable data or on net asset values calculated by the fund when not publicly available.

Inflation

The Company purchases its equipment and materials from suppliers who provide competitive prices, and employs skilled workers from competitive labor markets. If inflation in the general economy increases, the Company’s costs for equipment, materials and labor could increase as well. In addition, increases in activity in the domestic oilfield can cause upward wage pressures in the labor markets from which it hires employees, especially if employment in the general economy increases. Also, activity increases can cause increases in the costs of certain materials and key equipment components used to provide services to the Company’s customers. Beginning in 2018, prices for the raw material comprising the Company’s single largest purchase began to decline due to increased sources of supply of the material, particularly in geographic markets located close to the largest U.S. oil and gas basin. In addition, labor costs declined throughout 2020 due to the significant decline in oilfield activity. However, during the fourth quarter of 2020 and throughout 2021, the price of labor began to rise due to increasing oilfield activity and the departure of skilled labor from the domestic oilfield industry during 2020. Early in the first quarter of 2022, market prices of some raw materials have increased significantly. We have successfully passed some of these costs to customers, but due to the competitive nature of the oilfield services business, there is no assurance that we will continue to so in the future.

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

The Company does not have any material off balance sheet arrangements.

Related Party Transactions

See “NOTE 14: RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS” of the consolidated financial statements, which is incorporated herein by reference, for a description of related party transactions.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

The consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, which require significant judgment by management in selecting the appropriate assumptions for calculating accounting estimates. These judgments are based on our historical experience, terms of existing contracts, trends in the industry, and information available from other outside sources, as appropriate. Senior management has discussed the development, selection and disclosure of its critical accounting policies requiring significant judgements and estimates with the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors. The Company believes the following critical accounting policies involve estimates that require a higher degree of judgment and complexity:

Credit loss allowance for accounts receivable — Substantially all of the Company’s receivables are due from oil and gas exploration and production companies in the United States, selected international locations and foreign, nationally owned oil companies. Our credit loss allowance is determined using a combination of factors to ensure that our receivables are not overstated due to uncollectibility. Our established credit evaluation procedures seek to minimize the amount of business we conduct with higher risk customers. Our customers’ ability to pay is directly related to their ability to generate cash flow on their projects and is significantly affected by the volatility in the price of oil and natural gas. Credit loss allowance for accounts receivable are recorded in selling, general and administrative expenses. Accounts are written off against the allowance when the Company determines that amounts are uncollectible and recoveries of amounts previously written off are recorded when collected. Significant recoveries will generally reduce the required provision in the period of recovery, thereby causing credit loss allowance to fluctuate significantly from period to period. Recoveries were insignificant in 2021, 2020 and 2019. We record specific provisions when we become aware of a customer's inability to meet its financial obligations, such as in the case of bankruptcy filings or deterioration in the customer's operating results or financial position. If circumstances related to a customer changes, our estimate of the realizability of the receivable would be further adjusted, either upward or downward.

The estimated credit loss allowance is based on our evaluation of the overall trends in the oil and gas industry, financial condition of our customers, our historical write-off experience, current economic conditions, and in the case of international customers, our judgments about the economic and political environment of the related country and region. In addition to reserves established for specific customers, we establish general reserves by using different percentages depending on the age of the receivables which we adjust periodically based on management judgment and the economic strength of our customers. The net credit loss allowance as a percentage of revenues ranged from 0.03 percent to 0.8 percent over the last three years. Increasing or decreasing the estimated general reserve percentages by 0.50 percentage points as of December 31, 2021 would have resulted in a change of $4.3 million in the recorded provision for current expected credit losses.

24

Insurance expenses —The Company self-insures, up to certain policy-specified limits, certain risks related to general liability, workers’ compensation, vehicle and equipment liability. The cost of claims under these self-insurance programs is estimated and accrued using individual case-based valuations and statistical analysis and is based upon judgment and historical experience; however, the ultimate cost of many of these claims may not be known for several years. These claims are monitored and the cost estimates are revised as developments occur relating to such claims. The Company has retained an independent third party actuary to assist in the calculation of a range of exposure for these claims. As of December 31, 2021, the Company estimates the range of exposure to be from $19.4 million to $24.5 million. The Company has recorded liabilities at December 31, 2021 of $21.9 million which represents management’s best estimate of probable loss.

Long-lived assets including goodwill RPC carries a variety of long-lived assets on its balance sheet including property, plant and equipment and goodwill. Impairment is the condition that exists when the carrying amount of a long-lived asset exceeds its fair value. Goodwill is the excess of the cost of an acquired entity over the net of the amounts assigned to assets acquired and liabilities assumed. The Company conducts impairment tests on goodwill annually, during the fourth quarter, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate an impairment may exist. In addition, the Company conducts impairment tests on long-lived assets, other than goodwill, whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable.

For the impairment testing on long-lived assets, other than goodwill, a long-lived asset is grouped at the lowest level for which identifiable cash flows are largely independent of the cash flows of other assets and liabilities. Estimated future undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the asset group are compared to its carrying amount. If the undiscounted cash flows are less than the asset group’s carrying amount, then the Company is required to determine the asset group's fair value by using a discounted cash flow analysis. This analysis is based on estimates such as management’s short-term and long-term forecast of operating performance, including revenue growth rates and expected profitability margins, estimates of the remaining useful life and service potential of the assets within the asset group, and a discount rate based on weighted average cost of capital. An impairment loss is measured and recorded as the amount by which the asset group's carrying amount exceeds its fair value. Assessment of goodwill impairment is conducted at the level of each reporting unit, which is the same as our reportable segments, Technical Services and Support Services, comparing the estimated fair value of each reporting unit to the reporting unit’s carrying value, including goodwill. The fair value of each reporting unit is estimated using an income approach and a market approach. The income approach uses discounted cash flow analysis based on management’s short-term and long-term forecast of operating performance. This analysis includes significant assumptions regarding discount rates, revenue growth rates, expected profitability margins, forecasted capital expenditures and the timing of expected future cash flows based on market conditions. If the estimated fair value of a reporting unit exceeds its carrying amount, goodwill of the reporting unit is not considered impaired. If the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its estimated fair value, an impairment loss is measured and recorded.

During the year ended December 31, 2020, the Company recorded an asset impairment loss totaling $204.8 million related to its long-lived asset groups, in response to the drastic decline in oilfield drilling and completion activities that began in the first quarter of 2020. See Note 3 of the consolidated financial statements for additional information which is incorporated herein by reference.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

See Note 1 of the consolidated financial statements, which is incorporated herein by reference for a description of recent accounting standards, including the expected dates of adoption and estimated effects on results of operations and financial condition.

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

The Company is subject to interest rate risk exposure through borrowings on its revolving credit facility. As of December 31, 2021, there are no outstanding interest-bearing advances on our credit facility which bear interest at a floating rate.

Additionally, the Company is exposed to market risk resulting from changes in foreign exchange rates. However, since the majority of the Company’s transactions occur in U.S. currency, this risk is not expected to have a material effect on its consolidated results of operations or financial condition.

25

MANAGEMENT’S REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

To the Stockholders of RPC, Inc.:

The management of RPC, Inc. is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting for the Company. RPC, Inc. maintains a system of internal accounting controls designed to provide reasonable assurance, at a reasonable cost, that assets are safeguarded against loss or unauthorized use and that the financial records are adequate and can be relied upon to produce financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The internal control system is augmented by written policies and procedures, an internal audit program and the selection and training of qualified personnel. This system includes policies that require adherence to ethical business standards and compliance with all applicable laws and regulations.

There are inherent limitations to the effectiveness of any controls system. A controls system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the controls system are met. Also, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and any instances of fraud, if any, within the Company will be detected. Further, the design of a controls system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. The Company intends to continually improve and refine its internal controls.

Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operations of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2021 based on criteria established in the 2013 Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Based on this evaluation, management’s assessment is that RPC, Inc. maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2021.

The independent registered public accounting firm, Grant Thornton LLP, has audited the consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2021, and has also issued their report on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting, included in this report on page 27.

/s/ Richard A. Hubbell

/s/ Ben M. Palmer

Richard A. Hubbell
President and Chief Executive Officer

 

Ben M. Palmer
Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Corporate Secretary

Atlanta, Georgia

February 28, 2022

26

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

Board of Directors and Stockholders

RPC, Inc.

Opinion on internal control over financial reporting

We have audited the internal control over financial reporting of RPC, Inc. (a Delaware corporation) and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2021, based on criteria established in the 2013 Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”). In our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2021, based on criteria established in the 2013 Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by COSO.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”), the consolidated financial statements of the Company as of and for the year ended December 31, 2021, and our report dated February 28, 2022 expressed an unqualified opinion on those financial statements.

Basis for opinion

The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

Definition and limitations of internal control over financial reporting

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

/s/

GRANT THORNTON LLP

Atlanta, Georgia

February 28, 2022

27

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

Board of Directors and Stockholders

RPC, Inc.

Opinion on the financial statements

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of RPC, Inc. (a Delaware corporation) and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income (loss), stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2021, and the related notes and financial statement schedule included under Item 15(2) (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2021, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”), the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2021, based on criteria established in the 2013 Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”), and our report dated February 28, 2022 expressed an unqualified opinion.

Basis for opinion

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

Critical audit matters

Critical audit matters are matters arising from the current period audit of the financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. We determined that there are no critical audit matters.

/s/

GRANT THORNTON LLP

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2004.

Atlanta, Georgia

February 28, 2022

28

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

RPC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(in thousands except share information)

December 31,

    

2021

    

2020

ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents

$

82,433

$

84,496

Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $6,765 in 2021 and $4,815 in 2020

258,635

161,771

Inventories

 

78,983

 

82,918

Income taxes receivable

 

58,504

 

82,943

Prepaid expenses

 

9,773

 

9,124

Assets held for sale

692

4,032

Other current assets

 

2,990

 

3,075

Total current assets

 

492,010

 

428,359

Property, plant and equipment, less accumulated depreciation of $763,304 in 2021 and $790,712 in 2020

254,408

264,411

Operating lease right-of-use assets

24,572

27,270

Finance lease right-of-use assets

20,327

Goodwill

 

32,150

 

32,150

Other assets

 

40,898

 

38,315

Total assets

$

864,365

$

790,505

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

  

 

  

LIABILITIES

 

  

 

  

Accounts payable

$

74,404

$

41,080

Accrued payroll and related expenses

 

15,350

 

18,428

Accrued insurance expenses

 

10,129

 

5,489

Accrued state, local and other taxes

 

1,905

 

2,788

Income taxes payable

 

656

 

1,115

Current portion of operating lease liabilities

6,387

9,192

Current portion of finance lease liabilities

20,194

Other accrued expenses

 

1,824

 

1,473

Total current liabilities

 

130,849

 

79,565

Long-term accrued insurance expenses

 

11,770

 

11,822

Long-term pension liabilities

 

35,376

 

33,080

Deferred income taxes

 

17,749

 

13,332

Long-term operating lease liabilities

19,719

21,090

Other long-term liabilities

 

7,111

 

49

Total liabilities

 

222,574

 

158,938

Commitments and contingencies (Note 12)

 

 

  

STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

  

 

  

Preferred stock, $0.10 par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized, none issued

 

 

Common stock, $0.10 par value, 349,000,000 shares authorized, 215,628,716 and 214,951,093 shares issued and outstanding in 2021 and 2020, respectively

 

21,563

 

21,495

Capital in excess of par value

 

 

Retained earnings

 

640,936

 

627,778

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

(20,708)

 

(17,706)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

641,791

 

631,567

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

$

864,365

$

790,505

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these statements.

29

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

RPC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(in thousands except per share data)

Years ended December 31, 

    

2021

    

2020

    

2019

Revenues

$

864,929

$

598,302

$

1,222,409

COSTS AND EXPENSES:

  

  

  

Cost of revenues (exclusive of items shown below)

 

663,262

 

480,739

 

919,595

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

123,572

 

123,698

 

168,127

Impairment and other charges

217,493

82,273

Depreciation and amortization

 

72,686

 

95,530

 

170,409

Gain on disposition of assets, net

 

(10,882)

 

(9,523)

 

(3,707)

Operating income (loss)

 

16,291

 

(309,635)

 

(114,288)

Interest expense

 

(1,929)

 

(373)

 

(334)

Interest income

 

59

 

496

 

1,906

Other income (expense), net

 

2,027

 

81

 

(385)

Income (loss) before income taxes

 

16,448

 

(309,431)

 

(113,101)

Income tax provision (benefit)

 

9,231

 

(97,239)

 

(25,990)

Net income (loss)

$

7,217

$

(212,192)

$

(87,111)

Earnings (loss) per share

 

 

 

Basic

$

0.03

$

(1.00)

$

(0.41)

Diluted

$

0.03

$

(1.00)

$

(0.41)

Dividends paid per share

$

$

0.15

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these statements.

30

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

RPC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(in thousands except per share data)

Years ended December 31, 

    

2021

    

2020

    

2019

Net income (loss)

$

7,217

$

(212,192)

$

(87,111)

Other comprehensive income (loss):

  

  

  

Pension adjustment and reclassification adjustment, net of taxes

 

(2,890)

 

5,727

 

(5,030)

Foreign currency translation

 

(112)

 

(210)

 

553

Comprehensive income (loss)

$

4,215

$

(206,675)

$

(91,588)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these statements.

31

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

RPC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

(in thousands)

    

    

    

    

    

Accumulated

    

Capital in

Other

Common Stock

Excess of

Retained

Comprehensive

Shares

Amount

Par Value

Earnings

Income (Loss)

Total

Balance, December 31, 2018

214,544

$

21,454

$

$

947,711

$

(18,746)

$

950,419

Adoption of accounting standard (Note 1)

 

 

 

2,464

 

(2,732)

 

(268)

Stock issued for stock incentive plans, net

667

 

66

 

8,564

 

 

 

8,630

Stock purchased and retired

(788)

 

(77)

 

(8,564)

 

1,280

 

 

(7,361)

Net loss

 

 

 

 

(87,111)

 

 

(87,111)

Pension adjustment, net of taxes

 

 

 

 

 

(2,298)

 

(2,298)

Foreign currency translation

 

 

 

 

 

553

 

553

Dividends declared

 

 

 

 

(32,231)

 

 

(32,231)

Balance, December 31, 2019

 

214,423

 

21,443

 

 

832,113

 

(23,223)

 

830,333

Stock issued for stock incentive plans, net

 

716

 

71

 

8,664

 

 

 

8,735

Stock purchased and retired

 

(188)

 

(19)

 

(8,664)

 

7,857

 

 

(826)

Net loss

 

 

 

 

(212,192)

 

 

(212,192)

Pension adjustment, net of taxes

 

 

 

 

 

5,727

 

5,727

Foreign currency translation

 

 

 

 

 

(210)

 

(210)

Balance, December 31, 2020

 

214,951

21,495

627,778

(17,706)

631,567

Stock issued for stock incentive plans, net

 

819

 

82

 

6,494

 

 

 

6,576

Stock purchased and retired

 

(141)

 

(14)

 

(6,494)

 

5,941

 

 

(567)

Net income

 

 

 

 

7,217

 

 

7,217

Pension adjustment, net of taxes

 

 

 

 

 

(2,890)

 

(2,890)

Foreign currency translation

 

 

 

 

 

(112)

 

(112)

Balance, December 31, 2021

 

215,629

$

21,563

$

$

640,936

$

(20,708)

$

641,791

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these statements.

32

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

RPC, Inc. and Subsidiaries

(in thousands)

Years ended December 31, 

    

2021

    

2020

    

2019

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

  

  

  

Net income (loss)

$

7,217

$

(212,192)

$

(87,111)

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by operating activities:

 

  

 

  

 

  

Depreciation, amortization and other non-cash charges

 

72,506

 

95,309

 

172,607

Stock-based compensation expense

 

6,576

 

8,735

 

8,630

Gain on disposition of assets, net

 

(10,882)

 

(9,523)

 

(2,645)

Gain due to benefit plan financing arrangement

 

 

(891)

 

(126)

Deferred income tax provision (benefit)

 

4,888

 

(25,845)

 

(22,225)

Impairment and other non-cash charges

 

 

211,043

 

73,560

(Increase) decrease in assets:

 

 

 

  

Accounts receivable

 

(91,082)

 

80,769

 

81,094

Income taxes receivable

 

24,439

 

(58,798)

 

11,687

Inventories

 

3,951

 

18,076

 

20,962

Prepaid expenses

 

(650)

 

1,337

 

(692)

Other current assets

 

90

 

227

 

300

Other non-current assets

 

(1,170)

 

(3,819)

 

(3,024)

Increase (decrease) in liabilities:

 

 

 

  

Accounts payable

 

32,900

 

(9,130)

 

(42,241)

Income taxes payable

 

(459)

 

(419)

 

(3,172)

Accrued payroll and related expenses

 

(3,080)