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Harrington West Financial Group Incca (HWFGQ) SEC Filing 10-Q Quarterly report for the period ending Monday, June 30, 2008

Harrington West Financial Group Incca

CIK: 1063997 Ticker: HWFGQ

Exhibit 99.1

Harrington West Announces Financial Results for the June 2008 Quarter

SOLVANG, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Harrington West Financial Group, Inc. (Nasdaq:HWFG), the holding company for Los Padres Bank, FSB (LPB) and its division, Harrington Bank, today announced a $131 thousand loss or 2 cents per share on a diluted basis in the June 2008 quarter compared to $1.2 million or 21 cents per diluted share, respectively, in the June 2007 quarter. For the first six months of 2008, HWFG reported a loss of $3.4 million or 58 cents per diluted share compared to net income of $3.1 million or 54 cents per diluted share in the same period a year ago. The net loss for the first six months of 2008 was due to a net mark-to-market after-tax loss of $4.5 million on HWFG’s AAA-rated commercial mortgage backed securities (CMBS) total rate of return (TROR) swaps, CMBS securities, related hedges, and other securities, which occurred in the March 2008 quarter. These losses resulted as spreads on mortgage securities widened greatly and prices declined due to the extremely adverse liquidity and credit conditions. In the June 2008 quarter, the remaining CMBS related positions and hedges of borrowings for CMBS were fully disposed of at an after-tax gain of $1.3 million, as spreads partially recovered by early June.

Los Padres Bank remained well capitalized at June 30, 2008 by federal regulations. On April 23, 2008, HWFG completed its previously announced private placement of common stock, raising $4.3 million in proceeds by selling 550 thousand shares at $7.75 per share. $2.2 million of this offering closed as of March 31, 2008, and $2.1 million closed on April 23, 2008, after receiving regulatory approval for a rebuttal of control filing. Book value per share was $6.83 at June 30, 2008 compared to $6.96 at March 31, 2008. Book value reflects the net loss for the period plus the net changes in the mark-to-market values of HWFG’s available for sale securities portfolio and LIBOR-based cash flow hedges.

HWFG’s Board of Directors has temporarily suspended the regular quarterly common stock dividend to build capital levels. The Board will re-evaluate this decision quarterly, based on income trends and the success of its initiatives to increase capital ratios with an emphasis on limited dilution through selected asset reduction and margin expansion strategies.

Financial Performance Analysis

The net loss in the June 2008 quarter of $131 thousand was comprised of the following:

  • $1.1 million of core banking income after-tax (net interest income after provision for loan losses plus banking fee income less operating expense),
  • $1.3 million net after-tax gain on the disposition of all of HWFG’s CMBS, CMBS derivatives, and hedges of their related borrowings,
  • $653 thousand after-tax gain on both the sale of HWFG’s real estate investment in Hawaii and the sale of $16.0 million of single-family mortgage loans,
  • $1.6 million after-tax write-down of real estate owned, and
  • $1.5 million after-tax other-than-temporary impairment loss on securities available for sale.

The following information was filed by Harrington West Financial Group Incca (HWFGQ) on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 as an 8K 2.02 statement, which is an earnings press release pertaining to results of operations and financial condition. It may be helpful to assess the quality of management by comparing the information in the press release to the information in the accompanying 10-Q Quarterly Report statement of earnings and operation as management may choose to highlight particular information in the press release.
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SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
     
þ   QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2008
OR
     
o   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                      to                     
Commission File Number: 000-50066
HARRINGTON WEST FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
     
Delaware   48-1175170
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
610 Alamo Pintado Road
Solvang, California
(Address of principal executive offices)
93463
(Zip Code)
(805) 688-6644
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)
     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. þ Yes     o No
      Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
             
Large accelerated filer o    Accelerated filer o    Non-accelerated filer   o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company þ 
     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934).
o Yes     þ No
     Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date: 6,131,243 shares of Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share, outstanding as of July 31, 2008.
 
 

 


 

HARRINGTON WEST FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.
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 EXHIBIT 31.1
 EXHIBIT 31.2
 EXHIBIT 31.3
 EXHIBIT 32

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PART 1-FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1: Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
HARRINGTON WEST FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION (Unaudited)
(Dollars in thousands, except per share data)
                 
    June 30,   December 31,
    2008   2007
     
Assets:
               
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 18,636     $ 14,433  
Trading account assets
    967       2,307  
Securities, available-for-sale
    290,004       351,466  
Securities held to maturity (fair value of $53 at June 30, 2008 and $58 at December 31, 2007)
    51       56  
Loans receivable, net of allowance for loan losses of $6,847 at June 30, 2008 and $6,446 at December 31, 2007
    802,538       782,626  
Accrued interest receivable
    3,831       5,168  
Real estate owned
    4,135        
Premises, equipment and other long-term assets
    17,887       16,917  
Due from broker
    4       1  
Prepaid expenses and other assets
    2,786       2,848  
Investment in FHLB stock, at cost
    14,551       12,474  
Income taxes receivable
    3,073        
Cash surrender value of life insurance
    20,764       20,524  
Deferred tax asset
    16,374       8,384  
Goodwill
    5,496       5,496  
Other intangible assets
    578       702  
     
Total assets
  $ 1,201,675     $ 1,223,402  
     
 
               
Liabilities:
               
Deposits:
               
Interest-bearing deposits
  $ 855,900     $ 786,263  
Non-interest-bearing demand deposits
    43,813       50,070  
     
Total Deposits
    899,713       836,333  
FHLB advances
    192,000       247,000  
Securities sold under repurchase agreements
    34,351       49,981  
Subordinated debt
    25,774       25,774  
Accrued interest payable and other liabilities
    7,939       8,769  
Income taxes payable
          503  
     
Total liabilities
    1,159,777       1,168,360  
     
 
               
Shareholders’ equity
               
Preferred stock, $.01 par value; 1,200,000 shares authorized; none issued and outstanding
           
Common stock, $.01 par value; 10,800,000 shares authorized; 6,131,243 shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2008 and 5,554,003 shares issued and outstanding December 31, 2007
    61       56  
Additional paid-in capital
    39,091       34,424  
Retained earnings
    30,850       35,368  
Accumulated other comprehensive loss
    (28,104 )     (14,806 )
     
Total shareholders’ equity
    41,898       55,042  
     
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity
  $ 1,201,675     $ 1,223,402  
     
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

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HARRINGTON WEST FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME/LOSS (Unaudited)
(Dollars in thousands, except per share data)
                                 
    Three Months Ended     Six Months Ended  
    June 30,     June 30,  
    2008     2007     2008     2007  
         
Interest income:
                               
Loans
  $ 13,671     $ 15,080     $ 27,871     $ 30,073  
Securities
    4,786       4,234       10,151       8,560  
                 
Total interest income
    18,457       19,314       38,022       38,633  
                 
Interest expense:
                               
Deposits
    7,829       7,799       16,312       15,377  
Interest on FHLB advances, repos & other debt
    3,366       3,891       6,734       7,953  
                 
Total interest expense
    11,195       11,690       23,046       23,330  
                 
Net interest income
    7,262       7,624       14,976       15,303  
Provision for loan losses
    400       100       900       200  
                 
Net interest income after provision for loan losses
    6,862       7,524       14,076       15,103  
                 
Non-interest income:
                               
Gain (loss) on sale of available for sale securities
    (295 )     (1,004 )     1,107       (1,004 )
Income (loss) from trading assets
    6       1       (8,663 )     6  
Other-than-temporary loss
    (2,412 )           (2,482 )      
Gain on termination of cash flow hedge
    2,338             2,338        
Loss on write-down of real estate owned
    (2,603 )           (2,603 )      
Other income
    1,048             1,049        
Increase in cash surrender value of life insurance
    49       206       242       407  
Banking fee and other income
    886       924       1,726       1,797  
                 
Total non-interest income
    (983 )     127       (7,286 )     1,206  
                 
Non-interest expense:
                               
Salaries and employee benefits
    3,261       3,235       6,797       6,511  
Premises and equipment
    1,023       969       2,016       1,918  
Insurance premiums
    227       86       439       171  
Marketing
    143       117       239       231  
Computer services
    290       228       546       448  
Professional fees
    170       204       305       466  
Office expenses and supplies
    218       205       427       418  
Other
    752       703       1,425       1,281  
                 
Total non-interest expense
    6,084       5,747       12,194       11,444  
                 
Income (loss) before income taxes
    (205 )     1,904       (5,404 )     4,865  
Provision for income tax expense (benefit)
    (74 )     708       (2,027 )     1,813  
                 
Net income (loss)
  $ (131 )   $ 1,196     $ (3,377 )   $ 3,052  
                 
 
Basic earnings/(loss) per share
  $ (0.02 )   $ 0.22     $ (0.58 )   $ 0.55  
Diluted earnings/(loss) per share
  $ (0.02 )   $ 0.21     $ (0.58 )   $ 0.54  
Basic weighted-average shares outstanding
    6,131,243       5,546,653       5,860,739       5,531,530  
Diluted weighted-average shares outstanding
    6,131,243       5,653,321       5,860,739       5,643,337  
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

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HARRINGTON WEST FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS) (Unaudited)
(Dollars in thousands, except share and per share data)
                                                         
                                            Accumulated    
                    Additional                   Other   Total
    Common Stock   Paid-In   Retained   Comprehensive   Comprehensive   Stockholders’
    Shares   Amount   Capital   Earnings   Income/(Loss)   Income (Loss)   Equity
 
BALANCE, JANUARY 1, 2007
    5,460,393     $ 55     $ 33,332     $ 34,964             $ (653 )   $ 67,698  
Comprehensive income/(loss)
                                                       
 
                                                       
Net income
                            4,168       4,168               4,168  
 
                                                       
Other comprehensive loss, net of tax
                                                       
Unrealized losses on securities
                                    (10,757 )     (10,757 )     (10,757 )
Effective portion of change in fair value of cash flow hedges
                                    (3,396 )     (3,396 )     (3,396 )
 
                                                     
Total comprehensive loss
                                  $ (9,985 )                
 
                                                     
 
                                                       
Stock options exercised including tax benefit of $125
    93,610       1       719                               720  
Stock compensation expense
                    373                               373  
Dividends on Common Stk at $.675/Shr
                            (3,764 )                     (3,764 )
     
BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 2007
    5,554,003       56       34,424       35,368               (14,806 )     55,042  
     
 
                                                       
Comprehensive loss
                                                       
 
                                                       
Net loss
                            (3,377 )   $ (3,377 )             (3,377 )
 
                                                       
Other comprehensive loss, net of tax
                                                       
Unrealized losses on securities
                                    (13,409 )     (13,409 )     (13,409 )
Effective portion of change in fair value of cash flow hedges
                                    111       111       111  
 
                                                     
Total comprehensive loss
                                  $ (16,675 )                
 
                                                     
 
                                                       
Stock options exercised including tax benefit of $25
    27,240             233                               233  
Shares issued in private offering at $7.75
    550,000       5       4,257                               4,262  
Stock compensation expense
                    177                               177  
Dividends on Common Stk at $.195/Shr
                            (1,141 )                     (1,141 )
 
                                             
BALANCE, JUNE 30, 2008
    6,131,243     $ 61     $ 39,091     $ 30,850             $ (28,104 )   $ 41,898  
 
                                             
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

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HARRINGTON WEST FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (Unaudited)
(Dollars in thousands)
                 
    Six Months Ended
    June 30
    2008   2007
     
Cash flows from operating activities:
               
Net (loss) income
  $ (3,377 )   $ 3,052  
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by operating activities:
               
Accretion of deferred loan fees and costs
    (295 )     (228 )
Depreciation and amortization
    735       768  
Amortization of premiums and discounts on loans receivable and securities
    (467 )     720  
Deferred income taxes
    (7,990 )     (66 )
Provision for loan losses
    900       200  
Activity in trading account assets
    (1,311 )     (25 )
Loss (gain) on sale of trading securities
    2,651       (3 )
Loss (gain) on sale of available-for-sale securities
    (1,107 )     1,004  
Gain on termination of cash flow swaps
    (2,338 )      
Loss on other-than-temporary impairment
    2,482        
Loss on write-down of real estate owned
    2,603        
FHLB stock dividend
    (346 )     (391 )
Earnings on bank owned life insurance
    (242 )     (407 )
Decrease in accrued interest receivable
    1,337       71  
Increase in income tax receivable, net of payable
    (3,576 )     (649 )
Decrease in prepaid expenses and other assets
    9,634       1,059  
Stock compensation expense
    177       204  
Decrease in accounts payable, accrued expenses, and other liabilities
    (706 )     (829 )
     
Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities
    (1,236 )     4,480  
     
 
               
Cash flows from investing activities:
               
Net increase in loans receivable
    (43,432 )     (2,341 )
Proceeds from sale of loans
    16,133        
Proceeds from sales of securities available for sale
    171,925       35,999  
Purchases of securities available for sale
    (162,501 )     (77,433 )
Principal paydowns on securities available for sale
    29,671       62,681  
Principal paydowns on securities held to maturity
    5       7  
Proceeds from sale of real estate acquired through foreclosure
    53        
Net purchase of premises and equipment
    (1,888 )     (272 )
Proceeds from sale of fixed assets
    1,100        
Redemption (purchase) of FHLB Stock
    (1,731 )     1,799  
     
Net cash provided by investing activities
    9,335       20,440  
     
 
               
Cash flows from financing activities:
               
Net increase in deposits
    63,380       38,143  
Decrease in securities sold under agreements to repurchase
    (15,630 )     (14,984 )
Decrease in FHLB advances
    (55,000 )     (50,000 )
Proceeds from exercise of stock options, including tax benefits
    233       661  
Proceeds from shares issued in private offering
    4,262        
Dividends paid on common stock
    (1,141 )     (1,394 )
     
Net cash used in financing activities
    (3,896 )     (27,574 )
     
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
    4,203       (2,654 )
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
    14,433       21,178  
     
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
  $ 18,636     $ 18,524  
     
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

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HARRINGTON WEST FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)
1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
     Business of the Company - Harrington West Financial Group, Inc. (the “Company”) is a diversified, community-based financial institution holding company, incorporated on August 29, 1995 to acquire and hold all of the outstanding common stock of Los Padres Bank, FSB (the “Bank”), a federally chartered savings bank. We provide a broad menu of financial services to individuals and small to medium sized businesses and operate seventeen banking offices in three markets as follows: eleven Los Padres banking offices on the California Central Coast, three Los Padres banking offices in Scottsdale, Arizona, and three banking offices located in the Kansas City metropolitan area, which are operated as a division under the Harrington Bank brand name. The Company also owns Harrington Wealth Management Company, a trust and investment management company with $182.8 million in assets under management or custody, which offers services to individuals and small institutional clients through a customized asset allocation approach by investing predominantly in low fee, indexed mutual funds and exchange traded funds.
     Basis of Presentation - The consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America for interim financial information and general practices within the banking industry. In the opinion of the Company’s management, all adjustments consisting of normal recurring accruals necessary for a fair presentation of the financial condition and results of operation for the interim periods included herein have been made.
     The following is a summary of significant principles used in the preparation of the accompanying financial statements. In preparing the financial statements, management of the Company has made a number of estimates and assumptions relating to the reporting of assets and liabilities, including the allowance for loan losses, valuation of investment securities and derivatives, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities and the disclosure of income and expenses for the periods presented in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
     The unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements of the Company and subsidiaries presented herein should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements of the Company for the year ended December 31, 2007, included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K.
     Allowance for Loan Losses - Allowance for loan losses is increased by charges to income and decreased by charge-offs (net of recoveries). Charge-offs are recorded when management believes the uncollectability of the loan balance is confirmed.
     The allowance is maintained at a level believed by management to be sufficient to absorb estimated probable incurred credit losses. Management’s determination of the adequacy of the allowance is based on periodic evaluations of the credit portfolio and other relevant factors. This evaluation is inherently subjective, as it requires material estimates, including, among others, the amounts and timing of expected future cash flows on impaired loans, estimated losses on commercial loans, consumer loans and mortgages, and general amounts for historical loss experience, economic conditions, uncertainties in estimating losses and inherent risks in the various credit portfolios, all of which may be susceptible to significant change.

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\

     In determining the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses, the Company makes specific allocations to impaired loans in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) No. 114, Accounting by Creditors for Impairment of a Loan. Loans are identified as impaired when it is deemed probable that the borrower will be unable to meet the scheduled principal and interest payments under the terms of the loan agreement. Impairment is based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, except that as a practical expedient, a creditor may measure impairment based on a loan’s observable market price or the fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent.
     Allocations to non-homogenous loan pools are developed by loan type and risk factor and are based on historical loss trends and management’s judgment concerning those trends and other relevant factors. These factors may include, among others, trends in criticized assets, regional and national economic conditions, changes in lending policies and procedures, trends in local real estate values and changes in volumes and terms of the loan portfolio.
     Homogenous (consumer and residential mortgage) loan allocations are made at a total portfolio level based on historical loss experience adjusted for portfolio activity and economic conditions.
     Adoption of new accounting standards - In September 2006, the FASB issued Statement No. 157, Fair Value Measurements. This Statement defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. This Statement establishes a fair value hierarchy about the assumptions used to measure fair value and clarifies assumptions about risk and the effect of a restriction on the sale or use of an asset. The standard is effective for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2007. In February 2008, the FASB issued Staff Position (FSP) 157-2, Effective Date of FASB Statement No. 157. This FSP delays the effective date of FAS 157 for all non-financial assets and non-financial liabilities, except those that are recognized or disclosed at fair value on a recurring basis (at least annually) to fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2008, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The impact of adoption was not material.
     In February 2007, the FASB issued Statement No. 159, The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities. The standard provides companies with an option to report selected financial assets and liabilities at fair value and establishes presentation and disclosure requirements designed to facilitate comparisons between companies that choose different measurement attributes for similar types of assets and liabilities. The new standard is effective for the Company on January 1, 2008. The Company did not elect the fair value option for any financial assets or financial liabilities as of January 1, 2008.
     In March 2008, the FASB issued Statement No. 161, Disclosures about Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities — an amendment of FASB Statement No. 133. This Statement expands the disclosure requirements of FASB Statement No. 133 and requires the reporting entity to provide enhanced disclosures about the objectives and strategies for using derivative instruments, quantitative disclosures about fair values and amounts of gains and losses on derivative contracts, and credit-risk related contingent features in derivative agreements. The Statement is effective for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2008, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company plans to include the required disclosures in its first interim reporting period ending March 31, 2009.
     In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 141 (revised), “Business Combinations.” SFAS No. 141(R) changes the accounting for business combinations including the measurement of acquirer shares issued in consideration for a business combination, the recognition of contingent consideration, the accounting for pre-acquisition gain and loss contingencies, the recognition of capitalized in-process research and development, the accounting for acquisition-related restructuring cost accruals, the treatment of acquisition related transaction costs and the recognition of changes in the acquirer’s income tax valuation allowance. The Company is required to adopt SFAS No. 141(R) no later than January 1, 2009.

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The Company has not yet determined the impact SFAS No. 141(R) may have on its financial position, results of operations or cash flows
2. FAIR VALUE
     Statement 157 establishes a fair value hierarchy which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The standard describes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:
     Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets that the entity has the ability to access as of the measurement date.
     Level 2: Significant other observable inputs other than Level 1 prices such as, quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data.
     Level 3: Significant unobservable inputs that reflect a reporting entity’s own assumptions about the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing and asset or liability.
     The fair values of trading securities and securities available for sale are determined by obtaining matrix pricing, which is a mathematical technique widely used to in the industry to value debt securities without relying exclusively on quoted prices for the specific securities but rather by relying on the securities’ relationship to other benchmark quoted securities (Level 2 inputs). All of our securities are quoted using observable market information for similar assets which requires HWFG to report and use Level 2 pricing.
     Our derivative instruments consist of interest rate swaps, as such, significant fair value inputs can generally be verified by counterparties and do not typically involve significant management judgments (Level 2 inputs).
     Assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis are summarized below:
Fair Value Measurements at June 30, 2008 Using
                                 
            Quoted Prices in           Significant
            Active Markets for   Significant Other   Unobservable
            Identical Assets   Observable Inputs   Inputs
    Total   (Level 1)   (Level 2)   (Level 3)
Assets:
                               
Trading securities
  $ 967           $ 967        
Available for sale securities
  $ 290,004           $ 290,004        
Liabilities:
                               
Interest rate swaps
  $ 4,799           $ 4,799        

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     Assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis are summarized below:
Fair Value Measurements at June 30, 2008 Using
                                 
            Quoted Prices in           Significant
            Active Markets for   Significant Other   Unobservable
            Identical Assets   Observable Inputs   Inputs
    Total   (Level 1)   (Level 2)   (Level 3)
Assets:
                               
Impaired loans
  $ 7,113           $ 7,113        
     Loans - The Company does not record loans at fair value on a recurring basis. However, from time to time, a loan is considered impaired and an allowance for loan losses is established. Loans for which it is probable that payment of interest and principal will not be made in accordance with the contractual terms of the loan agreement are considered impaired. Once a loan is identified as individually impaired, management measures impairment in accordance with SFAS 114, “Accounting by Creditors for Impairment of a Loan”. The fair value of impaired loans is estimated primarily by using the value of the underlying collateral. Those impaired loans not requiring an allowance represent loans for which the fair value of the expected repayments or collateral exceed the recorded investments in such loans. At June 30, 2008, substantially all of the total impaired loans were evaluated based on the fair value of the collateral. In accordance with SFAS 157, impaired loans, where an allowance is established based on the fair value of collateral, require classification in the fair value hierarchy. When the fair value of the collateral is based on an observable market price or a current appraised value, the Company records the impaired loan as nonrecurring Level 2. When an appraised value is not available or management determines the fair value of the collateral is further impaired below the appraised value and there is no observable market price, the Company records the impaired loan as nonrecurring Level 3. Impaired loans had a carrying amount of $7.6 million, with a valuation allowance of $549 thousand.
3. EARNINGS (LOSS) PER SHARE
     The following tables represent the calculation of earnings per share (“EPS”) for the periods presented.
                                                 
    Three months ended June 30, 2008   Six months ended June 30, 2008
(net income/(loss) amounts   Income/(Loss)   Shares   Per-Share   Income/(Loss)   Shares   Per-Share
in thousands)   (Numerator)   (Denominator)   Amount   (Numerator)   (Denominator)   Amount
Basic EPS
  $ (131 )     6,131,243     $ (0.02 )   $ (3,377 )     5,860,739     $ (0.58 )
Effect of dilutive stock options
                                       
         
Diluted EPS
  $ (131 )     6,131,243     $ (0.02 )   $ (3,377 )     5,860,739     $ (0.58 )
         
                                                 
    Three months ended June 30, 2007   Six months ended June 30, 2007
    Income/(Loss)   Shares   Per-Share   Income/(Loss)   Shares   Per-Share
    (Numerator)   (Denominator)   Amount   (Numerator)   (Denominator)   Amount
Basic EPS
  $ 1,196       5,546,653     $ 0.22     $ 3,052       5,531,530     $ 0.55  
Effect of dilutive stock options
            106,668       (0.01 )             111,807       (0.01 )
         
Diluted EPS
  $ 1,196       5,653,321     $ 0.21     $ 3,052       5,643,337     $ 0.54  
         

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     Anti-dilutive options totaling 771,515 and 216,375 for year-to-date ended June 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively, are excluded from the calculation of earnings per share.
4. OTHER-THAN-TEMPORARY IMPAIRMENT
     As further discussed in Management’s Discussion and Analysis, management determined that seven available-for-sale securities with an amortized cost of $6.6 million were deemed other than temporarily impaired. As such, these securities were written down by $2.4 million to fair value through earnings in the June 2008 quarter.
5. TOTAL RATE OF RETURN SWAPS
     HWFG has invested in total rate of return (TROR) swaps having a diversified pool of high credit quality securities as the underlying index to provide diversification benefits and in an effort to profit from wide market spread. However, in the extremely adverse credit conditions of 2008, spreads on almost all non-agency mortgage securities widened precipitously and to all time wide levels on AAA commercial mortgage backed securities (CMBS). As a result, HWFG incurred a net after-tax mark to market loss of $4.5 million in the first quarter of 2008. In the June 2008 quarter, the remaining CMBS related positions and hedges of borrowings for CMBS were fully disposed of at an after-tax gain of $1.3 million, as spreads partially recovered by early June.
6. LOANS SOLD
     On April 30, 2008, management entered into an agreement with Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp to sell 94 loans or $16.7 million of lower spread earning fixed rate single family mortgage loans. Subsequent to the agreement, two loans paid off resulting in the sale of 92 loans at $16.0 million. The transaction settled May 15, 2008, with a $255 thousand pre-tax gain. A mortgage servicing right of $140 thousand was recorded on the sale date.
     Mortgage loans originated that were not originally intended for sale in the secondary market are accounted for at the lower of cost or fair value in accordance with FAS65, Accounting for Certain Mortgage Banking Activities.
Item 2: Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Corporate Profile
     Harrington West Financial Group, Inc. (NASDAQ: HWFG) is a diversified, community-based, financial institution holding company. Our primary business is delivering an array of financial products and services to commercial and retail consumers through our seventeen full-service banking offices in multiple markets. We also operate Harrington Wealth Management Company, our wholly owned subsidiary, which provides trust and investment management services to individuals and small institutional clients through customized investment allocations and a high service approach. The culture of our company emphasizes building long-term customer relationships through exemplary personalized service. Our corporate headquarters are in Solvang, California with executive offices in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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Mission and Philosophy
     Our mission is to increase shareholder value through the development of highly profitable, community-based banking operations that offer a broad range of high value loan alternatives, deposit products, and investment and trust services for commercial and retail customers in the markets of the California central coast and the metropolitan areas of Kansas City and Phoenix/Scottsdale.
Multiple Market Strategy
     Although our markets are geographically dispersed, we can compete effectively in each region due to our considerable market knowledge of each area, our placement of local management with extensive banking experience in the respective market, our strong community ties that enhance relationship development, the favorable demographic and economic characteristics specific to each market, and our broad product menu.
We believe this multiple market banking strategy provides the following benefits to our stockholders:
  1.   Diversification of the loan portfolio and economic and credit risk.
 
  2.   Options to capitalize on the most favorable growth markets.
 
  3.   The capability to deploy the Company’s diversified product mix and emphasize those products that are best suited for the market.
 
  4.   The ability to price products strategically among the markets in an attempt to maximize profitability.
     Based upon HWFG’s financial performance and economic conditions, we expect the opening of two to three banking offices every 18 months through new branching. We evaluate financial institution acquisition opportunities but are value oriented. Acquisitions are expected to be accretive to earnings per share within a 12-month period.
     Since 1997, we have grown from 4 banking offices to 17 banking offices. We have 11 full service banking offices on the Central Coast of California from Thousand Oaks to Atascadero along Highway 101, 3 banking offices in Johnson County, Kansas, in the fastest growing area of the Kansas City metro, and 3 offices in Scottsdale, Arizona. The Company also owns two parcels for future development in Gilbert, Arizona and Phoenix, Arizona in the Deer Valley Airpark. These banking centers are expected to be developed over the next 18 to 24 months depending on the Company’s performance and the length of the entitlement process.
Product Line Diversification
     We have broadened our product lines over the last 6 years to diversify our revenue sources and to become a full service community banking company. In 1999, we added Harrington Wealth Management Company, a federally registered trust and investment management company, to provide our customers a consultative and customized investment process for their trust and investment funds. In 2000, we added a full line of commercial banking and deposit products for small to medium sized businesses and expanded our consumer lending lines to provide Home Equity Lines of Credit. In 2001, we added internet banking and bill pay services to augment our in-branch services and consultation. In 2002, we further expanded our mortgage banking and brokerage activities in all of our markets. In 2004, we added the Overdraft Privilege Program and Uvest. Uvest expanded Harrington Wealth Management’s services to include brokerage and insurance products. During this past year, with emphasis on core deposit development, HWFG introduced the successful Power-Up account and Remote Deposit Capture.

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Modern Financial and Investment Management Skills
     We have expertise in investment and asset liability management. Our Chief Executive Officer spent thirteen years in this field consulting on risk management practices with banking institutions and advising on mortgage and related assets managed on a short duration basis. Our Chief Investment Officer, hired in February 2007, brought over twenty years experience in the investment and risk management fields.
     We invest in a short duration and high credit quality investment portfolio comprised largely of mortgage and related securities. Our goal is to produce a pre-tax return on these investments of 1.00% over the related funding cost. We believe our ability to price loans and investments on an option-adjusted spread basis and manage the interest rate risk of longer term, fixed rate loans, allow us to compete effectively against other institutions that do not engage in these activities.
Control Banking Risks
     We seek to control banking risks. Our disciplined credit evaluation and underwriting environment emphasizes the assessment of collateral support, cash flows, guarantor support, and stress testing. We manage operational risk through stringent policies, procedures, and controls and manage interest rate risk through our modern financial and hedging skills and the application of risk management tools.
Concentrate on Selected Performance Measures
     We evaluate our performance based upon the primary measures of return on average equity, which we are trying to maintain in the low to mid-teens, earnings per share growth, additional franchise value creation through the growth of deposits, loans and wealth management assets and risk management of credit, operations, interest rate risk and liquidity. We may forego some short term profits to invest in operating expenses for branch development in an effort to earn future profits. Given the current environment in 2008, evidenced by a very weak housing market, adverse credit conditions, and a soft economy, we have shifted our emphasis to heightened risk management, capital preservation, increasing liquidity, and producing stable earnings.
Profitability Drivers
     The factors that we expect to drive our profitability in the future are as follows:
  1.   Growing our low and non-costing consumer and commercial deposits and continuing to change the mix of deposits to fewer time based certificates of deposit. This strategy is expected to lower our deposit cost and increase our net interest margin over time. We have emphasized the development of low cost business accounts and our full-service, free checking and money market accounts for consumers.
 
  2.   Changing the mix of our loans to higher risk-adjusted spread earning categories such as business lending, commercial real estate lending, small tract construction and construction-to-permanent loan lending, and selected consumer lending activities such as home equity line of credit loans.
 
  3.   Diversifying and growing our banking fee income through existing and new fee income sources such as our overdraft protection program and other deposit fees, loan fee income from mortgage banking, prepayment penalty fees and other loan fees, Harrington Wealth Management trust and investment fees, and other retail banking fees.
 
  4.   Achieving a high level of performance on our investment portfolio by earning a pre-tax total return consisting of interest income plus net gains and losses on securities and related total return swaps over one month LIBOR of approximately 1.00% per annum. With our skills in

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      investment and risk management, we utilize excess equity capital by investing in a high credit quality, mortgage and related securities portfolio managed to a short duration of three to six months.
 
  5.   Controlling the interest rate risk of the institution and seeking high credit quality of the loan and investment portfolios. The Bank seeks to hedge the marked-to-market value of equity and net interest income to changes in interest rates by matching the effective duration of our assets to our liabilities using risk management tools and practices. The company maintains rigorous loan underwriting standards and credit risk management and review process.
     Together, we believe these factors will contribute to consistent and growing profitability. The effect of these factors on our financial results is discussed further in the following sections:
Results of Operations
     The Company reported a net loss of $131 thousand or 2 cents per share on a diluted basis in the June 2008 quarter compared to net income of $1.2 million or 21 cents per diluted share, respectively, in the June 2007 quarter. For the first six months of 2008, HWFG reported a loss of $3.4 million or 58 cents per diluted share compared to net income of $3.1 million or 54 cents per diluted share in the same period a year ago. The net loss for the first six months of 2008 was due to a net mark-to-market after-tax loss of $4.5 million on HWFG’s AAA-rated commercial mortgage backed securities (CMBS) total rate of return (TROR) swaps, CMBS securities, related hedges, and other securities, which occurred in the March 2008 quarter and a $1.5 million after-tax other-than-temporary loss on available for sale securities. These losses resulted as spreads on mortgage securities widened greatly and prices declined due to the extremely adverse liquidity and credit conditions. In the June 2008 quarter, the remaining CMBS related positions and hedges of borrowings for CMBS were fully disposed of at an after-tax gain of $1.3 million, as spreads partially recovered by early June.
     HWFG’s net interest income was $7.3 million in the June 2008 quarter versus $7.6 million in the June 2007 quarter and down from the $8.5 million in the December 2007 quarter. Net interest margin in the June 2008 quarter was 2.37% compared to 2.60% and 2.85% in the March 2008 and June 2007 quarter, respectively. The decline in net interest income and margin in the June 2008 quarter and for the first six months of 2008 can be attributed to the short-term lag between the re-pricing of HWFG’s Prime and LIBOR based loans and securities and the re-pricing of its certificate of deposit (CD) accounts. So far in 2008, Prime and LIBOR rates have declined by approximately 2.25% on approximately $550 million of loans and securities, while over $600 million of HWFG’s CD’s re-price throughout 2008. Furthermore, the rotation for part of the June 2008 quarter from off balance sheet AAA-rated CMBS TROR swaps to on balance sheet AAA-rated CMBS securities resulted in a temporary dilution of net interest margin from the addition of lower margin leverage. HWFG estimates that approximately half of the net interest margin decline in the June 2008 quarter of 23 bps results from the temporary leverage in AAA-rated CMBS securities (on balance sheet) rather than CMBS TROR swaps (off balance sheet), and the other half of the decline is related to the lag in re-pricing of floating rate loans and securities relative to CD’s. HWFG expects improvement in net interest margin in the latter half of 2008 as the full effect of the CD repricing is realized and a positive mix change results from the reduction of securities.
     The following tables set forth, for the periods presented, information regarding (i) the total dollar amount of interest income from interest-earning assets and the resultant average yields; (ii) the total dollar amount of interest expense on interest-bearing liabilities and the resultant average rate; (iii) net interest income before provision for loan losses; (iv) interest rate spread; and (v) net interest margin. Information is based on average daily balances during the periods presented.

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    Three Months Ended     Three Months Ended  
    June 30, 2008     June 30, 2007  
(In thousands)   Balance     Income     Rate (6)     Balance     Income     Rate (6)  
Interest earning assets:
                                               
Loans receivable (1)
  $ 805,870     $ 13,671       6.80 %   $ 760,855     $ 15,080       7.94 %
FHLB stock
    14,236       210       5.93 %     13,689       149       4.37 %
Securities and trading account assets (2)
    386,999       4,529       4.68 %     287,358       4,011       5.58 %
Cash and cash equivalents (3)
    20,221       47       0.93 %     12,353       74       2.40 %
 
                                       
Total interest earning assets
    1,227,326       18,457       6.02 %     1,074,255       19,314       7.20 %
 
                                       
Non-interest-earning assets
    37,208                       52,823                  
 
                                           
Total assets
  $ 1,264,534                     $ 1,127,078                  
 
                                           
 
                                               
Interest bearing liabilities:
                                               
Deposits:
                                               
NOW and money market accounts
  $ 164,232     $ 1,042       2.55 %   $ 100,540     $ 665       2.65 %
Passbook accounts and certificates of deposit
    686,836       6,787       3.97 %     589,713       7,134       4.85 %
 
                                       
Total deposits
    851,068       7,829       3.70 %     690,253       7,799       4.53 %
 
                                               
FHLB advances (4)
    245,013       2,710       4.45 %     233,363       2,946       5.06 %
Reverse repurchase agreements
    41,614       311       2.96 %     54,467       426       3.09 %
Other borrowings (5)
    25,774       345       5.30 %     25,774       519       7.97 %
 
                                       
Total interest-bearing liabilities
    1,163,469       11,195       3.85 %     1,003,857       11,690       4.65 %
 
                                           
Non-interest-bearing deposits
    43,961                       47,420                  
Non-interest-bearing liabilities
    11,601                       5,842                  
 
                                           
Total liabilities
    1,219,031                       1,057,119                  
Stockholders’ equity
    45,503                       69,959                  
 
                                           
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 1,264,534                     $ 1,127,078                  
 
                                           
Net interest-earning assets (liabilities)
  $ 63,857                     $ 70,398                  
 
                                           
 
                                               
Net interest income/interest rate spread
          $ 7,262       2.17 %           $ 7,624       2.55 %
 
                                       
Net interest margin
                    2.37 %                     2.85 %
 
                                           
Ratio of average interest-earning assets to average interest-bearing liabilities
                    105.49 %                     107.01 %
 
                                           
 
1)   Balance includes non-accrual loans. Income includes fees earned on loans originated and accretion of deferred loan fees.
 
2)   Consists of securities classified as available for sale, held to maturity and trading account assets. Excludes SFAS 115 adjustments to fair value, which are included in other non-interest earning assets.
 
3)   Consists of cash due from banks and federal funds sold.
 
4)   Interest on FHLB advances is net of hedging costs. Hedging costs include interest income and expense and ineffectiveness adjustments for cash flow hedges. The Company uses pay-fixed, receive floating LIBOR swaps to hedge the short term repricing characteristics of the floating FHLB advances.
 
5)   Consists of other subordinated debt.
 
6)   Annualized.

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    Six Months Ended     Six Months Ended  
    June 30, 2008     June 30, 2007  
(In thousands)   Balance     Income     Rate (6)     Balance     Income     Rate (6)  
Interest earning assets:
                                               
Loans receivable (1)
  $ 797,473     $ 27,871       7.00 %   $ 760,559     $ 30,073       7.93 %
FHLB stock
    13,356       375       5.65 %     14,166       367       5.22 %
Securities and trading account assets (2)
    377,308       9,654       5.12 %     295,095       8,043       5.45 %
Cash and cash equivalents (3)
    18,991       122       1.29 %     12,222       150       2.47 %
 
                                       
Total interest earning assets
    1,207,128       38,022       6.31 %     1,082,042       38,633       7.16 %
 
                                         
Non-interest-earning assets
    38,601                       53,913                  
 
                                           
Total assets
  $ 1,245,729                     $ 1,135,955                  
 
                                           
 
                                               
Interest bearing liabilities:
                                               
Deposits:
                                               
NOW and money market accounts
  $ 145,089     $ 1,870       2.59 %   $ 102,259     $ 1,350       2.66 %
Passbook accounts and certificates of deposit
    686,328       14,442       4.23 %     584,238       14,027       4.84 %
 
                                       
Total deposits
    831,417       16,312       3.95 %     686,497       15,377       4.52 %
 
                                               
FHLB advances (4)
    239,935       5,257       4.41 %     238,674       6,005       5.07 %
Reverse repurchase agreements
    45,975       699       3.01 %     59,533       915       3.06 %
Other borrowings (5)
    25,774       778       5.97 %     25,774       1,033       7.97 %
 
                                       
Total interest-bearing liabilities
    1,143,101       23,046       4.04 %     1,010,478       23,330       4.63 %
 
                                         
Non-interest-bearing deposits
    44,706                       48,407                  
Non-interest-bearing liabilities
    11,968                       7,647                  
 
                                           
Total liabilities
    1,199,775                       1,066,532                  
Stockholders’ equity
    45,954                       69,423                  
 
                                           
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 1,245,729                     $ 1,135,955                  
 
                                           
Net interest-earning assets (liabilities)
  $ 64,027                     $ 71,564                  
 
                                           
 
                                               
Net interest income/interest rate spread
          $ 14,976       2.27 %           $ 15,303       2.53 %
 
                                       
Net interest margin
                    2.48 %                     2.84 %
 
                                           
Ratio of average interest-earning assets to average interest-bearing liabilities
                    105.60 %                     107.08 %
 
                                           
 
1)   Balance includes non-accrual loans. Income includes fees earned on loans originated and accretion of deferred loan fees.
 
2)   Consists of securities classified as available for sale, held to maturity and trading account assets. Excludes SFAS 115 adjustments to fair value, which are included in other non-interest earning assets.
 
3)   Consists of cash due from banks and federal funds sold.
 
4)   Interest on FHLB advances is net of hedging costs. Hedging costs include interest income and expense and ineffectiveness adjustments for cash flow hedges. The Company uses pay-fixed, receive floating LIBOR swaps to hedge the short term repricing characteristics of the floating FHLB advances.
 
5)   Consists of other subordinated debt.
 
6)   Annualized.

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     The Company reported interest income of $18.5 million for the three months ended June 30, 2008, compared to $19.3 million for the three months ended June 30, 2007, a decrease of $857 thousand or 4.4%. The Company reported interest income of $38.0 million for the six months ended June 30, 2008, compared to $38.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2007, a decrease of $610 thousand or 1.6%. The decrease during the periods was due primarily to a declining yield on the loan portfolio, which was a reflection of declining market rates.
     The Company reported total interest expense of $11.2 million for the three months ended June 30, 2008, compared to $11.7 million for the three months ended June 30, 2007, a decrease of $495 thousand or 4.2%. For the six months ended June 30, 2008, the Company reported total interest expense of $23.0 million, compared to $23.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2007, a decrease of $284 thousand or 1.2%. The decrease in interest expense during the period was attributable to a reduced cost of funds on FHLB advances and deposits.
     The following table sets forth the activity in our allowance for loan losses for the periods indicated.
                                 
    Three Months Ended     Six Months Ended  
    June 30     June 30  
    2008     2007     2008     2007  
    (Dollars in Thousands)     (Dollars in Thousands)  
Balance at beginning of period
  $ 6,945       6013     $ 6,446     $ 5,914  
 
Charge-offs:
                               
Real estate loans:
                               
Commercial
    (306 )           (306 )      
Consumer and other loans
    (217 )           (218 )     (1 )
 
                       
Total charge-offs
    (523 )           (524 )     (1 )
 
                       
 
                               
Recoveries
    25             25        
 
                       
Net charge-offs
    (498 )           (499 )     (1 )
 
                       
Provision for losses on loans
    400       100       900       200  
 
                       
Balance at end of period
  $ 6,847     $ 6,113     $ 6,847     $ 6,113  
 
                       
 
                               
Allowance for loan losses as a percent of total loans outstanding at the end of the period
    0.85 %     0.80 %     0.84 %     0.80 %
 
                               
Ratio of net charge-offs to average loans outstanding during the period
    0.06 %     0.00 %     0.06 %     0.00 %
     The provision reflects the reserves management believes are required based upon, among other things, the Company’s analysis of the composition, credit quality and shift to growth of its single-family real estate and construction loans and decrease in commercial and industrial and other segments of the loan portfolios. Our allowance for loan losses has four components: (i) an allocated allowance for specifically identified problem loans, (ii) a formula allowance for non-homogenous loans, (iii) a formula allowance for large groups of smaller balance homogenous loans and (iv) an unallocated allowance. Each of these components is determined based upon estimates that can and do change when the actual events occur. The formula allowance uses a model based on historical losses as an indicator of future losses and as a result could differ from the losses incurred in the future; however, since this history is updated with

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the most recent loss information, the differences that might otherwise occur may be mitigated. The specific allowance uses various techniques to arrive at an estimate of loss. Historical loss information, discounted cash flows, fair market value of collateral and secondary market information are all used to estimate those losses.
     In the June 2008 quarter, $400 thousand was added to the provision for loan losses for specific valuation allowances and for the general allowance based on the mix and growth in loans.
     During the June 2008 quarter, $6.7 million of HWFG’s non-accrual loans migrated to REO and were written down by $2.6 million to $4.1 million, leaving $6.9 million in non-accrual loans. Of this write-down, $2.5 million pertains to a group of single family rental properties (with a $4.9 million loan balance at foreclosure) in the Kansas City metro in low to moderate income areas that were neglected by the borrower. Subsequent to the foreclosure of the properties in the June 2008 quarter, management obtained updated appraisals that indicated a sever decline in the value of the properties as compared to the original appraisals on the properties. The deterioration of the market values for these rental properties combined with borrowers’ neglect, led to the $2.5 million write down, which was recognized as a loss on write-down of real estate owned in the condensed consolidated statement of income. Upon acquisition of the properties, HWFG has taken aggressive management action to refurbish selected properties and increase rental income for future sale of the properties.
     In the June quarter, $17.0 million of mortgage securities were downgraded by the rating agencies with these securities having at least one of three ratings below investment grade, raising the total of securities in this category to $24.0 million. As a result of the downgrades, 7 securities with a book value of $6.6 million were determined to be other than temporarily impaired and written down by $2.4 million. (Refer to page 22 for a description of our processes for evaluating these ratings downgrades. HWFG continues to believe the market prices of its mortgage securities portfolio do not reflect the expected cash flow performance, and the mark-to-market loss reflected in equity of approximately $4.50 per share will recover to a material extent as spreads tighten and/or principal is returned at par. However, a further severe weakening of the real estate markets could alter this expectation, and therefore, no assurances can be given to the extent of any recoveries or further mark- to-market changes.
     Banking fee and other income was $935 thousand in the June 2008 quarter compared to $1.1 and $1.0 million in the June 2007 and March 2008 quarters, respectively. This decline in the June 2008 quarter was due to a lower crediting (interest) rate and total return (which has since rebounded in the September 2008 quarter) on its cash surrender value of life insurance investment, and lower mortgage brokerage fees in the weak mortgage banking environment. Deposit and Harrington Wealth Management fees continued to grow from the comparable quarters. A summary of banking fee and other income is illustrated in the following chart:

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    Banking Fee & Other Income  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
    June     June             June     June        
    2008     2007     %     2008     2007     %  
    Quarter     Quarter     Change     YTD     YTD     Change  
 
Banking Fee Type
                                               
Mortgage Brokerage Fee, Prepayment Penalties & Other Loan Fees
  $ 188     $ 270       (30.4 %)   $ 335     $ 510       (34.3 %)
Deposit, Other Retail Banking Fees & Other Fee Income
    442       413       7.0 %     882       809       9.0 %
 
                                               
Harrington Wealth Management Fees
    256       241       6.2 %     509       478       6.5 %
Increase in Cash Surrender Value of Life Insurance, net
    49       206       (76.2 %)     242       407       (40.5 %)
 
                                   
 
                                               
Total Banking Fee & Other Income
  $ 935     $ 1,130       (17.3 %)   $ 1,968     $ 2,204       (10.7 %)
 
                                       
     Operating expenses were controlled in the June 2008 quarter at $6.1 million compared to $5.7 million in the June 2007 quarter and $6.1 million in the March 2008 quarter. Operating expenses were virtually unchanged from the March 2008 quarter, as incentive and benefit compensation was reduced, and the deferral of loan costs increased with the nature and size of the loan production. These benefits were offset by the full staffing of the new Surprise, Arizona banking center and its related costs, as well as higher real estate owned (REO) expenses. For the first six months of 2008, operating expenses were $12.2 million compared to $11.4 million in the same period in 2007. The increase in expenses for the year-to-date period is attributed to increases in FDIC insurance expense as Los Padres Bank’s insurance premium credit was fully used, other insurance costs, start-up and operating costs for the Surprise banking center, and expenses to maintain and manage its REO.
Financial Condition
     HWFG continues to be affected by the dislocations in the credit markets, the weak real estate market, and the overall slowdown in the economy. Although its investment portfolio is of high credit quality, spreads on these largely mortgage investments have widened greatly due to the severe illiquidity and credit crisis in the markets, and as a result, the fair values have declined. HWFG performs independent analysis of the credit quality of the investment portfolio and its ability to earn all cash flows, and based on this analysis and the current state of the housing market, it expects to earn virtually all the related principal and interest from these investments. However, a further weakening of the housing market and general economy could affect this expected outcome adversely. Also, although HWFG has not experienced concentrated credit quality issues in its loan portfolio due to its diversification by market and loan type and underwriting standards, the weak real estate markets and economy have affected some borrowers and related credits, with deterioration of credit quality in some already classified credits.
Securities and Investment Activities
     The Company manages the securities portfolio in an effort to enhance net interest income and market value, as opportunities arise, and deploys excess capital in investments until such time as the company can reinvest into loans or other community banking assets that generate higher risk-adjusted returns.
     In the March 2008 quarter, investment returns were negatively affected, as AAA-rated CMBS spreads (Lehman AAA 8.5+ year index) widened markedly to the duration matched LIBOR benchmark by 157 bps, from 104 bps at December 31, 2007 to 261 bps at March 31, 2008. Over the five year period leading up to the credit crisis which began in the second half of 2007, this AAA-rated CMBS index spread averaged 33 bps, and ranged from a low of 22 bps to a high of 60 bps. $70 million of HWFG’s

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AAA-rated CMBS TROR swap positions expired by March 31, 2008 and were not renewed. The remaining $10 million notional amount expired at April 30, 2008 and was cross hedged until expiration. These positions were established to capitalize on a diversified portfolio of CMBS as spreads widened in the third quarter of 2007. As a result of the widening, HWFG incurred mark-to-market losses on these CMBS TROR positions and other CMBS related positions of $4.5 million after tax in the March 2008 quarter. In early April 2008, HWFG purchased about $50 million of AAA-rated CMBS in its available for sale (AFS) portfolio to earn the wide risk-adjusted spreads still available on these securities. By the end of the June 2008 quarter, the remaining CMBS related positions and hedges of borrowings for CMBS were fully disposed of at an after-tax gain of $1.3 million, as spreads partially recovered by early June. In the period from 2003 to 2006, HWFG had earned $3.7 million after-tax on such positions.
     The fair value of securities classified as available for sale decreased to $290.0 million at June 30, 2008, as compared to $351.5 million at December 31, 2007, a decrease of $61.5 million, or 17.5%, due to net sales, amortization, and market value declines. As of the quarter ended June 30, 2008, the Company’s available for sale portfolio had an unrealized market value loss of $25.2 million, which is reflected as a reduction in stockholders’ equity on an after-tax basis. As of June 30, 2008, based on the current state of the housing market HWFG expects to earn virtually all principal and interest on its investment securities; however, a more severe deterioration of the housing market could result in a material portion of the amount of the unrealized loss on investment securities at June 30, 2008, to be recognized in the income statement. If all cash flows are earned on the investments, the unrealized loss of $25.2 million on the AFS portfolio would be near zero with a substantial increase in shareholders’ equity and book value per share. For the six months ending June 30, 2008, HWFG recognized an after tax loss of $1.6 million in other-than-temporary impairment on available for sale securities.
     The amortized cost and market values of available for sale securities are as follows:
                 
    Amortized        
    Cost     Fair Value  
June 30, 2008
               
 
               
Mortgage-backed securities — pass throughs
  $ 55,478     $ 55,274  
Collateralized mortgage obligations
    92,918       81,875  
Asset-backed securities (underlying securities mortgages)
    180,150       151,334  
Asset-backed securities
    1,742       1,521  
 
           
 
               
 
  $ 330,288     $ 290,004  
 
           
                 
    Amortized        
    Cost     Fair Value  
December 31, 2007
               
 
               
Mortgage-backed securities — pass throughs
  $ 69,570     $ 69,101  
Collateralized mortgage obligations
    114,101       111,805  
Asset-backed securities (underlying securities mortgages)
    184,724       168,822  
Asset-backed securities
    1,900       1,738  
 
           
 
  $ 370,295     $ 351,466  
 
           
     Over the past several quarters, the rating agencies have revised downward their original ratings on thousands of mortgage securities which were issued during the 2005-2007 time period. As of June 30,

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2008, the Company held $13.8 million in fair value of investments that were originally rated “Investment Grade” but have been downgraded to “Below Investment Grade” rated by at least one of three recognized rating agencies. Of this group, $4.0 million was still rated investment grade by one rating agency. Furthermore, 81% of the fair value or 78% of the portfolio based on amortized cost, of the portfolio remained “AA” rated or higher by recognized rating agencies. As of June 30, 2008, the composition of the Company’s available for sale portfolios by credit rating was as follows:
                 
    Amortized        
    Cost     Fair Value  
June 30, 2008
               
 
               
Agency
  $ 55,478     $ 55,274  
AAA
    111,962       102,753  
AA
    90,622       77,473  
A
    28,382       24,961  
BBB
    19,713       15,407  
Below investment grade
    24,131       14,136  
 
           
 
               
 
  $ 330,288     $ 290,004  
 
           
                 
    Amortized        
    Cost     Fair Value  
December 31, 2007
               
 
               
Agency
  $ 69,570     $ 69,101  
AAA
    139,890       138,744  
AA
    115,084       106,090  
A
    41,621       34,691  
BBB
    170       170  
Below investment grade
    3,960       2,670  
 
           
 
  $ 370,295     $ 351,466  
 
           
     HWFG is not a program originator of sub-prime loans but does invest in investment grade sub-prime securities, largely rated AAA or AA by one or more rating agency, in a portion of its investment portfolio when the Company’s analysis indicates the spreads and return potential of these securities are high relative to the underlying risk. HWFG does not rely solely on the rating agencies’ analysis and ratings of sub-prime securities. Management performs its own independent analysis of the expected cash flows for more extreme delinquency, default, and estimates of losses incurred in the foreclosure and sale process to determine whether credit enhancement is sufficient for the spread to be earned relative to the risk of default. HWFG also reviews the nature of the issuers and their underwriting performance as well as the capabilities and performance of the servicers of the underlying loans and securities. HWFG has not invested in collateralized debt obligations (CDO’s) and does not anticipate doing so. As of June 30, 2008, the composition of the Company’s available for sale portfolio by type of security was as follows:

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    Amortized        
    Cost     Fair Value  
June 30, 2008
               
 
               
Agency
  $ 55,478     $ 55,274  
Prime
    84,062       75,860  
Alt-A
    7,342       6,102  
Subprime
    179,427       149,549  
Other
    3,979       3,219  
 
           
 
  $ 330,288     $ 290,004  
 
           
                 
    Amortized        
    Cost     Fair Value  
December 31, 2007
               
 
               
Agency
  $ 69,570     $ 69,101  
Prime
    104,195       103,202  
Alt-A
    9,217       8,475  
Subprime
    183,065       166,715  
Other
    4,248       3,973  
 
           
 
  $ 370,295     $ 351,466  
 
           
     HWFG monitors its investments on an on-going basis and, at least quarterly, performs analysis on certain of its investments in order to ascertain whether any decline in market value is other than temporary. In the quarter ended June 30, 2008, the results of this analysis indicated that a portion of the decline in market value of seven securities, with a book value of $6.6 million, was other than temporary, and, as a result, the affected securities were written down by $2.4 million.
Loans
     The Company’s primary focus with respect to its lending operations has historically been the direct origination of single-family and multi-family residential, commercial real estate, business, and consumer loans. As part of its strategic plan to diversify its loan portfolio, the Company, starting in 2000, has been increasing its emphasis on loans secured by commercial real estate, industrial loans and consumer loans.
     The Company recognizes that certain types of loans are inherently riskier than others. For instance, the commercial real estate loans that the Company makes are riskier than home mortgages because they are generally larger, often rely on income from small-business tenants, and historically have produced higher default rates on an industry wide basis. Likewise commercial loans are riskier than consumer and mortgage loans because they are generally larger and depend upon the success of often complex businesses. Furthermore construction loans and land acquisition and development loans present higher credit risk than do other real estate loans due to their speculative nature. Unsecured loans are also inherently riskier than collateralized loans. However, these loans also provide a higher risk-adjusted margin and diversification benefits to the loan portfolio.
     Net loan balances were $802.5 million at June 30, 2008, compared to $782.4 million and $759.4 million at March 31, 2008 and June 30, 2007, respectively. In the June 2008 quarter, HWFG sold $16.0 million of low spread earning single family mortgage loans for a $255 thousand gain. The loan portfolio, net of these sold loans, grew $20.1 million in the June 2008 quarter. HWFG has curtailed acquisition and

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development lending in the September 2008 quarter, given the current real estate environment, and has increased loan spreads, based on its credit analysis and the current level of market spreads
     The loan portfolio continues to be diversified among HWFG’s business lines as shown in the following chart:
                                                 
    HWFG Net Loan Growth and Mix  
    (Dollars in millions)  
    June 30, 2008     December 31, 2007     June 30, 2007  
            % of                             % of  
Loan Type   Total     Total     Total     % of Total     Total     Total  
Commercial Real Estate
  $ 269.6       33.2 %   $ 266.3       33.6 %   $ 249.7       32.6 %
Multi-family Real Estate
    90.3       11.1 %     82.7       10.4 %     81.6       10.6 %
Construction (1)
    139.6       17.2 %     126.5       16.0 %     126.1       16.4 %
Single-family Real Estate
    119.0       14.7 %     125.5       15.9 %     114.4       14.9 %
Commercial and Industrial Loans
    118.2       14.6 %     117.8       14.9 %     119.3       15.5 %
Unimproved Land
    45.5       5.6 %     45.3       5.7 %     49.4       6.4 %
Consumer Loans
    26.0       3.2 %     24.5       3.1 %     24.5       3.2 %
Other Loans (2)
    3.2       0.4 %     2.8       0.4 %     2.8       0.4 %
 
                                   
Total Gross Loans
    811.4       100.0 %     791.4       100.0 %     767.8       100.0 %
Allowance for loan loss
    (6.8 )             (6.4 )             (6.1 )        
Deferred fees
    (1.6 )             (1.9 )             (1.9 )        
Discounts/Premiums
    (0.5 )             (0.5 )             (0.4 )        
 
                                         
Net Loans Receivable
  $ 802.5             $ 782.6             $ 759.4          
 
                                         
 
(1)   Includes loans secured by residential, land and commercial properties. At June 30, 2008, we had $46.9 million of construction loans secured by single-family residential properties, $55.9 million secured by commercial properties, $36.7 million for land development and $79 thousand secured by multi-family residential properties.
 
(2)   Includes loans collateralized by deposits and consumer line of credit loans.
     The level and nature of classified loans remained relatively stable at June 30, 2008 compared to March 31, 2008. The total pool of classified loans has ranged from $7.0 to $16.0 million over the last several quarters, with $11.0 million in non-accrual loans and real-estate owned (REO) at June 30, 2008 compared to $12.0 million at March 31, 2008 and $3.3 million at December 31, 2007. During the June 2008 quarter, $6.7 million of HWFG’s non-accrual loans were transferred to REO and were written down by $2.6 million to $4.1 million, leaving $6.9 million in non-accrual loans. Of this write-down, $2.5 million pertains to a group of single family rental properties (with a $4.9 million loan balance at foreclosure) in the Kansas City metro in low to moderate income areas that were neglected by the borrower. Upon acquisition of the properties, HWFG has taken action to refurbish selected properties and increase rental income in order to maximize the price on future sale of the properties.
     Given the growth in loans and HWFG’s credit risk analysis, $400 thousand was added to the allowance for loan losses in the June 2008 quarter. The allowance for loan losses was $6.8 million at June 30, 2008 or .85% of net loan balances.
Deposits
     Retail and commercial deposits (net of California State CD’s of $75.6 million and Brokered CD’s of $30.1 million) were $794.0 million at June 30, 2008 compared to $804.6 million and $770.9 million at March 31, 2008 and June 30, 2007, respectively. Retail and commercial deposits decreased by $10.6 million or 1.3% in the June 2008 quarter, as HWFG sought to re-price its maturing Certificates of Deposit (CD) at attractive rates and rotate CD accounts to its PowerUp program to increase interest margin in future periods. The PowerUp program combines a checking account requiring an automatic transaction

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with an attractively priced money market account and other relationship benefits. The PowerUp account had $133.5 million in balances at June 30, 2008, up $46.7 million in the quarter. The cost of all deposits was 3.2% at June 30, 2008, down 52 bps for the June 2008 quarter and 100 bps for the year-to-date period.
     HWFG is also focused on developing more low and non-costing deposits through a dual pronged program: (1) a sales development and incentive program throughout its banking centers focused on calling on viable commercial and retail DDA prospects, and (2) an incentive and training program for all business and commercial real estate lenders to gather more core deposits from commercial customers in a team approach with the banking centers. HWFG is also adding remote deposit products to enhance customer convenience.
FHLB Advances
     Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) of San Francisco decreased to $192.0 million at June 30, 2008, compared to $207.0 million at June 30, 2007, or 7.2%. For additional information concerning limitations on FHLB advances, see “Liquidity and Capital Resources.”
Stockholders’ Equity
     Stockholders’ equity was $41.9 million at June 30, 2008, as compared to $55.0 million at December 31, 2007, a decrease of $13.1 million or 23.9%. Book value per share, therefore, was $6.83 at June 30, 2008 compared to $9.91 at December 31, 2007. The decrease in stockholders’ equity is due to a decrease of $13.4 million after-tax on the AFS portfolio due to the extreme widening of spreads, an increase of $111 thousand after-tax in the market value of cash flow hedges due to lower interest rates, and a net operating loss of $3.4 million in the first six months of 2008. Additionally, $1.1 million of dividends were paid in the first six months of 2008. Stockholders’ equity was positively influenced by $4.3 million in capital contributions, $233 thousand of additional paid in capital from options exercised, and $177 thousand from stock compensation expensed.
     On April 23, 2008, HWFG completed its previously announced private placement of common stock, raising $4.3 million in proceeds by selling 550 thousand shares at $7.75 per share. $2.2 million of this offering closed as of March 31, 2008, and $2.1 million closed on April 23, 2008, after receiving regulatory approval for a rebuttal of control filing. This capital will be used to support the company’s capital base in the current environment and for growth of the banking franchise. HWFG is taking steps to further increase its capital base with an emphasis on strategies that are not dilutive to its book value per share. To that end, on April 25, 2008, it sold its real estate investment in Princeville, Hawaii for $1.2 million with a net gain of $793 thousand and sold $16.0 million in lower spread earning mortgage loans for an additional pre-tax gain of $255 thousand.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
     Liquidity - The liquidity of Los Padres Bank was 9.05% at June 30, 2008 as compared to 13.3% at June 30, 2007. Los Padres Bank is a consolidated subsidiary of the Company and is monitored closely for regulatory purposes at the Bank level by calculating the ratio of cash, cash equivalents (not committed, pledged or required to liquidate specific liabilities), investments and qualifying mortgage-backed securities to the sum of total deposits plus borrowings payable within one year. At June 30, 2008, Los Padres Bank’s “liquid” assets totaled approximately $91.3 million.
     In general, Los Padres Bank’s liquidity is represented by cash and cash equivalents and is a product of its operating, investing and financing activities. The Bank’s primary sources of internal liquidity consist of deposits, prepayments and maturities of outstanding loans and mortgage-backed and

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related securities, maturities of short-term investments, sales of mortgage-backed and related securities and funds provided from operations. The Bank’s external sources of liquidity consist of borrowings, primarily advances from the FHLB of San Francisco, securities sold under agreements to repurchase and borrowings from the Federal Reserve Bank Discount Window. At June 30, 2008, the Bank had $192.0 million in FHLB advances and had $228.3 million of additional borrowing capacity with the FHLB of San Francisco based on a 35% of total Bank asset limitation. Borrowing capacity from the FHLB is further limited to $65.9 million based on excess collateral pledged at the FHLB as of June 30, 2008. The Bank also had additional borrowing capacity of $25.6 million through the Federal Reserve Bank Discount Window.
     A substantial source of the Company’s cash flow from which it services its debt and capital trust securities, pays its obligations, and pays dividends to its shareholders is the receipt of dividends from Los Padres Bank. The availability of dividends from Los Padres Bank is limited by various statutes and regulations. In order to make such dividend payments, Los Padres Bank is required to provide annual advance notice to the Office of Thrift Supervision (“OTS”), at which time the OTS may object to the proposed dividend payments. It is possible, depending upon the financial condition of Los Padres Bank and other factors, the OTS could object to the payment of dividends by Los Padres Bank on the basis that the payment of such dividends is an unsafe or unsound practice. In the event Los Padres Bank is unable to pay dividends to us, we may not be able to service our debt, pay our obligations, or pay dividends on our common stock.
     Capital Resources. Federally insured savings institutions such as Los Padres Bank are required to maintain minimum levels of regulatory capital. Under applicable regulations, an institution is well capitalized if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of at least 10.0%, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of at least 6.0% and a leverage ratio of at least 5.0%, with no written agreement, order, capital directive, prompt corrective action directive or other individual requirement by the OTS to maintain a specific capital measure. An institution is adequately capitalized if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of at least 8.0% and a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of at least 4.0% and a leverage ratio of at least 4.0% (or 3.0% if it has a composite rating of “1”). The regulation also establishes three categories for institutions with lower ratios: undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized and critically undercapitalized. At June 30, 2008, Los Padres Bank met the capital requirements of a “well capitalized” institution under applicable OTS regulations. At June 30, 2008, the Bank’s Tier 1 (Core) Capital Ratio was 7.07%, Total Risk-Based Capital Ratio was 10.04%, Tier 1 Risk-Based Capital Ratio was 9.37% and Leverage Ratio was 7.07%.
Asset and Liability Management
     The Company evaluates the change in its market value of portfolio equity (“MVPE”) to changes in interest rates and seeks to manage these changes to relatively low levels through various risk management techniques. MVPE is defined as the net present value of the cash flows from an institution’s existing assets, liabilities and off-balance sheet instruments. The MVPE is estimated by valuing the Company’s assets, liabilities and off-balance sheet instruments under various interest rate scenarios. The extent to which assets gain or lose value in relation to the gains or losses of liabilities determines the appreciation or depreciation in equity on a market value basis. MVPE analysis is intended to evaluate the impact of immediate and sustained interest rate shifts of the current yield curve upon the market value of the current balance sheet. In general, financial institutions are negatively affected by an increase in interest rates to the extent that interest-bearing liabilities mature or reprice more rapidly than interest-earning assets. This factor causes the income and MVPE of these institutions to increase as rates fall and decrease as interest rates rise.
     The Company’s management believes that its asset and liability management strategy, as discussed below, provides it with a competitive advantage over other financial institutions. The Company believes that its ability to hedge its interest rate exposure through the use of various interest rate contracts provides it with the flexibility to acquire loans structured to meet its customer’s preferences and

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investments that provide attractive net risk-adjusted spreads, regardless of whether the customer’s loan or our investment is fixed-rate or adjustable-rate or short-term or long-term. Similarly, the Company can choose a cost-effective source of funds and subsequently engage in an interest rate swap or other hedging transaction so that the interest rate sensitivities of its interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities are more closely matched.
     The Company’s asset and liability management strategy is formulated and monitored by the board of directors of Los Padres Bank. The Board’s written policies and procedures are implemented by the Asset and Liability Committee of Los Padres Bank (“ALCO”), which is comprised of Los Padres Bank’s chief executive officer, president, chief financial officer, chief lending officer, president of the Kansas region/chief commercial lending officer, and four non-employee directors of Los Padres Bank. The ALCO meets at least eight times a year to review the sensitivity of Los Padres Bank’s assets and liabilities to interest rate changes, investment opportunities, the performance of the investment portfolios, and prior purchase and sale activity of securities. The ALCO also provides guidance to management on reducing interest rate risk and on investment strategy and retail pricing and funding decisions with respect to Los Padres Bank’s overall asset and liability composition. The ALCO reviews Los Padres Bank’s liquidity, cash flow needs, interest rate sensitivity of investments, deposits and borrowings, core deposit activity, current market conditions and interest rates on both a local and national level in connection with fulfilling its responsibilities.
     The ALCO regularly reviews interest rate risk with respect to the impact of alternative interest rate scenarios on net interest income and on Los Padres Bank’s MVPE. The Asset and Liability Committee also reviews analyses concerning the impact of changing market volatility, prepayment forecast error, and changes in option-adjusted spreads and non-parallel yield curve shifts.
     In the absence of hedging activities, the Company’s MVPE would decline as a result of a general increase in market rates of interest. This decline would be due to the market values of the Company’s assets being more sensitive to interest rate fluctuations than are the market values of its liabilities due to its investment in and origination of generally longer-term assets which are funded with shorter-term liabilities. Consequently, the elasticity (i.e., the change in the market value of an asset or liability as a result of a change in interest rates) of the Company’s assets is greater than the elasticity of its liabilities.
     Accordingly, the primary goal of the Company’s asset and liability management policy is to effectively increase the elasticity of its liabilities and/or effectively contract the elasticity of its assets so that the respective elasticities are matched as closely as possible. This elasticity adjustment can be accomplished internally, by restructuring the balance sheet, or externally by adjusting the elasticities of assets and/or liabilities through the use of interest rate contracts. The Company’s strategy is to hedge, either internally through the use of longer-term certificates of deposit or less sensitive transaction deposits and FHLB advances, or externally through the use of various interest rate contracts.
     External hedging generally involves the use of interest rate swaps, caps, floors, options and futures. The notional amount of interest rate contracts represents the underlying amount on which periodic cash flows are calculated and exchanged between counterparties. However, this notional amount does not necessarily represent the principal amount of securities that would effectively be hedged by that interest rate contract.
     In selecting the type and amount of interest rate contract to utilize, the Company compares the elasticity of a particular contract to that of the securities to be hedged. An interest rate contract with the appropriate offsetting elasticity could have a notional amount much greater than the face amount of the securities being hedged.
     The Company adopted SFAS No. 133, Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities, on January 1, 2001. SFAS No. 133 as amended requires that an entity recognize all interest

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rate contracts as either assets or liabilities in the statement of financial condition and measure those instruments at fair value. If certain conditions are met, an interest rate contract may be specifically designated as a fair value hedge, a cash flow hedge, or a hedge of foreign currency exposure. The accounting for changes in the fair value of an interest rate contract (that is, gains and losses) depends on the intended use of the interest rate contract and the resulting designation. To qualify for hedge accounting, the Company must show that at the inception of the interest rate contracts, and on an ongoing basis, the changes in the fair value of the interest rate contracts are expected to be highly effective in offsetting related changes in the cash flows of the hedged liabilities. The Company has entered into various interest rate swaps for the purpose of hedging certain of its short-term liabilities. These interest rate swaps qualify for hedge accounting. Accordingly, the effective portion of the accumulated change in the fair value of the cash flow hedges is recorded in a separate component of stockholders’ equity, net of tax, while the ineffective portion is recognized in earnings immediately.
     The Company has also entered into various total return swaps in an effort to enhance income, where cash flows are based on the level and changes in the yield spread on investment grade commercial mortgage indexes and asset backed referenced securities relative to similar duration LIBOR swap rates. These swaps do not qualify for hedge accounting treatment and are included in the trading account assets and are reported at fair value with realized and unrealized gains and losses on these instruments recognized in income (loss) from trading account assets.
Critical Accounting Policies
     Critical accounting policies are discussed within our Form 10-K dated December 31, 2007. There are no changes to these policies as of June 30, 2008.
Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements.
     Certain statements contained in this Form 10-Q, including, without limitation, statements containing the words “believes”, “anticipates”, “intends”, “expects”, and words of similar import, constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Such forward looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include, among others, the following: general economic and business conditions in those areas in which we operate, demographic changes, competition, fluctuations in interest rates, changes in business strategy or development plans, changes in governmental regulation, credit quality, the availability of capital to fund the expansion of our business, economic, political and global changes arising from the war on terrorism, the conflict with Iraq and its aftermath, and other factors referenced in our 2007 Annual Report as filed on form 10-K, including in “Item 1A. Risk Factors.”
     Because these forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties, our actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by these statements. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Form 10-Q. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of performance. They involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. The future results and stockholder values of our common stock may differ materially from those expressed in these forward-looking statements. Many of the factors that will determine these results and values are beyond our ability to control or predict.
     We do not undertake any obligation to release publicly any revisions to any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this Form 10-Q or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

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Item 3: Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
     The OTS requires each thrift institution to calculate the estimated change in the institution’s MVPE assuming an instantaneous, parallel shift in the Treasury yield curve of 100 to 300 basis points either up or down in 100 basis point increments. The OTS permits institutions to perform this MVPE analysis using their own internal model based upon reasonable assumptions.
     In estimating the market value of mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities, the Company utilizes various prepayment assumptions, which vary, in accordance with historical experience, based upon the term, interest rate, prepayment penalties, if applicable, and other factors with respect to the underlying loans. At June 30, 2008, these prepayment assumptions varied from 0.0% to 45.0% for fixed-rate mortgages and mortgage-backed securities and varied from 0.0% to 22.0% for adjustable-rate mortgages and mortgage-backed securities.
     The following table sets forth at June 30, 2008, the estimated sensitivity of the Bank’s MVPE to parallel yield curve shifts using the Company’s internal market value calculation which was implemented in the June 2008 quarter. The table demonstrates the sensitivity of the Company’s assets and liabilities both before and after the inclusion of its interest rate contracts.
                                                         
    Change In Interest Rates (In Basis Points) (1)  
    -300     -200     -100     Base     +100     +200     +300  
     
Market value gain (loss) in assets
  $ 33,297     $ 22,957     $ 13,576               ($17,571 )     ($36,191 )     ($54,691 )
Market value gain (loss) of liabilities
    (21,374 )     (13,823 )     (6,730 )             8,296       17,771       28,013  
 
                                                       
     
Market value gain (loss) of net assets before interest rate contracts
    11,923       9,134       6,846               (9,275 )     (18,420 )     (26,678 )
 
                                                       
Market value gain (loss) of interest rate contracts
    (12,302 )     (7,976 )     (3,905 )             3,747       7,345       10,800  
 
                                                       
     
Total change in MVPE (2)
    ($379 )   $ 1,158     $ 2,941               ($ 5,528 )     ($11,075 )     ($15,878 )
     
 
                                                       
Change in MVPE as a percent of:
                                                       
MVPE (2)
    -0.57 %     1.76 %     4.46 %             -8.38 %     -16.80 %     -24.08 %
Total assets of the Bank (3)
    -0.18 %     -0.01 %     0.18 %             -0.38 %     -0.78 %     -1.12 %
 
(1)   Assumes an instantaneous parallel change in interest rates at all maturities.
 
(2)   Based on the Company’s pre-tax tangible MVPE of $65.9 million at June 30, 2008.
 
(3)   Pre-tax tangible MVPE as a percentage of tangible assets.
     The table set forth above does not purport to show the impact of interest rate changes on the Company’s equity under generally accepted accounting principles. Market value changes only impact the Company’s income statement or the balance sheet to the extent the affected instruments are marked to market, and over the life of the instruments as an impact on recorded yields.

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Item 4(T). Controls and Procedures
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
     As of the end of the period covered by this report the Company carried out an evaluation under the supervision and with the participation of the Company’s management, including the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures pursuant to Rule 13a-15(b) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”). The evaluation was based on confirmations provided by a number of senior officers. Based upon that evaluation, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are effective in timely alerting them to material information relating to the Company (including its consolidated subsidiaries) required to be included in the Company’s periodic SEC filings.
Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting
     For the quarter ended June 30, 2008, there have been no significant changes in the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
     Disclosure controls and procedures are Company controls designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management, including its Chief Executive Officer, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. In designing these controls and procedures, management recognizes that they can only provide reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives. Management also evaluated the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures.
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION
Item 1: Legal Proceedings
The Company is involved in various legal proceedings occurring in the ordinary course of business, which, in the aggregate, are believed by management to be immaterial to the financial condition and results of operations of the Company.
Item 1A. Risk Factors
There were no material changes in the second quarter of 2008 to the risk factors discussed in the Company’s 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2007.

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Item 2: Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
During the first six months of 2008, the Company completed a private placement of common shares to eleven accredited investors and directors of the Company and Bank as follows:
                                 
                    Number of        
            Price     Shares     Amount  
Date   Title of Security     Per Share     (In thousands)     (In thousands)  
 
March 27, 2008
  Common   $ 7.75       281     $ 2,178  
April 23, 2008
  Common     7.75       269       2,084  
 
                           
Total
                    550     $ 4,262  
 
                           
The placement was sold on a best-efforts basis by the Company’s officers and directors, and no commissions or investment banking fees were paid for the sale of the shares. $2.1 million of this offering or 269 thousand shares were subject to regulatory approval of a rebuttal of control filing and closed on the April 23, 2008. The sale of the shares was completed in reliance on the exemption provided by Section 4(2) and Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933. The proceeds from this offering will be used for general corporate purposes of the Company, including augmenting capital at the Company’s subsidiary Bank.
Item 3: Defaults Upon Senior Securities
Not applicable.
Item 4: Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders
The following items were submitted to the security holders for approval at the annual meeting held on June 12, 2008.
Election of the following three persons for a term of three years to the Board of Directors of the Company.
The results of the vote were as follows:
                 
NAME   FOR   WITHHELD
Douglas T. Breeden
    4,122,974       238,789  
Craig J. Cerny
    4,108,911       252,852  
John J. McConnell
    4,113,774       247,989  
Ratification of Crowe Chizek and Company, LLP as independent auditors.
                 
FOR   AGAINST   ABSTAIN
4,272,911
    81,652       7,200  

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Item 5: Other Information
Not applicable.
Item 6: Exhibits
     
EXHIBIT NO.   DESCRIPTION
31.1
  Section 302 Certification by Chief Executive Officer filed herewith.
 
   
31.2
  Section 302 Certification by Chief Operating Officer filed herewith.
 
   
31.3
  Section 302 Certification by Chief Financial Officer filed herewith.
 
   
32
  Section 906 Certification by Chief Executive Officer, Chief Operating Officer
 
  and Chief Financial Officer furnished herewith.
SIGNATURES
     Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
         
  HARRINGTON WEST FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.
 
 
August 6, 2008  By:   /s/ Craig J. Cerny    
    Craig J. Cerny   
    Chairman of the Board
and Chief Executive Officer
(Principal Executive Officer) 
 
 
     
August 6, 2008  By:   /s/ William W. Phillips, jr.    
    William W. Phillips, Jr.   
    President, Chief Operating Officer
(Principal Executive Officer) 
 
 
     
August 6, 2008  By:   /s/ KERRIL STEELE    
    Kerril Steele   
    Sr. Vice-President, Chief Financial Officer
(Principle Financial and Accounting Officer) 
 
 

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Ticker: HWFGQ
CIK: 1063997
Form Type: 10-Q Quarterly Report
Accession Number: 0000950137-08-010292
Submitted to the SEC: Wed Aug 06 2008 4:32:42 PM EST
Accepted by the SEC: Wed Aug 06 2008
Period: Monday, June 30, 2008
Industry: Savings Institution Federally Chartered

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