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Columbia Property Trust, Inc. (CXP) SEC Filing 10-K Annual report for the fiscal year ending Monday, December 31, 2012

Columbia Property Trust, Inc.

CIK: 1252849 Ticker: CXP
Document Entity Information (USD $)
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2012
Jan. 31, 2013
Jun. 30, 2012
Document Information [Line Items]      
Entity Registrant Name COLUMBIA PROPERTY TRUST, INC.    
Entity Central Index Key 0001252849    
Current Fiscal Year End Date --12-31    
Entity Filer Category Non-accelerated Filer    
Document Type 10-K    
Document Period End Date Dec. 31, 2012    
Document Fiscal Year Focus 2012    
Document Fiscal Period Focus FY    
Amendment Flag false    
Entity Common Stock, Shares Outstanding   545,627,061  
Entity Public Float     $ 0
Entity Well-known Seasoned Issuer No    
Entity Voluntary Filers No    
Entity Current Reporting Status Yes    

 
 
 
 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 _______________________________________________ 
FORM 10-K
 _______________________________________________
(mark one)
 
 
x
Annual report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
 
 
for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012
 
OR
o
Transition report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
 
for the transition period from ______ to ______
 
Commission file number 000-51262
COLUMBIA PROPERTY TRUST, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Maryland
 
20-0068852
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification Number)
 
One Glenlake Parkway, Suite 1200
Atlanta, Georgia 30328
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
(404) 465-2200
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)
 
 
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of exchange on which registered
NONE
 
NONE
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (g) of the Act:
Common Stock
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Yes  o No  x
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.
Yes  o No  x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Yes  x No  o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
Yes  x No  o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer", "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer o Accelerated filer o Non-accelerated filer x Smaller reporting company o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).
Yes  o No  x
Aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates: _________________
While there is no established market for the registrant's shares of common stock, on November 8, 2012, the registrant announced an estimated per-share value of its common stock equal to $7.33 per share, calculated as of September 30, 2012. The registrant is currently offering shares of its common stock to existing stockholders pursuant to its distribution reinvestment plan at a purchase price of $7.00, which is 95.5% of the estimated per-share value. For a full description of the methodologies used to value the registrant's assets and liabilities in connection with the calculation of the estimated per-share value, see Part II, Item 5, "Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities - Market Information." The number of shares held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2012 was approximately 547,081,420.
Number of shares outstanding of the registrant's
only class of common stock, as of January 31, 2013: 545,627,061 shares
Registrant incorporates by reference portions of the Columbia Property Trust, Inc. Definitive Proxy Statement for the 2013 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (Items 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 of Part III) to be filed on or about April 30, 2013.
 
 
 
 
 



FORM 10-K
COLUMBIA PROPERTY TRUST, INC.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
Page No.
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
 
Item 1A.
 
 
 
Item 1B.
 
 
 
Item 2.
 
 
 
Item 3.
 
 
 
Item 4.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 5.
 
 
 
Item 6.
 
 
 
Item 7.
 
Item 7A.
 
 
 
Item 8.
 
 
 
Item 9.
 
 
 
Item 9A.
 
 
 
Item 9B.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 10.
 
 
 
Item 11.
 
 
 
Item 12.
 
 
 
Item 13.
 
 
 
Item 14.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 15.
 
 
 
 




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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
Certain statements contained in this Form 10-K of Columbia Property Trust, Inc., formerly known as Wells Real Estate Investment Trust II, Inc., and its subsidiaries ("Columbia Property Trust," "we," "our" or "us"), other than historical facts may be considered forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. We intend for all such forward-looking statements to be covered by the applicable safe harbor provisions for forward-looking statements contained in those acts. Such statements include, in particular, statements about our plans, strategies, and prospects and are subject to certain risks and uncertainties, including known and unknown risks, which could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected or anticipated. Such forward-looking statements can generally be identified by our use of forward-looking terminology such as "may," "will," "expect," "intend," "anticipate," "estimate," "believe," "continue," or other similar words. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date this report is filed with the U. S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). We do not intend to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise. See Item 1A herein for a discussion of some of the risks and uncertainties, although not all risks and uncertainties, that could cause actual results to differ materially from those presented in our forward-looking statements.



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PART I
ITEM 1.
BUSINESS
General
On February 25, 2013, Wells Real Estate Investment Trust II, Inc. changed its name to Columbia Property Trust, Inc. ("Columbia Property Trust"). Columbia Property Trust is a Maryland corporation that operates in a manner as to qualify as a real estate investment trust ("REIT") for federal income tax purposes and engages in the acquisition and ownership of commercial real estate properties, including properties that have operating histories, are newly constructed, or are under construction. Columbia Property Trust was incorporated in 2003, commenced operations in 2004, and conducts business primarily through Columbia Property Trust Operating Partnership, L.P., formerly known as Wells Operating Partnership II, L.P. ("Columbia Property Trust OP"), a Delaware limited partnership. Columbia Property Trust is the general partner and sole owner of Columbia Property Trust OP and possesses full legal control and authority over its operations. Columbia Property Trust OP acquires, develops, owns, leases, and operates real properties directly, through wholly owned subsidiaries, or through joint ventures. References to Columbia Property Trust, "we," "us," or "our" herein shall include Columbia Property Trust and all subsidiaries of Columbia Property Trust, direct and indirect, and consolidated joint ventures.
From our inception through February 27, 2013, we have operated as an externally advised REIT pursuant to an advisory agreement under which a subsidiary of Wells Real Estate Funds, Inc. ("WREF"), including most recently Wells Real Estate Advisory Services II, LLC ("WREAS II"), and its affiliates performed certain key functions on our behalf, including, among others, managing our day-to-day operations, investing our capital proceeds, and arranging our financings. Also during this period of time, a subsidiary of WREF, including most recently Wells Real Estate Services, LLC ("WRES"), provided the personnel necessary to carry out property management services on behalf of Wells Management Company, Inc. ("Wells Management") and its affiliates pursuant to the property management agreement described in Note 10, Related-Party Transactions and Agreements, of the accompanying consolidated financial statements. 
On February 28, 2013, we terminated the above-mentioned advisory agreement and property management agreement, and acquired WREAS II and WRES pursuant to assignment options previously entered into with WREF and certain of its affiliates. As a result, the services described above will be performed by our employees going forward (other than the services to be provided by WREF under the Investor Services Agreement). Contemporaneous with this transaction, we entered into a consulting agreement and an investor services agreement with WREF for the remainder of 2013. While no payments were made to exercise our assignment options to acquire WREAS II and WRES, we will pay fees to WREF for consulting and investor services for the remainder of 2013. For additional details about this transaction and the related agreements, please refer to Note 10, Related-Party Transactions and Agreements, of the accompanying consolidated financial statements.
We typically invest in high-quality, income-generating office properties leased to creditworthy companies and governmental entities. As of December 31, 2012, we owned interests in 61 office properties and one hotel, which include 83 operational buildings, comprising approximately 21.0 million square feet of commercial space located in 19 states; the District of Columbia; and Moscow, Russia. Of these office properties, 60 are wholly owned and one is owned through a consolidated subsidiary. As of December 31, 2012, the office properties were approximately 92.9% leased.
Our stock is not listed on a public securities exchange. However, our charter requires that in the event our stock is not listed on a national securities exchange by October 2015, we must either seek stockholder approval to extend or amend this listing deadline or stockholder approval to begin liquidating investments and distributing the resulting proceeds to our stockholders. If we seek stockholder approval to extend or amend this listing date and do not obtain it, we will then be required to seek stockholder approval to liquidate. In this circumstance, if we seek and do not obtain approval to liquidate, we will not be required to list or liquidate and could continue to operate indefinitely as an unlisted company.
Real Estate Investment Objectives
Our primary investment objectives are to support cash distributions to our investors; to preserve, protect, and return our investors' capital contributions; and to seek long-term capital appreciation from our investments.
Our primary investment focus is high-quality commercial office properties in primary markets in the U.S. We believe that the major U.S. office markets provide a greater propensity for producing increasing net income and property values over time. Within these markets our goal is to invest in central business districts and urban infill areas, as well as premier suburban submarkets. We target premier assets that we believe are competitive within the top tier of their markets. Our asset selection criteria include the property's location attributes, physical quality, tenant/lease characteristics, and competitive positioning. Further, we carefully evaluate the creditworthiness of tenants of buildings being considered for acquisition or at the time of signing a new lease at an existing building.


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Our investment philosophy emphasizes diversification of our portfolio for geographic locations, tenants, industry group of tenants, and timing of lease expirations. Prior to making new acquisitions or selling properties in the portfolio, we perform an assessment to ensure that our portfolio is diversified with regard to these criteria to minimize the impact on our portfolio of significant factors affecting a single geographic area, type of property, tenant, or industry group of tenants. Additionally, we analyze annual lease expirations in an attempt to minimize the impact on the cash flows from operations of the portfolio as a whole for properties that may be vacant until re-leased.
Employees
From inception through February 27, 2013, employees of WREAS II, WRES, and their affiliates, including Wells Capital, Inc. ("Wells Capital"), and Wells Management and their subsidiaries, performed substantially all of the services related to our asset management, accounting, investor relations, and other administrative activities that were required under our advisory agreements with WREAS II and its affiliates. As explained in the "General" section above, as of February 28, 2013, these services will be performed directly by employees of Columbia Property Trust (other than the services to be provided by WREF under the Investor Services Agreement), and as of February 28, 2013, we have 96 employees.
Insurance
We believe that our properties are adequately insured.
Competition
Leasing real estate is highly competitive in the current market; as a result, we will experience competition for high-quality tenants from owners and managers of competing projects and may experience delays in re-leasing vacant space, or we may have to provide rent concessions, incur charges for tenant improvements, or offer other inducements to enable us to timely lease vacant space, all of which may have an adverse impact on our results of operations. In addition, we are in competition with other potential buyers for the same properties, which may result in an increase in the amount we must pay to purchase a property or may require us to locate another property that meets our investment criteria. Further, at the time we elect to dispose of our properties, we will also be in competition with sellers of similar properties to locate suitable purchasers.
Concentration of Credit Risk
We are dependent upon the ability of our current tenants to pay their contractual rent amounts as they become due. The inability of a tenant to pay future rental amounts would have a negative impact on our results of operations. We are not aware of any reason why our current tenants will not be able to pay their contractual rental amounts as they become due in all material respects. Situations preventing our tenants from paying contractual rents could result in a material adverse impact on our results of operations.
Website Address
Access to copies of each of our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, proxy statements, and other documents filed with, or furnished to, the SEC, including amendments to such filings, may be obtained free of charge from the following website, http://www.columbiapropertytrust.com, or through a link to the http://www.sec.gov website. These filings are available promptly after we file them with, or furnish them to, the SEC.
ITEM 1A.
RISK FACTORS
Below are some of the risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those presented in our forward-looking statements. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face but do represent those risks and uncertainties that we believe are material to our business, operating results, prospects, and financial condition. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial may also harm our business.
Risks Related to Current Economic Conditions
If we are unable to find suitable investments or pay too much for properties, we may not be able to achieve our investment objectives, and the returns on our investments will be lower than they otherwise would be.
We are competing for real estate investments with other REITs; real estate limited partnerships, pension funds and their advisors; bank and insurance company investment accounts; individuals; and other entities. Over the past few years, relatively few high-quality assets have traded hands in the commercial real estate marketplace. As a result, over this period of time, many real estate investors have built up their cash positions and are eager to invest in quality real estate assets. A significant number of entities and resources competing for high-quality office properties support relatively high acquisition prices for such properties, which could


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put pressure on our profitability and our ability to pay distributions to stockholders. We cannot be sure that we will be successful in obtaining suitable investments on financially attractive terms or that, if we make investments, our objectives will be achieved.
Current economic conditions may cause the creditworthiness of our tenants to deteriorate and occupancy and market rental rates to decline.
During 2012, 2011, and 2010, economic conditions adversely affected the financial condition and liquidity of many businesses, as well as the demand for office space generally. Should such economic conditions continue for a prolonged period of time, our tenants' ability to honor their contractual obligations may suffer. Further, it may become increasingly difficult to maintain our occupancy rate and achieve future rental rates comparable to the rental rates of our currently in-place leases as we seek to re-lease space and/or to renew existing leases.
Our office properties were approximately 92.9% leased at December 31, 2012, and provisions for uncollectible tenant receivables, net of recoveries, were less than 0.1% of total revenues for the year then ended. As a percentage of 2012 annualized lease revenue, approximately 5% of leases expire in 2013, 3% of leases expire in 2014, and 7% of leases expire in 2015 (see Item 2). No assurances can be given that current economic conditions will not have a material adverse effect on our ability to re-lease space at favorable rates or on our ability to maintain our current occupancy rate and our low provisions for uncollectible tenant receivables.
The current offering price of shares under our distribution reinvestment plan ("DRP") may exceed the price at which we will offer shares under our DRP in the future.
On November 8, 2012, we announced an estimated per-share value of our common stock equal to $7.33 per share, calculated as of September 30, 2012, and we are currently offering shares under our DRP at 95.5% of this estimated per-share value, or $7.00. Prior to this valuation, we offered shares in our DRP at 95.5% of the previous estimated per-share value (or, $7.13). We intend to update the estimated per-share value on an annual basis. After reporting an updated per-share estimated value, the purchase price of the shares of common stock under our DRP will be equal to 95.5% of the per-share estimated value. If real estate market fundamentals continue to deteriorate, the current offering price under our DRP may exceed the price at which we will offer shares after our annual update of our estimated per-share value.
General Risks Related to Investments in Real Estate
Changes in general economic conditions and regulatory matters germane to the real estate industry may cause our operating results to suffer and the value of our real estate properties to decline.
Our operating results will be subject to risks generally incident to the ownership of real estate, including:
changes in general or local economic conditions;
changes in supply of or demand for similar or competing properties in an area;
changes in interest rates and availability of permanent mortgage funds, which may render the sale of a property difficult or unattractive;
changes in tax, real estate, environmental, and zoning laws; and
periods of high interest rates and tight money supply.
These and other reasons may prevent us from being profitable or from realizing growth or maintaining the value of our real estate properties.
Properties that have significant vacancies could be difficult to sell, which could diminish our return on those properties.
Our properties' market values depend principally upon the value of the properties' leases. A property may incur vacancies either by the default of tenants under their leases or the expiration of tenant leases. If vacancies occur and continue for a prolonged period of time, it may become difficult to locate suitable buyers, and property resale values may suffer, which could result in lower returns for our stockholders.
We depend on tenants for our revenue, and lease defaults or terminations could reduce our net income and limit our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.
The success of our investments materially depends on the financial stability of our tenants. A default or termination by a significant tenant on its lease payments to us would cause us to lose the revenue associated with such lease and require us to find an alternative source of revenue to meet mortgage payments and prevent a foreclosure if the property is subject to a mortgage. In the event of a


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tenant default or bankruptcy, we may experience delays in enforcing our rights as landlord and may incur substantial costs in protecting our investment and re-letting our property. If a tenant defaults on or terminates a significant lease, we may be unable to lease the property for the rent previously received or sell the property without incurring a loss. These events could cause us to reduce the amount of distributions to stockholders.
Our inability to sell a property when we plan to do so could limit our ability to pay cash distributions to our stockholders.
General economic conditions, availability of financing, interest rates, and other factors, including supply and demand, all of which are beyond our control, affect the real estate market. We may be unable to sell a property for the price, on the terms, or within the time frame that we want. That inability could reduce our cash flow and cause our results of operations to suffer, limiting our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.
Uninsured losses relating to real property or excessively expensive premiums for insurance coverage could reduce our net income.
There are types of losses, generally catastrophic in nature, such as losses due to wars, acts of terrorism, earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, pollution, or environmental matters, that are uninsurable or not economically insurable, or may be insured subject to limitations, such as large deductibles or co-payments. Insurance risks associated with potential terrorist acts could sharply increase the premiums we pay for coverage against property and casualty claims. Additionally, mortgage lenders in some cases have begun to insist that commercial property owners purchase coverage against terrorism as a condition of providing mortgage loans. Such insurance policies may not be available at a reasonable cost, if at all, which could inhibit our ability to finance or refinance our properties. In such instances, we may be required to provide other financial support, either through financial assurances or self-insurance, to cover potential losses. We may not have adequate coverage for such losses. If any of our properties incur a casualty loss that is not fully insured, the value of that asset will be reduced by such uninsured loss. In addition, other than any working capital reserves or other reserves that we may establish, or our existing line of credit, we do not have sources of funding specifically designated for funding repairs or reconstruction of any uninsured damaged property. Also, to the extent we must pay unexpectedly large amounts for insurance, we could suffer reduced earnings that would result in lower distributions to stockholders.
Our operating results may suffer because of potential development and construction delays and resultant increased costs and risks.
We may acquire and develop properties, including unimproved real properties, upon which we will construct improvements. We will be subject to uncertainties associated with rezoning for development, environmental concerns of governmental entities and/or community groups; and our builders' ability to build in conformity with plans, specifications, budgeted costs, and timetables. If a builder fails to perform, we may resort to legal action to rescind the purchase or the construction contract or to compel performance. A builder's performance may also be affected or delayed by conditions beyond the builder's control. Delays in completing construction could also give tenants the right to terminate preconstruction leases. We may incur additional risks when we make periodic progress payments or other advances to builders before they complete construction. These and other factors can result in increased costs of a project or loss of our investment. In addition, we will be subject to normal lease-up risks relating to newly constructed projects. We also must rely on rental income and expense projections and estimates of the fair market value of property upon completion of construction when agreeing upon a purchase price at the time we acquire the property. If our projections are inaccurate, we may pay too much for a property, and our return on our investment could suffer.
Costs of complying with governmental laws and regulations may reduce our net income and the cash available for distributions to our stockholders.
All real property and the operations conducted on real property are subject to federal, state, and local laws and regulations relating to environmental protection and human health and safety. Some of these laws and regulations may impose joint and several liability on tenants, owners, or operators for the costs to investigate or remediate contaminated properties, regardless of fault or whether the acts causing the contamination were legal. In addition, the presence of hazardous substances, or the failure to properly remediate these substances, may hinder our ability to sell, rent, or pledge such property as collateral for future borrowings.
Compliance with new laws or regulations, or stricter interpretation of existing laws may require us to incur material expenditures. Future laws, ordinances, or regulations may impose material environmental liability. Additionally, our tenants' operations, the existing condition of land when we buy it, operations in the vicinity of our properties, such as the presence of underground storage tanks or activities of unrelated third parties may affect our properties. In addition, there are various local, state, and federal fire, health, life-safety, and similar regulations with which we may be required to comply, and which may subject us to liability in the form of fines or damages for noncompliance. Any material expenditures, fines, or damages we must pay will reduce our ability to make distributions.



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Discovery of previously undetected environmentally hazardous conditions may decrease our revenues and limit our ability to make distributions.
Under various federal, state, and local environmental laws, ordinances, and regulations, a current or previous real property owner or operator may be liable for the cost to remove or remediate hazardous or toxic substances on, under, or in such property. These costs could be substantial. Such laws often impose liability whether or not the owner or operator knew of, or was responsible for, the presence of such hazardous or toxic substances. Environmental laws also may impose restrictions on the manner in which property may be used or businesses may be operated, and these restrictions may require substantial expenditures or prevent us from entering into leases with prospective tenants that may be impacted by such laws. Environmental laws provide for sanctions for noncompliance and may be enforced by governmental agencies or, in certain circumstances, by private parties. Certain environmental laws and common law principles could be used to impose liability for release of and exposure to hazardous substances, including asbestos-containing materials. Third parties may seek recovery from real property owners or operators for personal injury or property damage associated with exposure to released hazardous substances. The cost of defending against claims of liability, of complying with environmental regulatory requirements, of remediating any contaminated property, or of paying personal injury claims could reduce the amounts available for distribution to our stockholders.
If we sell properties and provide financing to purchasers, defaults by the purchasers would decrease our cash flows and limit our ability to make distributions.
In some instances we may sell our properties by providing financing to purchasers. When we provide financing to purchasers, we will bear the risk that the purchaser may default, which could negatively impact our cash distributions to stockholders. Even in the absence of a purchaser default, the distribution of the proceeds of sales to our stockholders, or the reinvestment of proceeds in other assets, will be delayed until the promissory notes or other property we may accept upon a sale are actually paid, sold, refinanced, or otherwise disposed.
Risks Related to an Investment in Us
Our net income, Funds From Operations ("FFO"), and Adjusted Funds From Operations ("AFFO") may decrease in the near- term as a result of our transition to a self-managed REIT.
Our net income, FFO, and AFFO may decrease as a result of becoming a self-managed REIT. While we will no longer bear the costs of the various fees and expense reimbursements previously paid to our external advisor, our expenses will include the compensation and benefits of our officers, employees, and consultants, as well as overhead previously paid by our external advisor or their affiliates. Furthermore, these employees will be providing us services historically provided by our external advisor. There are no assurances that, following our transition to a self-managed platform, we will be able to provide those services at the same level or for the same costs as were previously provided to us by our external advisor, and there may be unforeseen costs, expenses, and difficulties associated with providing those services on a self-advised basis. If the expenses we assume as a result of becoming self-managed are higher than we anticipate, our net income, FFO, and AFFO may be lower as a result of the transition to self-management than it otherwise would have been.
We may be exposed to risks to which we have not historically been exposed.
Our transition to a self-managed platform will expose us to risks to which we have not historically been exposed. Excluding the effect of the eliminated asset management fees, our direct overhead, on a consolidated basis, will increase as a result of becoming self-advised. Effective February 28, 2013, we directly employed persons who were previously associated with the advisor or its affiliates. As their employer, we are subject to those potential liabilities that are commonly faced by employers, such as workers' disability and compensation claims, potential labor disputes, and other employee-related liabilities and grievances, and we bear the costs of the establishment and maintenance of any employee compensation plans. Furthermore, these employees will be providing us services historically provided by our external advisor with the support of a consulting services agreement and a transition services agreement. There are no assurances that we will be able to provide the same level of services when we are self-advised as were previously provided to us under our agreements with WREF and its affiliates, and there may be unforeseen costs, expenses, and difficulties associated with providing services previously provided by WREF and its affiliates.
We are dependent on our own executive officers and employees.
Effective February 28, 2013, we rely on a small number of persons, particularly E. Nelson Mills, to carry out our business and investment strategies. Any of our senior management, including Mr. Mills, may cease to provide services to us at any time. In addition, Douglas P. Williams has resigned as our Executive Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer. Therefore, certain of our previous executive officers will no longer be involved in the day-to-day operations of Columbia Property Trust. The loss of the services of any of our key management personnel or our inability to recruit and retain qualified personnel in the future, could have an adverse effect on our business and financial results. As we expand, we will continue to try to attract and retain qualified additional senior management, but may not be able to do so on acceptable terms.


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There is no public trading market for our shares; therefore, it will be difficult for our stockholders to sell their shares.
There is no current public market for our shares, and we currently have no immediate plans to list our shares on a national securities exchange. Our charter also prohibits the ownership of more than 9.8% of our stock, unless exempted by our board of directors, which may inhibit large-scale investors from desiring to purchase our shares. Our board of directors has adopted a share redemption program (the "SRP"). We suspended Ordinary Redemptions (i.e., redemptions sought in cases other than in connection with a "qualifying disability," qualification for federal assistance for confinement to a long-term care facility, or within two years of a stockholder's death) from September 2009 to September 2010. Effective December 12, 2011, the price for Ordinary Redemptions was set at $6.25, which is significantly below the most recently stated estimated per-share value. The SRP includes numerous restrictions that limit a stockholder's ability to sell his or her shares to us, and our board of directors may amend, suspend, or terminate our share redemption program upon 30 days' notice. Therefore, it will be difficult for our stockholders to sell their shares promptly or at all. If a stockholder is able to sell his or her shares, it may be at a substantial discount to the most recently published estimated share value. It is also likely that our shares would not be accepted as the primary collateral for a loan.
We may be unable to pay or maintain cash distributions or increase distributions over time, which could reduce the funds we have available for investment and the return to our investors.
There are many factors that can affect the availability and timing of distributions to stockholders. We expect to continue to fund distributions principally from cash flow from operations; however, from time to time, we may elect to fund a portion of our distributions from borrowings or from net equity proceeds raised under our DRP. If we fund distributions from financings or the net equity proceeds pursuant to our DRP, we will have fewer funds available for the investment in, and acquisition of, properties; thus, the overall return to our investors may be reduced. Further, to the extent distributions exceed cash flow from operations, a stockholder's basis in our stock will be reduced and, to the extent distributions exceed a stockholder's basis, the stockholder may recognize capital gain. We can give no assurance that we will be able to pay or maintain cash distributions or increase distributions over time.
Our charter limits the number of shares a person may own, which may discourage a takeover that could otherwise result in a premium price to our stockholders.
Our charter, with certain exceptions, authorizes our directors to take such actions as are necessary and desirable to preserve our qualification as a REIT. Unless exempted by our board of directors, no person may own more than 9.8% of our outstanding common stock. This restriction may have the effect of delaying, deferring, or preventing a change in control, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer, or sale of all or substantially all of our assets) that might provide a premium price for holders of our common stock.
Our charter permits our board of directors to issue stock with terms that may subordinate the rights of our common stockholders or discourage a third party from acquiring us in a manner that could result in a premium price to our stockholders.
Our board of directors may classify or reclassify any unissued common stock or preferred stock and establish the preferences; conversion; or other rights, voting powers, restrictions, or limitations as to distributions, qualifications, and terms or conditions of redemption of any such stock. Thus, our board of directors could authorize the issuance of preferred stock with terms and conditions that could have priority as to distributions and amounts payable upon liquidation over the rights of the holders of our common stock. Such preferred stock could also have the effect of delaying, deferring, or preventing a change in control of us, including an extraordinary transaction (such as a merger, tender offer, or sale of all or substantially all of our assets) that might provide a premium price to holders of our common stock.
Our stockholders have limited control over changes in our policies and operations, which increases the uncertainty and risks they face.
Our board of directors determines our major policies, including our policies regarding financing, growth, debt capitalization, REIT qualification, and distributions. Our board of directors may amend or revise these and other policies without a vote of the stockholders. Under Maryland General Corporation Law, our stockholders have a right to vote only on limited matters. Our board's broad discretion in setting policies and our stockholders' inability to exert control over those policies increases the uncertainty and risks stockholders face.
Our organizational documents contain provisions which may discourage a takeover of us and could depress the price of our shares of common stock.
Our organizational documents contain provisions which may discourage a takeover of us and could depress the price of our common stock. Our organizational documents contain provisions which may have an anti-takeover effect, inhibit a change of our management, or inhibit in certain circumstances, tender offers for our common stock or proxy contests to change our board. These provisions include: directors may be removed only for cause; the stockholders are restricted from altering the number of directors;


Page 9


ownership limits and restrictions on transferability that are intended to enable us to continue to qualify as a REIT; broad discretion of our board to take action, without stockholder approval, to issue new classes of securities that may discourage a third party from acquiring us; the ability, through board action or bylaw amendment to opt-in to certain provisions of Maryland law that may impede efforts to effect a change in control of us; advance notice requirements for stockholder proposals and stockholder nominations of directors; and the absence of cumulative voting rights.
Maryland General Corporation Law provides certain protections relating to deterring or defending hostile takeovers, which may discourage others from trying to acquire control of us and may prevent our stockholders from receiving a premium price for their stock in connection with a business combination.
Under Maryland law, "business combinations" between a Maryland corporation and certain interested stockholders or affiliates of interested stockholders are prohibited for five years after the most recent date on which the interested stockholder becomes an interested stockholder. These business combinations include a merger, consolidation, share exchange, or, in circumstances specified in the statute, an asset transfer or issuance or reclassification of equity securities. Also under Maryland law, control shares of a Maryland corporation acquired in a control share acquisition have no voting rights except to the extent approved by a vote of two-thirds of the votes entitled to be cast on the matter. Shares owned by the acquirer, an officer of the corporation, or an employee of the corporation who is also a director of the corporation are excluded from the vote on whether to accord voting rights to the control shares. Our board of directors has determined to make the application of these provisions of Maryland law available to us; therefore, it may discourage others from trying to acquire control of us and increase the difficulty of consummating any offer. Similarly, provisions of Title 3, Subtitle 8 of the Maryland General Corporation Law, which our board of directors could elect, provide similar anti-takeover protection.
Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure
If we are unable to fund the future capital needs of our properties, cash distributions to our stockholders and the value of our investments could decline.
When tenants do not renew their leases or otherwise vacate their space, we will often need to expend substantial funds for tenant improvements to the vacated space in order to attract replacement tenants. In addition, although we expect that our leases with tenants will require tenants to pay routine property maintenance costs, we will likely be responsible for any major structural repairs, such as repairs to the foundation, exterior walls, and rooftops.
If we need significant capital in the future to improve or maintain our properties or for any other reason, we will have to obtain financing from sources such as cash flow from operations, borrowings, property sales, or future equity offerings. These sources of funding may not be available on attractive terms or at all. If we cannot procure the necessary funding for capital improvements, our investments may generate lower cash flows or decline in value, or both, which would limit our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.
Some of our directors' loyalties to other WREF-sponsored programs could influence their judgment, resulting in actions that are not in our stockholders' best interest or that result in a disproportionate benefit to another WREF-sponsored program at our expense.
Some of our directors are also directors or officers of other WREF-sponsored programs. Specifically, three of our directors (including one of our independent directors) are also directors of other WREF-sponsored real estate programs. The loyalties of our directors serving on another board may influence the judgment of our board when considering issues for us that also may affect other WREF-sponsored programs, such as the following:
We could enter into transactions with other WREF-sponsored programs, such as property sales or acquisitions, joint ventures, or financing arrangements. Decisions of the board or the Conflicts Committee regarding the terms of those transactions may be influenced by the board's or committee's loyalties to other WREF-sponsored programs.
A decision of the board or the Conflicts Committee regarding the timing of a debt or equity offering could be influenced by concerns that the offering would compete with an offering of other WREF-sponsored programs.
A decision of the board or the Conflicts Committee regarding the timing of property sales could be influenced by concerns that the sales would compete with those of other WREF-sponsored programs.
Federal Income Tax Risks
Failure to qualify as a REIT would reduce our net income and cash available for distributions.
Our qualification as a REIT depends upon our ability to meet requirements regarding our organization and ownership, distributions of our income, the nature and diversification of our income and assets, and other tests imposed by the Internal Revenue Code


Page 10


(the "Code"). If we fail to qualify as a REIT for any taxable year, we will be subject to federal and state income tax on our taxable income at corporate rates and/or penalties. In addition, we would generally be disqualified from treatment as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year of losing our REIT status. Losing our REIT status would reduce our net earnings available for investment or distribution to stockholders because of the additional tax liability. In addition, distributions to stockholders would no longer qualify for the dividends-paid deduction, and we would no longer be required to make distributions. If this occurs, we might be required to borrow funds or liquidate some investments in order to pay the applicable tax.
Recharacterization of sale-leaseback transactions may cause us to lose our REIT status, which would reduce the return to our stockholders.
We may purchase properties and lease them back to the sellers of such properties. While we will use our best efforts to structure any such sale-leaseback transaction such that the lease will be characterized as a "true lease," thereby allowing us to be treated as the owner of the property for federal income tax purposes, we can give no assurance that the Internal Revenue Service will not challenge such characterization. In the event that any such sale-leaseback transaction is challenged and recharacterized as a financing transaction or loan for federal income tax purposes, deductions for depreciation and cost recovery relating to such property would be disallowed. If a sale-leaseback transaction was so recharacterized, we might fail to satisfy the REIT qualification asset tests or income tests and, consequently, lose our REIT status. Alternatively, the amount of our REIT taxable income could be recalculated, which might also cause us to fail to meet the distribution requirement for a taxable year.
Stockholders may have current tax liability on distributions they elect to reinvest in our common stock.
Participants in our DRP will be deemed to have received, and for income tax purposes will be taxed on, the amount reinvested in shares of our common stock to the extent the amount reinvested was not a tax-free return of capital. In addition, participants will be treated for tax purposes as having received an additional distribution to the extent the shares are purchased at a discount to fair market value, if any. As a result, and except with respect to tax-exempt entities, participants in our DRP may have to use funds from other sources to pay the tax liability on the value of the shares of common stock they receive.
Even if we qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we may be subject to other tax liabilities that reduce our cash flow and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.
Even if we remain qualified as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we may be subject to some federal, state, and local taxes on our income or property. For example:
In order to qualify as a REIT, we must distribute annually at least 90% of our REIT taxable income to our stockholders (which is determined without regard to the dividends-paid deduction or net capital gain). To the extent that we satisfy the distribution requirement but distribute less than 100% of our REIT taxable income, we will be subject to federal and state corporate income tax on the undistributed income.
We will be subject to a 4% nondeductible excise tax on the amount, if any, by which distributions we pay in any calendar year are less than the sum of 85% of our ordinary income, 95% of our capital gains net income, and 100% of our undistributed income from prior years.
If we have net income from the sale of foreclosure property that we hold primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business or other nonqualifying income from foreclosure property, we must pay a tax on that income at the highest corporate income tax rate.
If we sell a property, other than foreclosure property, that we hold primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business, our gain would be subject to the 100% "prohibited transaction" tax.
We may perform additional, noncustomary services for tenants of our buildings through our taxable REIT subsidiary, including real estate or non-real-estate-related services; however, any earnings related to such services are subject to federal and state income taxes.
To maintain our REIT status, we may be forced to borrow funds during unfavorable market conditions to make distributions to our stockholders, which could increase our operating costs and decrease the value of an investment in us.
To qualify as a REIT, we must distribute to our stockholders each year 90% of our REIT taxable income (which is determined without regard to the dividends-paid deduction or net capital gains). At times, we may not have sufficient funds to satisfy these distribution requirements and may need to borrow funds to maintain our REIT status and avoid the payment of income and excise taxes. These borrowing needs could result from (i) differences in timing between the actual receipt of cash and inclusion of income for federal income tax purposes; (ii) the effect of nondeductible capital expenditures; (iii) the creation of reserves; or (iv) required


Page 11


debt or amortization payments. We may need to borrow funds at times when market conditions are unfavorable. Such borrowings could increase our costs and reduce the value of our common stock.
To maintain our REIT status, we may be forced to forego otherwise attractive opportunities, which could delay or hinder our ability to meet our investment objectives and lower the return to our stockholders.
To qualify as a REIT, we must satisfy tests on an ongoing basis concerning, among other things, the sources of our income, the nature of our assets, and the amounts we distribute to our stockholders. We may be required to make distributions to stockholders at times when it would be more advantageous to reinvest cash in our business or when we do not have funds readily available for distribution. Compliance with the REIT requirements may hinder our ability to operate solely on the basis of maximizing profits.
Because of the ownership structure of our hotel property, we face potential adverse effects from changes to the applicable tax laws.
We own one hotel property. However, under the Code, REITs are not allowed to operate hotels directly or indirectly. Accordingly, we lease our hotel property to our taxable REIT subsidiary, or TRS. As lessor, we are entitled to a percentage of the gross receipts from the operation of the hotel property. Marriott Hotel Services, Inc. manages the hotel under the Marriott® name pursuant to a management contract with the TRS as lessee. While the TRS structure allows the economic benefits of ownership to flow to us, the TRS is subject to tax on its income from the operations of the hotel at the federal and state levels. In addition, the TRS is subject to detailed tax regulations that affect how it may be capitalized and operated. If the tax laws applicable to our TRS are changed, we may be forced to modify the structure for owning our hotel property or selling our hotel property, which may adversely affect our cash flows. In addition, the Internal Revenue Service, the United States Treasury Department, and Congress frequently review federal income tax legislation, and we cannot predict whether, when, or to what extent new federal tax laws, regulations, interpretations, or rulings will be adopted. Any of such actions may prospectively or retroactively modify the tax treatment of the TRS and, therefore, may adversely affect our after-tax returns from our hotel property.
Foreign currency gains may threaten our REIT status, and foreign currency losses may reduce the income received from our foreign investments.
Foreign currency gains that we derive from certain of our investments will be treated as qualifying income for purposes of the REIT income tests if such gains are derived with respect to underlying income that itself qualifies for purposes of the REIT income tests, such as interest on loans that are secured by mortgages on real property. Other foreign currency gains, however, will be treated as income that does not qualify under the 95% or 75% gross income tests, unless certain technical requirements are met. No assurance can be given that these technical requirements will be met in the case of any foreign currency gains that we recognize directly or through pass-through subsidiaries, or that those technical requirements will not adversely affect our ability to satisfy the REIT qualification requirements. Although we may hedge our foreign currency risk subject to the REIT income qualification tests, we may not be able to do so successfully and may incur losses on these investments as a result of exchange rate fluctuations.
Foreign taxes we incur will not be creditable to or otherwise pass through to our stockholders.
Taxes that we pay in foreign jurisdictions may not be passed through to, or be used by our stockholders as a foreign tax credit or otherwise.
Legislative or regulatory action could adversely affect investors.
In recent years, numerous legislative, judicial, and administrative changes have been made in the provisions of federal and state income tax laws applicable to investments similar to an investment in shares of Columbia Property Trust. Additional changes to tax laws are likely to continue to occur in the future, and we cannot assure you that any such changes will not adversely affect the taxation of our stockholders. Any such changes could have an adverse effect on an investment in shares or on the market value or the resale potential of our properties. You are urged to consult with your own tax advisor with respect to the impact of recent legislation on your ownership of shares and the status of legislative, regulatory, or administrative developments and proposals, and their potential effect on ownership of shares.
Risks Associated with Debt Financing
We have incurred and are likely to continue to incur mortgage and other indebtedness, which may increase our business risks.
As of February 15, 2013, our total indebtedness was approximately $1.6 billion, which includes a $450.0 million term loan, $248.7 million of bonds, and $909.4 million of mortgage loans, all with fixed interest rates, or with interest rates that are effectively fixed when considered in connection with an interest rate swap agreement; and $40.0 million outstanding on our variable-rate line of credit. We are likely to incur additional indebtedness to acquire properties, to fund property improvements and other capital expenditures, to redeem shares under our share redemption program, to pay our distributions, and for other purposes.


Page 12


Significant borrowings by us increase the risks of an investment in us. If there is a shortfall between the cash flow from properties and the cash flow needed to service our indebtedness, then the amount available for distributions to stockholders may be reduced. In addition, incurring mortgage debt increases the risk of loss since defaults on indebtedness secured by a property may result in lenders initiating foreclosure actions. In that case, we could lose the property securing the loan that is in default. For tax purposes, a foreclosure of any of our properties would be treated as a sale of the property for a purchase price equal to the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage. If the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage exceeds our tax basis in the property, we would recognize taxable income on foreclosure, but we would not receive any cash proceeds. We may give full or partial guarantees to lenders of mortgage debt on behalf of the entities that own our properties. When we give a guaranty on behalf of an entity that owns one of our properties, we will be responsible to the lender for satisfaction of the debt if it is not paid by such entity.
If any mortgages or other indebtedness contain cross-collateralization or cross-default provisions, a default on a single loan could affect multiple properties. Our unsecured credit facility with a syndicate of lenders led by JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. ("JPMorgan Chase Bank"), as administrative agent (the "JPMorgan Chase Credit Facility") includes a cross-default provision that provides that a payment default under any recourse obligation of $10 million or more by us, Columbia Property Trust OP, or any of our subsidiaries, constitutes a default under the line of credit. If any of our properties are foreclosed on due to a default, our ability to pay cash distributions to our stockholders will be limited.
High mortgage interest rates may make it difficult for us to finance or refinance properties, which could reduce the number of properties we can acquire, our net income, and the amount of cash distributions we can make.
If mortgage debt is unavailable at reasonable interest rates, we may not be able to finance the purchase of properties. If we place mortgage debt on properties, we run the risk of being unable to refinance the properties when the loans become due, or of being unable to refinance on favorable terms. If interest rates are higher when we refinance the properties, our income could be reduced. If any of these events occur, our cash flow would be reduced. This, in turn, would reduce cash available for distribution to our stockholders and may hinder our ability to raise more capital by issuing more stock or by borrowing more money.
Lenders may require us to enter into restrictive covenants relating to our operations, which could limit our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.
When providing financing, a lender may impose restrictions on us that affect our distribution and operating policies and our ability to incur additional debt. Loan documents we enter into may contain covenants that limit our ability to further mortgage the property, discontinue insurance coverage, or replace our advisor, WREAS II. These or other limitations may limit our flexibility and our ability to achieve our operating plans.
Increases in interest rates could increase the amount of our debt payments and limit our ability to pay distributions to our stockholders.
We expect to incur additional indebtedness in the future, which may include mortgages, unsecured bonds, term loans, or borrowings under a credit facility. Increases in interest rates will increase interest costs on our variable-interest debt instruments, which would reduce our cash flows and our ability to pay distributions. In addition, if we need to repay existing debt during periods of higher interest rates, we might sell one or more of our investments in order to repay the debt, which sale at that time might not permit realization of the maximum return on such investments. For additional information, please refer to Item 7A., Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk, for additional information regarding interest rate risk.
We have broad authority to incur debt, and high debt levels could hinder our ability to make distributions and could decrease the value of an investment in us.
Our policies do not limit the amount of debt we may incur. High debt levels would cause us to incur higher interest charges, would result in higher debt service payments, and could be accompanied by restrictive covenants. These factors could limit the amount of cash we have available to distribute and could result in a decline in the value of an investment in us.
International Business Risks
We are subject to additional risks from our international investments.
We purchased the Dvintsev Business Center – Tower B, located in Moscow, Russia, during 2009. We may also purchase additional properties located outside the United States. These investments may be affected by factors particular to the laws and business practices of the jurisdictions in which the properties are located. These laws and business practices may expose us to risks that are different from and in addition to those commonly found in the United States. Foreign investments include the following risks:
the burden of complying with a wide variety of foreign laws, including:


Page 13


changing governmental rules and policies, including changes in land use and zoning laws, more stringent environmental laws, or changes in such laws; and
existing or new laws relating to the foreign ownership of real property or mortgages and laws restricting the ability of foreign persons or companies to remove profits earned from activities within the country to the person's or company's country of origin;
the potential for expropriation;
possible currency transfer restrictions;
imposition of adverse or confiscatory taxes;
changes in real estate and other tax rates, and changes in other operating expenses in particular countries;
possible challenges to the anticipated tax treatment of the structures that allow us to acquire and hold investments;
adverse market conditions caused by terrorism, civil unrest, and changes in national or local governmental or economic conditions;
the willingness of domestic or foreign lenders to make mortgage loans in certain countries and changes in the availability, cost, and terms of mortgage funds resulting from varying national economic policies;
general political and economic instability in certain regions;
the potential difficulty of enforcing obligations in other countries;
our willingness, or inability as a result of the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, to comply with local business customs in certain regions; and
our advisor's limited experience and expertise in foreign countries relative to its experience and expertise in the United States.
Investments in properties outside the United States may subject us to foreign currency risks, which may adversely affect distributions.
Investments outside the United States may be subject to foreign currency risk due to potential fluctuations in exchange rates between foreign currencies and the U.S. dollar. As a result, changes in exchange rates of any such foreign currency to U.S. dollars may affect our revenues, operating margins, and distributions and may also affect the book value of our assets and the amount of stockholders' equity. Our ability to hedge such currency risk may be limited or cost-prohibitive in certain countries.
Certain foreign currency gains may threaten our REIT status, and foreign currency losses may reduce the income received from our foreign investments. Further, bank accounts held in a foreign currency, which are not considered cash or cash equivalents, may threaten our status as a REIT.
Risks Related to Investments by Tax-Exempt Entities and Benefit Plans Subject to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act ("ERISA")
If you fail to meet the fiduciary and other standards under ERISA or the Internal Revenue Code as a result of an investment in our stock, you could be subject to criminal and civil penalties.
There are special considerations that apply to employee benefit plans subject to ERISA (such as profit-sharing, Section 401(k), or pension plans) and other retirement plans or accounts subject to Section 4975 of the Code (such as an individual retirement account, or "IRA") that are investing in our shares. If you are investing the assets of such a plan or account in our common stock, you should satisfy yourself that:
your investment is consistent with your fiduciary and other obligations under ERISA and the Code;
your investment is made in accordance with the documents and instruments governing your plan or IRA, including your plan's or account's investment policy;
your investment satisfies the prudence and diversification requirements of Sections 404(a)(1)(B) and 404(a)(1)(C) of ERISA and other applicable provisions of ERISA and the Code;



Page 14


your investment in our shares, for which no trading market may exist, is consistent with the liquidity needs of the plan or IRA;
your investment will not produce an unacceptable amount of "unrelated business taxable income" for the plan or IRA;
you will be able to comply with the requirements under ERISA and the Code to value the assets of the plan or IRA annually; and
your investment will not constitute a prohibited transaction under Section 406 of ERISA or Section 4975 of the Code.
Failure to satisfy the fiduciary standards of conduct and other applicable requirements of ERISA and the Code may result in the imposition of civil and criminal penalties and could subject the fiduciary to claims for damages or for equitable remedies. In addition, if an investment in our shares constitutes a prohibited transaction under ERISA or the Code, the fiduciary or IRA owner who authorized or directed the investment may be subject to the imposition of excise taxes with respect to the amount invested. In the case of a prohibited transaction involving an IRA owner, the IRA may be disqualified and all of the assets of the IRA may be deemed distributed and subjected to taxation. ERISA plan fiduciaries and IRA custodians should consult with counsel before making an investment in our common shares.
With respect to the annual valuation requirements described above, we have disclosed an estimated value per share of our common stock of $7.33. This estimated per-share value was calculated by aggregating the value of our real estate and other assets, subtracting the fair value of our liabilities, and dividing the total by the number of our common shares outstanding, all as of September 30, 2012. Therefore, our estimated share value is the same as our net asset value, as it does not reflect "enterprise value," or include a premium reflective of (i) the large size of our portfolio; (ii) our rights under our advisory agreement and our potential ability to secure the services of a management team on a long-term basis; or (iii) the potential increase in our share value if we were to list our shares on a national securities exchange.
As with any valuation methodology, our methodology is based upon a number of estimates and assumptions that may not be accurate or complete. Different parties with different assumptions and estimates could derive a different estimated per-share value.  Accordingly, with respect to our estimated per-share value, we can provide no assurance that (i) a stockholder would be able to realize this estimated value per share upon attempting to resell his or her shares; (ii) we would be able to achieve, for our stockholders, the estimated value per share, upon a listing of our shares of common stock on a national securities exchange, selling our real estate portfolio, or merging with another company; or (iii) the estimated share value, or the methodologies relied upon to estimate the share value, will be found by any regulatory authority to comply with Financial Industry Regulatory Authority ("FINRA"), ERISA, or any other regulatory requirements. Furthermore, the estimated value of our shares was calculated as of a particular point in time. The value of our shares will fluctuate over time in response to, among other things, changes in real estate market fundamentals, capital markets activities, and attributes specific to the properties and leases within our portfolio (for additional information, see Part II., Item 5, Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters, and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities).
If you invest in our shares through an IRA or other retirement plan, you may be limited in your ability to withdraw required minimum distributions.
If you establish an IRA or other retirement plan through which you invest in our shares, federal law may require you to withdraw required minimum distributions ("RMDs") from such plan in the future. Any share redemptions requested to satisfy these RMD requirements will be considered requests for "ordinary redemptions," as defined in our share redemption program. Our share redemption program limits the amount of ordinary redemptions that can be made in a given year. As a result, you may not be able to redeem your shares at a time in which you need liquidity to satisfy the RMD requirements under your IRA or other retirement plan. Even if you are able to redeem your shares, such redemptions will be at a price less than the price at which the shares were initially purchased. If you fail to withdraw RMDs from your IRA or other retirement plan, you may be subject to certain tax penalties.
ITEM 1B.
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
Not applicable.
ITEM 2.
PROPERTIES
Overview
As of December 31, 2012, we owned interests in 61 office properties and one hotel located in 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Moscow, Russia. Of these office properties, 60 are wholly owned and one is owned through a consolidated subsidiary. As of December 31, 2012, the office properties were approximately 92.9% leased.


Page 15


Property Statistics
The tables below include statistics for properties that we own directly as well as through our consolidated subsidiary. Annualized Lease Revenue is calculated by multiplying (i) rental payments (defined as base rent plus operating expense reimbursements, if payable by the tenant on a monthly basis under the terms of a lease that have been executed, but excluding (a) rental abatements and (b) rental payments related to executed but not commenced leases for space that was covered by an existing lease), by (ii) 12. In instances in which contractual rents or operating expense reimbursements are collected on an annual, semi-annual, or quarterly basis, such amounts are multiplied by a factor of 1, 2, or 4, respectively, to calculate the annualized figure. For leases that have been executed but not commenced relating to unleased space, Annualized Lease Revenue is calculated by multiplying (i) the monthly base rental payment (excluding abatements) plus any operating expense reimbursements for the initial month of the lease term by (ii) 12.
The following table shows lease expirations of our office properties as of December 31, 2012, and during each of the next 10 years and thereafter. This table assumes no exercise of renewal options or termination rights.    
Year of Lease Expiration
 
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
(in thousands)
 
Rentable
Square Feet
(in thousands)
 
Percentage of
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
Vacant
 
$

 
1,458

 
%
2013
 
27,187

 
885

 
5
%
2014
 
16,831

 
560

 
3
%
2015
 
35,284

 
1,007

 
7
%
2016
 
67,420

 
1,704

 
13
%
2017
 
103,822

 
3,815

 
19
%
2018
 
47,379

 
1,490

 
9
%
2019
 
22,826

 
1,081

 
4
%
2020
 
57,552

 
2,559

 
11
%
2021
 
29,804

 
913

 
6
%
2022
 
36,386

 
807

 
7
%
Thereafter
 
89,897

 
4,369

 
16
%
 
 
$
534,388

 
20,648

 
100
%
The following table shows the geographic diversification of our office properties as of December 31, 2012.
Location
 
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
(in thousands)
 
Rentable
Square Feet
(in thousands)
 
Percentage of
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
Atlanta
 
$
75,353

 
3,462

 
15
%
Washington, D.C.
 
57,524

 
857

 
11
%
Northern New Jersey
 
54,249

 
2,177

 
10
%
San Francisco
 
44,700

 
959

 
9
%
Baltimore
 
37,613

 
1,194

 
7
%
Cleveland
 
34,143

 
1,235

 
7
%
Houston
 
32,992

 
902

 
6
%
Chicago
 
29,419

 
1,336

 
6
%
New York
 
28,083

 
360

 
5
%
Boston
 
23,073

 
1,199

 
4
%
Pittsburgh
 
14,809

 
824

 
3
%
Other(1)
 
92,430

 
4,685

 
17
%
 
 
$
524,388

 
19,190

 
100
%
(1) 
No more than 2% is attributable to any individual geographic location.


Page 16


The following table shows the tenant industry diversification of our office properties as of December 31, 2012.
Industry
 
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
(in thousands)
 
Rentable
Square Feet
(in thousands)
 
Percentage of
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
Legal Services
 
$
77,310

 
1,436

 
15
%
Depository Institutions
 
72,883

 
2,393

 
14
%
Communications
 
50,357

 
2,566

 
10
%
Industrial Machinery & Equipment
 
38,844

 
1,681

 
7
%
Electric, Gas & Sanitary Services
 
36,980

 
1,880

 
7
%
Business Services
 
30,753

 
947

 
6
%
Security & Commodity Brokers
 
26,779

 
636

 
5
%
Engineering & Management
 
26,527

 
1,043

 
5
%
Insurance Carriers
 
17,280

 
815

 
3
%
Electronic & Other Electric Equipment
 
17,271

 
781

 
3
%
Transportation Equipment
 
13,752

 
448

 
3
%
Other(1)
 
115,652

 
4,564

 
22
%
 
 
$
524,388

 
19,190

 
100
%
(1) 
No more than 2% is attributable to any individual industry.
The following table shows the tenant diversification of our office properties as of December 31, 2012.
Tenant
 
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
(in thousands)
 
Percentage of
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
AT&T
 
$
47,629

 
9
%
Wells Fargo
 
29,297

 
6
%
Jones Day
 
27,135

 
5
%
IBM
 
24,954

 
5
%
Key Bank
 
19,110

 
4
%
PSEG Services
 
18,515

 
4
%
T Rowe Price
 
16,651

 
3
%
Pershing
 
16,323

 
3
%
Westinghouse
 
14,809

 
3
%
Other(1)
 
309,965

 
58
%
 
 
$
524,388

 
100
%
(1) 
No more than 2% is attributable to any individual tenant.
The following table shows certain information related to significant properties as of December 31, 2012.
Property
 
Location
 
Rentable Square Feet
(in thousands)
 
Total Real Estate, Net
(in thousands)
 
% of Total Assets
 
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
(in thousands)
 
Average Annualized Lease Revenue per Square Foot
 
Occupancy
Market Square Buildings
 
Washington, DC
 
684

 
$
574,009

 
12.4
%
 
$
47,031

 
$
68.8

 
92.6
%


Page 17


Other Property-Specific Information
Certain of our properties are subject to ground leases and held as collateral for debt. Refer to Schedule III listed in the index of Item 15(a) of this report, which details such properties as of December 31, 2012.
ITEM 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
From time to time, we are party to legal proceedings, which arise in the ordinary course of our business. We are not currently involved in any legal proceedings of which the outcome is reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition, nor are we aware of any such legal proceedings contemplated by governmental authorities.
ITEM 4.
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.


Page 18


PART II
ITEM 5.
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS, AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Market Information
As of January 31, 2013, we had approximately 545.6 million shares of common stock outstanding held of record by a total of 126,901 stockholders. The number of stockholders is based on the records of DST Systems Inc., who serves as our registrar and transfer agent. There is no established public trading market for our common stock. Under our charter, certain restrictions are imposed on the ownership and transfer of shares.
To assist FINRA members who participated in our public offerings of common stock, we disclose in each annual report distributed to stockholders a per-share estimated value of our common stock, the method by which it was developed, and the date of the data used to develop the estimated value. In addition, our advisor prepares annual statements of estimated share values to assist both fiduciaries of retirement plans subject to the annual reporting requirements of ERISA and custodians of IRAs in the preparation of their reports relating to an investment in our shares. For these purposes, our estimated value of a share of our common stock was $7.33 per share as of September 30, 2012.
Estimated Per-Share Value Valuation Methodology
Summary:
As we did in 2011, we engaged Altus Group U.S., Inc. ("Altus"), a third-party commercial real estate valuation firm, to appraise our assets, both real estate and other assets, to estimate the fair value of our liabilities, and to use those estimates to calculate an estimated fair value of our shares as of September 30, 2012. The engagement of Altus was approved by the asset management committee of our board of directors, which committee was composed only of independent directors. Altus's analyses, opinions, and conclusions were developed in conformity with the Code of Professional Ethics and the Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice of the Appraisal Institute and in conformity with the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice. Altus appraised each of our real estate assets individually, and the asset management committee of our board and our then advisor reviewed these analyses and conclusions.
Altus worked with our advisor and the asset management committee of our board of directors to gather information regarding our assets and liabilities. On October 29, 2012, Altus delivered a final report to our advisor, who shared the report with the asset management committee of our board of directors. At a subsequent meeting of our board of directors, our advisor presented the report and recommended an estimated per-share value. Our board of directors considered all information provided in light of its own extensive familiarity with our assets and, upon the recommendation of our asset management committee, unanimously agreed upon an estimated value of $7.33 per share, which is consistent with both the advisor's recommendation and Altus's estimate.
Our estimated per-share value of $7.33 as of September 30, 2012 reflects a decline from our previous estimated per-share value of $7.47 as of September 30, 2011, primarily due to changes in the leasing expectations and renewal probabilities for some of the assets in our portfolio. Proactive leasing has been a focal point of our operational strategy in 2012, and has yielded more than 2.4 million square feet of new and extended leases (approximately 10% of our portfolio) during the first nine months of the year. This activity has improved our average remaining lease term from 6.3 years to 6.7 years; however, current economic conditions in certain markets have required us to offer additional tenant incentives and, in some cases, accept space contractions as conditions of the new lease contracts. The associated leasing capital has been, and is expected to continue to be, funded with a combination of cash and debt.
Consistent with the methodology used when we estimated our per-share value as of September 30, 2011, our estimated per-share value as of September 30, 2012 was calculated by aggregating the value of our real estate and other assets, subtracting the fair value of our liabilities, and dividing the total by the number of our common shares outstanding, all as of September 30, 2012. The potential dilutive effect of our common stock equivalents does not impact our estimated per-share value. Our estimated per-share value is the same as our net asset value. It does not reflect "enterprise value," which includes a premium for:
the large size of our portfolio, although it may be true that some buyers are willing to pay more for a large portfolio than they are willing to pay for each property in the portfolio separately;
our rights under our advisory agreement as of September 30, 2012, and our potential ability to secure the services of a management team on a long-term basis; or
the potential increase in our share value if we were to list our shares on a national securities exchange.


Page 19


Our key objectives are to arrive at an estimated per-share value that is supported by methodologies and assumptions that are appropriate based on our current circumstances and calculated using processes and procedures that may be repeated in future periods. We believe that this approach reflects the conservative investment principles that guided the assembly of our portfolio over the past eight years, and comports with industry-standard valuation methodologies used for nontraded real estate companies. We plan to continue to update our estimated per-share value on an annual basis.
Details:
As of September 30, 2012, our estimated per-share value was calculated as follows:
Real estate assets
$
10.00

(1)
Debt
(2.68
)
(2)
Other
0.01

(3)
Estimated net asset value per share
$
7.33

 
Estimated enterprise value premium
None assumed

 
Total estimated per-share value
$
7.33

 
(1) 
Our real estate assets were appraised using valuation methods that we believe are typically used by investors for properties that are similar to ours, including capitalization of the net property operating income, 10-year discounted cash flow models, and comparison with sales of similar properties. Primary emphasis was placed on the discounted cash flow analysis, with the other approaches used to confirm the reasonableness of the value conclusion. Using this methodology, the appraised value of the real estate assets we owned as of September 30, 2012 reflects an overall decline of 8.6% from original purchase price, exclusive of acquisition costs, and post-acquisition capital investments. We believe that the assumptions employed in the valuation are within the ranges used for properties that are similar to ours and held by investors with similar expectations to our investors.
The following are the key assumptions (shown on a weighted-average basis) that are used in the discounted cash flow models to estimate the value of our real estate assets:
Exit capitalization rate
7.11
%
Discount rate/internal rate of return ("IRR")
8.02
%
Annual market rent growth rate
3.21
%
Annual holding period
10.03 years

While we believe our assumptions are reasonable, a change in these assumptions would impact the calculation of the value of our real estate assets. For example, assuming all other factors remain unchanged, a change in the weighted-average annual discount rate/IRR of 0.25% would yield a change in our total real estate asset value of 1.9%.
(2) 
The fair value of our debt instruments was estimated using discounted cash flow models, which incorporate assumptions that we believe reflect the terms currently available on similar borrowing arrangements to borrowers with credit profiles similar to ours.
(3) 
The fair value of our non-real-estate assets and liabilities is estimated to reflect book value given their typically short-term (less than one year) settlement periods.
Limitations and Risks:
As with any valuation methodology, our methodology is based upon a number of estimates and assumptions that may not be accurate or complete (see footnotes in above Details section). Different parties with different assumptions and estimates could derive a different estimated per-share value. Accordingly, with respect to our estimated per-share value, we can provide no assurance that:
a stockholder would be able to realize this estimated per-share value upon attempting to resell his or her shares;
we would be able to achieve, for our stockholders, the estimated per-share value, upon a listing of our shares of common stock on a national securities exchange, selling our real estate portfolio, or merging with another company; or
the estimated per-share value, or the methodologies relied upon to estimate the per-share value, will be found by any regulatory authority to comply with FINRA, ERISA, or any other regulatory requirements.


Page 20


Furthermore, the estimated value of our shares was calculated as of a particular point in time. The value of our shares will fluctuate over time in response to, among other things, changes in real estate market fundamentals, capital markets activities, and attributes specific to the properties and leases within our portfolio.
Distributions
We intend to make distributions each taxable year (not including a return of capital for federal income tax purposes) equal to at least 90% of our taxable income. One of our primary goals is to pay regular quarterly distributions to our stockholders. The amount of distributions paid and the taxable portion in prior periods are not necessarily indicative of amounts anticipated in future periods.
When evaluating the amount of cash available to fund distributions to stockholders, we consider net cash provided by operating activities (as defined by Generally Accepted Accounting Principles ("GAAP") and presented in the accompanying GAAP-basis consolidated statements of cash flows), adjusted to exclude certain costs that were incurred for the purpose of generating future earnings and appreciation in value over the long term, including acquisition-related costs. Borrowings are used to pay distributions to the extent that distributions exceed current-period and prior-period accumulated operating cash flow.
Quarterly distributions paid to the stockholders during 2012 and 2011 were as follows (in thousands, except per-share amounts):
 
2012
 
 
First Quarter
 
Second Quarter
 
Third Quarter
 
Fourth Quarter
 
Total
 
Total Cash Distributed
$
67,954

 
$
68,030

 
$
68,157

 
$
51,879

 
$
256,020

 
Per-Share Investment Income
$
0.020

 
$
0.020

 
$
0.020

 
$
0.015

 
$
0.075

(1) 
Per-Share Return of Capital
$
0.105

 
$
0.105

 
$
0.105

 
$
0.080

 
$
0.395

(2) 
Total Per-Share Distribution
$
0.125

 
$
0.125

 
$
0.125

 
$
0.095

 
$
0.470

 
 
2011
 
 
First Quarter
 
Second Quarter
 
Third Quarter
 
Fourth Quarter
 
Total
 
Total Cash Distributed
$
67,485

 
$
67,615

 
$
67,771

 
$
67,849

 
$
270,720

 
Per-Share Investment Income
$
0.049

 
$
0.049

 
$
0.049

 
$
0.049

 
$
0.196

(1) 
Per-Share Return of Capital
$
0.076

 
$
0.076

 
$
0.076

 
$
0.076

 
$
0.304

(2) 
Total Per-Share Distribution
$
0.125

 
$
0.125

 
$
0.125

 
$
0.125

 
$
0.500

 
(1)  
Approximately 16% and 39% of the distributions paid during 2012 and 2011, respectively, were taxable to the investor as ordinary income.
(2) 
Approximately 84% and 61% of the distributions paid during 2012 and 2011, respectively, were characterized as a tax-deferred return of capital.
For the first three quarters of 2012, quarterly stockholder distributions were declared and paid at $0.125 per share, consistent with the rate paid throughout 2011. In the fourth quarter of 2012, our board of directors elected to reduce the quarterly stockholder distribution rate to $0.095 per share. Economic downturns in certain of our geographic markets and in certain industries in which our tenants operate have impacted our recent leasing activities and caused our current and future operating cash flows to experience some deterioration. In 2012, we renewed leases for 9.2% of our portfolio, based on square footage, which resulted in tenant concessions of $49.7 million. Furthermore, in preparing for various liquidity options, our board has decided to adjust our distribution payment policy to reserve additional operating cash flow to fund capital expenditures for our existing portfolio and to provide additional financial flexibility as we begin to shape our portfolio through the strategic sale and redeployment of capital proceeds in furtherance of our investment objectives, which include concentrating our market focus. Our board of directors elected to maintain the distribution rate of $0.095 for the first quarter of 2013. Stockholder distributions for the first quarter of 2013 will be paid to common stockholders of record as of March 15, 2013 in March 2013. We are continuing to monitor our cash flows and market conditions and to assess their impact on our future earnings and future distribution decisions.
Redemptions of Common Stock
We maintain an SRP that allows stockholders who acquired their shares directly from Columbia Property Trust to redeem their shares, subject to certain conditions and limitations as described in the SRP.


Page 21


We limit the dollar value and number of shares that may be redeemed under the SRP as follows:
First, we will limit requests for all redemptions (other than those sought within two years of a stockholder's death) on a pro rata basis so that the aggregate of such redemptions during any calendar year will not exceed 5.0% of the weighted-average number of shares outstanding in the prior calendar year. Requests precluded by this test will not be considered in the test below.
In addition, if necessary, we will limit all redemption requests, including those sought within two years of a stockholder's death, on a pro rata basis so that the aggregate of such redemptions during any calendar year would not exceed the greater of 100% of the net proceeds from our DRP during the calendar year, or 5.0% of the weighted-average number of shares outstanding in the prior calendar year.
Effective November 8, 2012, the price paid for shares redeemed under the SRP in cases of death, "qualifying disability," or qualification for federal assistance for confinement to a "long-term care facility" changed from $7.47, our estimated per-share value as of September 30, 2011, to $7.33, our estimated per-share value as of September 30, 2012 (see Market Information section above). Effective December 12, 2011, the price paid for Ordinary Redemptions (as defined in the SRP) was set at $6.25 per share. During 2012, we received eligible redemption requests for 15.1 million shares, all of which were redeemed. Redemption requests were funded with DRP proceeds.
All of the shares that we redeemed pursuant to our SRP program during the quarter ended December 31, 2012 are provided below (in thousands, except per-share amounts):
Period
 
Total
Number
of Shares
Purchased(1)
 
Average Price
Paid per Share
 
Total Number of
Shares Purchased as
Part of Publicly
Announced Plans
or Programs(2)
 
Approximate Dollar
Value of  Shares
Available That
May Yet Be
Redeemed Under
the Program
October 2012
 
1,405

 
$
6.64

 
1,405

 
(3) 
November 2012
 
1,524

 
$
6.56

 
1,524

 
(3) 
December 2012
 
1,569

 
$
6.49

 
1,569

 
(3) 
(1) 
All purchases of our equity securities by us in 2012 were made pursuant to our SRP.
(2) 
We announced the commencement of the program on December 10, 2003, and amendments to the program on April 22, 2004; March 28, 2006; May 11, 2006; August 10, 2006; August 8, 2007; November 13, 2008; March 31, 2009; August 13, 2009; February 18, 2010; July 21, 2010; September 23, 2010; July 19, 2011; August 12, 2011; December 12, 2011; and February 28, 2013.
(3) 
We currently limit the dollar value of shares that may be redeemed under the program as described above.
Unregistered Issuance of Securities
During 2012, we did not issue any securities that were not registered under the Securities Act of 1933.
Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans
We have reserved 750,000 shares of common stock for issuance under our Stock Option Plan and 100,000 shares of common stock under the Independent Director Stock Option Plan. Both plans were approved by our stockholders in 2003, before we commenced our initial public offering. The following table provides summary information about securities issuable under our equity compensation plans.
Plan category
 
Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants, and rights
 
Weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants, and rights
 
Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans(1)
Equity compensation plans
  approved by security holders
 
29,500

 
$
12.00

 
820,500

Equity compensation plans not
  approved by security holders
 

 

 

Total
 
29,500

 
$
12.00

 
820,500

(1) 
Includes 70,500 shares reserved for issuance under the Independent Director Stock Option Plan.


Page 22


ITEM 6.
SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
The following selected financial data for 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, and 2008 should be read in conjunction with the accompanying consolidated financial statements and related notes in Item 8 hereof (amounts in thousands, except per-share data).
 
 
As of December 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
Total assets
 
$
5,730,949

 
$
5,776,567

 
$
5,371,685

 
$
5,374,064

 
$
5,474,774

Total stockholders' equity
 
$
3,163,980

 
$
3,346,655

 
$
3,455,697

 
$
2,718,087

 
$
2,576,783

Outstanding debt
 
$
1,650,296

 
$
1,469,486

 
$
886,939

 
$
946,936

 
$
1,268,522

Outstanding long-term debt
 
$
1,621,541

 
$
1,433,295

 
$
838,556

 
$
812,030

 
$
865,938

Obligations under capital leases
 
$
586,000

 
$
646,000

 
$
646,000

 
$
664,000

 
$
664,000

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
 
2008
Total revenues(1)
 
$
576,691

 
$
576,389

 
$
510,514

 
$
506,890

 
$
470,665

Net income (loss) attributable to the
  common stockholders of Columbia Property Trust, Inc.
 
$
48,039

 
$
56,642

 
$
23,266

 
$
40,594

 
$
(22,678
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net cash provided by operating activities
 
$
252,839

 
$
279,158

 
$
270,106

 
$
248,527

 
$
258,854

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
 
$
31,047

 
$
(666,090
)
 
$
(312,708
)
 
$
(129,678
)
 
$
(915,315
)
Net cash (used in) provided by financing
  activities
 
$
(269,729
)
 
$
387,610

 
$
(20,429
)
 
$
(102,745
)
 
$
694,933

Distributions paid
 
$
256,020

 
$
270,720

 
$
313,815

 
$
279,325

 
$
242,367

Net proceeds raised through issuance of our
  common stock(2)
 
$
118,388

 
$
130,289

 
$
483,559

 
$
657,563

 
$
821,609

Net debt (repayments) proceeds(2)
 
$
(28,191
)
 
$
375,222

 
$
(74,742
)
 
$
(335,483
)
 
$
310,633

Investments in real estate(2)
 
$
233,798

 
$
638,783

 
$
318,948

 
$
124,149

 
$
900,269

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Per weighted-average common share data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income (loss) – basic and diluted
 
$
0.09

 
$
0.10

 
$
0.04

 
$
0.09

 
$
(0.06
)
Distributions declared
 
$
0.47

 
$
0.50

 
$
0.57

(3) 
$
0.60

 
$
0.60

Weighted-average common shares outstanding
 
546,688

 
542,721

 
524,848

 
467,922

 
407,051

(1) 
Prior-period amounts adjusted to conform with current-period presentation, including classifying revenues generated by properties held for sale and by properties sold, as discontinued operations for all periods presented (see Note 12, Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations, to the accompanying consolidating financial statements).
(2) 
Activity is presented on a cash basis. Please refer to our accompanying consolidated statements of cash flows.
(3) 
Consistent with 2008 and 2009, we paid total stockholder distributions of $0.60 per weighted-average share in 2010. The difference between the distributions declared per weighted-average common share for 2010, as compared with distributions declared for the previous periods presented, relates to a change in the timing of distribution declarations and payments made in the fourth quarter of 2010.


Page 23


ITEM 7.
MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the Selected Financial Data in Item 6 above and our accompanying consolidated financial statements and notes thereto. See also Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements preceding Part I.
Overview
From 2004 through 2010, we raised approximately $5.8 billion in gross equity proceeds and, along with borrowings, invested those proceeds, net of fees, into commercial real estate consisting of high-quality, income-producing office and industrial properties leased to creditworthy entities located in major metropolitan areas throughout the United States. 
Following our initial growth period, we have concentrated on actively managing our assets and pursuing a variety of strategic opportunities focused on enhancing the composition of our portfolio and the total return potential for the REIT. In early 2012, we consummated a series of favorable debt transactions, which have allowed us to improve our secured-to-unsecured debt mix and to lower our total cost of borrowings without disrupting the laddering of our debt maturities or materially altering our aggregate borrowing levels. More recently, we have improved our market concentration through disposition and acquisition activities. In December 2012, we closed on the disposition of nine properties located in less desirable markets for $260.5 million, excluding closing costs (the "Nine Property Sale"). As a result of changing our disposition strategy and shortening our anticipated holding period for these assets, we recorded an impairment loss of $18.5 million on one of the properties in the Nine Property Sale, the 180 E 100 South property located in Salt Lake City, Utah, in the third quarter of 2012. After recording the $18.5 million impairment loss in the third quarter, the Nine Property Sale yielded a net gain of $3.2 million upon closing in the fourth quarter of 2012.  Also in December 2012, we purchased the 333 Market Street Building, located in San Francisco, California, for $395.3 million in cash and assumed debt.
In connection with preparing for various liquidity options, we established and have carried out a plan to transition our externally advised management platform to a self-managed structure, which culminated on February 28, 2013, upon terminating the advisory and property management agreements and acquiring WREAS II and WRES, including the employees necessary to perform the requisite corporate and property management functions. Looking ahead, we will continue to prepare for liquidity options in 2013 by, among other things, further refining our portfolio in an effort to enhance the REIT's value potential and, consequently, its attractiveness to future investors. Our goal is to optimize the allocation between our traditional, stabilized core investments, and growth-oriented, core-plus and value-added investments, which have an expectation for meaningful upside potential in net operating income and value over the intermediate term. We will also continue to focus on our market concentration by building on our economic presence in key markets.
General Economic Conditions and Real Estate Market Commentary
Management reviews a number of economic forecasts and market commentaries in order to evaluate general economic conditions and to formulate a view of the current environment's effect on the real estate markets in which we operate.
As measured by the U.S. Real Gross Domestic Product ("real GDP"), the U.S. economy decreased at an annual rate of 0.1% in the fourth quarter of 2012 as compared with an increase of 3.1% in the third quarter of 2012. For the full year of 2012, real GDP increased by 2.2% compared with an increase of 1.8% in 2011. The increase in real GDP in 2012 primarily reflected positive contributions from personal consumption expenditures, nonresidential fixed investment, exports, residential fixed investment, and private inventory investment that were partly offset by negative contributions from federal government spending and from state and local government spending. While management believes the U.S. economy is likely to continue its recovery, we believe the recovery will maintain a moderate pace, with fiscal policy presenting the biggest wildcard in the outlook. Given the ongoing uncertainty surrounding the debt ceiling, the U.S. economy is expected to start 2013 on a slow pace. Real GDP is projected to hover below 2% in the first half of the year, and business growth is expected to remain below potential. But assuming lawmakers can strike a deal on the debt ceiling, or at least provide a framework by mid-year, the U.S. economy is expected to accelerate in the second half, with real GDP averaging closer to a 3% growth rate.
Real estate market fundamentals underlying the U.S. office markets saw modest improvements in the major indicators in 2012. The U.S. office market ended the fourth quarter 2012 with a vacancy rate of 12.5%, an improvement from a 13.0% vacancy rate at the end of 2011. During the fourth quarter of 2012, demand for office space strengthened despite the uncertainty surrounding the fiscal cliff. Net absorption was 20 million square feet in the fourth quarter, which is its highest level since the third quarter of 2007. However, annual absorption is 20% below the long-term trend. Sixty-six of the 80 metro areas tracked (82%) reported positive absorption. Of the total net absorption in 2012, two-thirds was in Class-A space, which is above its 35% share of the office stock, indicating a flight to quality by tenants. Most major markets had year-over-year gains in both net absorption and office jobs, indicating a broad level of recovery. Net absorption is expected to average 10 million square feet to 25 million square feet per


Page 24


quarter through 2017. The average quoted rental rates of the total office market saw a slight increase from $22.95 per square foot in the fourth quarter of 2011 to $23.12 per square foot in the fourth quarter of 2012. Early 2013 economic indicators are suggesting another year of at least modest growth.
Transaction activity for the fourth quarter of 2012 was the highest seen in any quarter since the end of 2007 with a volume of $29.1 billion. Sellers motivated to close deals prior to the rise in taxes contributed to the increase, but office prices increased over the quarter, and cap rates declined slightly indicating that buyers were perhaps even more motivated. The year-end surge in closings contributed to a 2012 total volume of $77.6 billion, a 19% increase from 2011. A shift in momentum from trophy central business district towers to suburban properties and secondary markets began in 2012. Non-Major Metros saw a volume increase of over 40%, which is more than double the national average. Additionally, cap rates in secondary markets have started to decline with a sharp decrease observed in Q4. Overall, average cap rates decreased from 7.6% in October to 7.4% in November.
Despite elevated unemployment and below-average consumer confidence in the overall economy, office job growth is projected to range between 1% and 3% through 2017. With this projected job growth, future years should see solid office net absorption rates. With the expected decline in office vacancy rates nationally, rent growth is projected to expand to more markets in 2013 and more significantly in 2014. Office market rents are expected to have more upside than other property types, with a cumulative increase of 30% expected by 2017. Due to low vacancy levels and little to no new product, many of the more supply-strained metros should see the strongest growth by 2017. These include New York, Boston, Denver, and Orange County, California. Tech-exposed markets should also have strong rent growth due to above-average demand prospects. Examples of these markets include San Jose and San Francisco.
Impact of Economic Conditions on our Portfolio
We believe that the strength of our portfolio positions us favorably compared with many real estate owners during these challenging market conditions. As of December 31, 2012, our portfolio had a debt-to-real-estate-asset ratio of approximately 28.6%, which is lower than average for our industry. We believe that low leverage, coupled with ample borrowing capacity under our unsecured revolving credit facility ($460.0 million available as of February 15, 2013), provides considerable financial flexibility, which enables us to respond quickly to unanticipated funding needs and opportunities. Further, the majority of our borrowings are in the form of effectively fixed-rate financings, which helps to insulate the portfolio from interest rate risk. Diversifying our portfolio by tenant, tenant industry, geography, and lease expiration date also reduces our exposure to any one market determinant. As of December 31, 2012, our portfolio was 92.9% leased in two countries, 19 states, plus Washington, D.C., and 26 metropolitan statistical areas. Although we believe that our portfolio is well-positioned to weather current market conditions, we are not immune to the effects of another downturn in the economy, weak real estate fundamentals, or disruption in the credit markets. If these conditions return, they would likely affect the value of our portfolio, our results of operations, and our liquidity.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Overview
In 2011 and 2012, we actively managed our real estate portfolio with an emphasis on leasing and re-leasing space, and pursuing and closing on strategic acquisitions and selective dispositions to concentrate our market focus. During this period, we also enhanced our capital structure by continuing to raise net equity proceeds through our DRP, improving the composition, maturities and capacity of our debt portfolio while lowering our overall borrowing costs, accessing new sources of capital, and identifying additional sources of future capital.
In determining how and when to allocate cash resources, we initially consider the source of the cash. We reserve a portion of operating cash flows to fund capital expenditures for our existing portfolio. The amount of distributions that we pay to our common stockholders is determined by our board of directors and is dependent upon a number of factors, including the funds available for distribution to common stockholders, our financial condition, our capital expenditure requirements, our expectations of future sources of liquidity, and the annual distribution requirements necessary to maintain our status as a REIT under the Code. When evaluating funds available for stockholder distributions, we consider net cash provided by operating activities, as presented in the accompanying GAAP-basis consolidated statements of cash flows, adjusted to exclude certain costs that were incurred for the purpose of generating future earnings and appreciation in value over the long term, including acquisition fees and expenses. We use DRP proceeds to fund share redemptions (subject to the limitations of our share redemption program), and make residual DRP proceeds available to fund capital improvements for our existing portfolio, additional real estate investments, and other cash needs.
Short-term Liquidity and Capital Resources
During 2012, we generated net cash flows from operating activities of $252.8 million, which consists primarily of receipts from tenants for rent and reimbursements, reduced by payments for operating costs, administrative expenses, and interest expense. During the same period, we paid total distributions to stockholders of $256.0 million, which includes $118.4 million reinvested


Page 25


in our common stock pursuant to our DRP. We expect to use the majority of our future net cash flows from operating activities to fund capital expenditures and distributions to stockholders.
In 2012, we sold 11 properties for net proceeds of $304.3 million and used these proceeds to acquire the 333 Market Street Building in San Francisco, California, which entailed a cash payment of $188.8 million and an assumed mortgage note of $206.5 million, and to fund net debt repayments of $28.2 million. In 2012, we also raised net equity proceeds of $118.4 million from the sale of our common stock under the DRP and used those proceeds to fund share redemptions of $99.4 million. Along with cash on hand, residual proceeds from the sale of properties and from the sale of common stock under our DRP were used to fund capital expenditures incurred in connection with leasing and maintaining the properties in our portfolio.
We believe that we have adequate liquidity and capital resources to meet our current obligations as they come due. As of February 15, 2013, we had access to the borrowing capacity under the JPMorgan Chase Credit Facility of $460.0 million.
Long-term Liquidity and Capital Resources
Over the long term, we expect that our primary sources of capital will include operating cash flows, proceeds from our DRP, proceeds from secured or unsecured borrowings from third-party lenders, and, if and when deemed appropriate, proceeds from strategic property sales. We expect that our primary uses of capital will continue to include stockholder distributions; redemptions of shares of our common stock under our share redemption program; capital expenditures, such as building improvements, tenant improvements, and leasing costs; repaying or refinancing debt; and selective property acquisitions, either directly or through investments in joint ventures. Over the next five years, we anticipate funding capital expenditures necessary for our properties, including building improvements, tenant improvements, and leasing commissions, of approximately $424.1 million.
Consistent with our financing objectives and operational strategy, we expect to continue to maintain low debt levels (historically less than 40% of the cost of our assets) over the long term. This conservative leverage goal could reduce the amount of current income we can generate for our stockholders, but it also reduces their risk of loss. We believe that preserving investor capital while generating stable current income is in the best interest of our stockholders. As of December 31, 2012, our debt-to-real-estate-asset ratio (calculated on a cost basis) was approximately 28.6%.
For the first three quarters of 2012, quarterly stockholder distributions were declared and paid at $0.125 per share, consistent with the rate paid throughout 2011. In the fourth quarter of 2012, our board of directors elected to reduce the quarterly stockholder distribution rate to $0.095 per share. Economic downturns in certain of our geographic markets and in certain industries in which our tenants operate have impacted our recent leasing activities and caused our current and future operating cash flows to experience some deterioration. In 2012, we renewed leases for 9.2% of our portfolio, based on square footage, which resulted in tenant concessions of $49.7 million. Furthermore, in preparing for various liquidity options, our board has decided to adjust our distribution payment policy to reserve additional operating cash flow to fund capital expenditures for our existing portfolio and to provide additional financial flexibility as we begin to shape our portfolio through the strategic sale and redeployment of capital proceeds in furtherance of our investment objectives, which include concentrating our market focus. Our board of directors elected to maintain the distribution rate of $0.095 for the first quarter of 2013. Stockholder distributions for the first quarter of 2013 will be paid in March to common stockholders of record as of March 15, 2013. We are continuing to monitor our cash flows and market conditions and to assess their impact on our future earnings and future distribution decisions.


Page 26


Debt Covenants  
Our portfolio debt instruments, the $450 Million Term Loan, the JPMorgan Chase Credit Facility, and the unsecured senior notes, contain certain covenants and restrictions that require us to meet certain financial ratios, including the following key financial covenants and respective covenant levels as of December 31, 2012:
 
 
 
 
Actual Performance
 
Covenant Level
 
December 31, 2012
JP Morgan Chase Credit Facility and $450 Million Term Loan
 
 
 
Total debt to total asset value ratio
Less than 50%
 
34%
Secured debt to total asset value ratio
Less than 40% 
 
19%
Fixed charge coverage ratio
Greater than 1.75x
 
3.76x
Unencumbered interest coverage ratio
Greater than 2.0x
 
5.01x
Unencumbered asset coverage ratio
Greater than 2.0x
 
2.73x
Unsecured Senior Notes due 2018:
 
 
 
Aggregate debt test
Less than 60%
 
28%
Debt service test
Greater than 1.5x
 
4.19x
Secured debt test
Less than 40%
 
15%
Maintenance of total unencumbered assets
Greater than 150%
 
563%
We were in compliance with all of our debt covenants as of December 31, 2012. Currently, we expect to continue to meet the requirements of our debt covenants over the short- and long-term.
Contractual Commitments and Contingencies
As of December 31, 2012, our contractual obligations will become payable in the following periods (in thousands):
Contractual Obligations
 
Total
 
2013
 
2014-2015
 
2016-2017
 
Thereafter
Debt obligations
 
$
1,650,068

 
$
28,755

 
$
353,036

 
$
670,102

 
$
598,175

Interest obligations on debt(1)
 
387,193

 
74,127

 
134,069

 
82,721

 
96,276

Capital lease obligations(2)
 
586,000

 
466,000

 

 

 
120,000

Operating lease obligations
 
224,775

 
2,633

 
5,266

 
5,412

 
211,464

Total
 
$
2,848,036

 
$
571,515

 
$
492,371

 
$
758,235

 
$
1,025,915

(1) 
Interest obligations on variable-rate debt are measured at the rate at which they are effectively fixed with interest rate swap agreements (where applicable), a portion of which is reflected as Loss on interest rate swaps in our consolidated statements of operations of the accompanying consolidated financial statements. Interest obligations on all other debt are measured at the contractual rate. See Item 7A, Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk, for more information regarding our interest rate swaps.
(2) 
Amounts include principal obligations only. We made interest payments on these obligations of $39.8 million during 2012, all of which was funded with interest income earned on the corresponding investments in development authority bonds.
Results of Operations
Overview
As of December 31, 2012, we owned controlling interests in 61 office properties, which were approximately 92.9% leased, and one hotel. Our real estate operating results have increased in 2012, as compared with 2011, primarily due to a reduction in amortization expense incurred as leases in place at our properties at the time of acquisition reached maturity. In the near-term, we expect future real estate operating income to fluctuate, primarily based on acquisitions, dispositions, and leasing activities for our current portfolio.


Page 27


Comparison of the year ended December 31, 2012 versus the year ended December 31, 2011
Continuing Operations
Rental income remained stable at $442.3 million for 2012, as compared with $441.9 million for 2011. Absent changes to our portfolio or the leases currently in place at our properties, rental income is expected to remain at similar levels in future periods.
Tenant reimbursements remained stable at $104.9 million for 2012, as compared with $102.9 million for 2011, as additional reimbursements from the Market Square Buildings were offset by fewer reimbursements for the remainder of the portfolio, primarily due to concessions offered with new and modified leases executed in 2011 and 2012. Property operating costs were $173.5 million for 2012, which represents an increase as compared with $167.4 million for 2011, primarily due to the acquisition of the Market Square Buildings in March 2011 and the commencement of new leases in 2011 and 2012. Absent changes to our portfolio or the leases currently in place at our properties, future tenant reimbursement fluctuations are generally expected to correspond with future property operating cost reimbursements.
Hotel income, net of hotel operating costs, was $4.7 million for 2012, which represents an increase from $3.2 million for 2011, due to increased room rates and hotel occupancy, primarily in the second and third quarters of 2012. Hotel income and hotel operating costs are primarily driven by the local economic conditions and, as a result, are expected to fluctuate in the future, primarily based on changes in the supply of, and demand for, hotel and banquet space in Cleveland, Ohio, similar to that offered by the Key Center Marriott hotel.
Other property income was $6.5 million for 2012, which represents a decrease from $10.9 million for 2011, due to a decrease in lease cancellation activity. Future other property income fluctuations are expected to relate primarily to future lease restructuring and termination activities.
Asset and property management fees were $37.2 million for 2012, which represents a slight decrease from $37.4 million for 2011 due to contractual changes in the terms of the advisory agreements. Monthly asset management fees were capped at $2.7 million (or $32.5 million annualized) from April 2011 until June 2012. From July 2012 through December 2012, the cap on monthly asset management fees was reduced by $83,333, to approximately $2.6 million per month. For January and February 2013, asset management fees decreased by an additional $83,333 per month. Effective February 28, 2013, the advisory agreement was terminated in connection with acquiring WREAS II. Thus, going forward, no asset management fees will be incurred, as such services will be performed by employees of Columbia Property Trust. (See Note 10, Related Party Transactions and Agreements, of the accompanying consolidated financial statements for additional details.)
Depreciation was $114.1 million for 2012, which represents a slight increase from $110.7 million for 2011, primarily due to the acquisition of the Market Square Buildings in March 2011. Excluding the impact of acquisitions, dispositions, and changes to the leases currently in place at our properties, depreciation is expected to continue to increase in future periods, as compared to historical periods, due to ongoing capital improvements to our properties.
Amortization was $97.6 million for 2012, which represents a decrease from $111.5 million for 2011, primarily due to the expiration of in-place leases at our properties in 2011 and 2012. Future amortization is expected to fluctuate, primarily based on the expiration of additional in-place leases, offset by amortization of deferred lease costs incurred in connection with recent leasing activity and in-place leases at acquired properties.
General and administrative expenses were $25.2 million for 2012, which represents a slight increase from $23.7 million for 2011, due to fees paid under the Transition Services Agreement effective July 1, 2012, as described in Note 10, Related-Party Transactions and Agreements, of the accompanying consolidated financial statements. General and administrative expenses are expected to increase in the near-term as we incur fees under the consulting agreement described in Note 10, Related-Party Transactions and Agreements, of the accompanying consolidated financial statements.
Acquisition fees and expenses were $1.9 million for 2012, which represents a decrease from $11.3 million for 2011. 2012 acquisition fees and expenses are attributable to the 333 Market Street acquisition in San Francisco, California. 2011 acquisition fees and expenses include expenses related to the Market Square Buildings in Washington, D.C., and fees charged as a percentage of equity proceeds under the advisory agreement in place through July 2011, which fees have been discontinued. We expect future acquisition fees and expenses to fluctuate based on future acquisition activity.
Interest expense remained stable at $106.4 million for 2012, as compared with $106.3 million for 2011. Future interest expense is expected to increase due to the 333 Market Street Building mortgage note assumed at acquisition in December 2012.
Interest and other income was $39.9 million for 2012, which represents a decrease from $42.4 million for 2011, primarily due to the settlement of litigation in 2011, related to a prospective acquisition that did not close. Interest income is expected to remain


Page 28


relatively consistent in future periods given that the majority of this activity consists of interest income earned on investments in development authority bonds, which had a weighted-average remaining term of approximately 2.9 years as of December 31, 2012. Interest income earned on investments in development authority bonds is entirely offset by interest expense incurred on the corresponding capital leases.
We recognized a loss on interest rate swaps that does not qualify for hedge accounting treatment of approximately $1.2 million for 2012, as compared with $38.4 million for 2011, primarily due to writing off $15.1 million of cumulative unrealized market value adjustments on the interest rate swap on the 80 Park Plaza Building mortgage note upon settling of this swap contract in December 2011, prior to maturity. We anticipate future gains and losses on interest rate swaps that do not qualify for hedge accounting treatment will fluctuate, primarily due to changes in the estimated fair value of our interest rate swaps relative to then-current market conditions. Market value adjustments to swaps that qualify for hedge accounting treatment are recorded directly to equity, and therefore do not impact net income.
We recognized a gain on early extinguishment of debt of $53.0 million for 2011 in connection with settling the 222 East 41st Street Building mortgage note and the 80 Park Place Building mortgage note and their related swaps in December 2011, which is partially offset by the $15.1 million write-off of cumulative unrealized losses on the 80 Park Plaza interest rate swap described above.
Net income attributable to Columbia Property Trust was $48.0 million, or $0.09 per share, for 2012, which represents a decrease from $56.6 million, or $0.10 per share, for 2011. The decrease is primarily due to settling the debt and swaps on the 80 Park Plaza Building and the 222 East 41st Street Building for a net gain in 2011, partially offset by lower amortization expense due to the expiration and restructuring of in-place leases in 2012. We expect future net income to fluctuate based on future leasing activity and future acquisition and disposition activity. Should the U.S. economic recovery remain sluggish, or the U.S. real estate markets remain depressed for a prolonged period of time, the creditworthiness of our tenants and our ability to achieve market rents comparable to the leases currently in place at our properties may suffer and could lead to a decline in net income over the long term.
Discontinued Operations
Income from discontinued operations was $7.5 million for 2012, as compared with $8.6 million for 2011. As further explained in Note 12, Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations, to the accompanying consolidated financial statements, properties meeting certain criterion for disposal are classified as "discontinued operations" in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations for all periods presented. For 2012 and 2011, discontinued operations include the nine properties disposed of in the Nine Property Sale, which closed for a net gain of $3.2 million after recognizing an $18.5 million impairment loss on the 180 E 100 South Building, one of the properties in the Nine Property Sale; 5995 Opus Parkway and Emerald Point, which sold for total gains of $16.9 million in January 2012; and the Manhattan Towers property, which was transferred to an affiliate of its lender in connection with settling a $75.0 million mortgage note through a deed in lieu of foreclosure transaction in September 2011.
Comparison of the year ended December 31, 2010 versus the year ended December 31, 2011
Continuing Operations
Rental income was $441.9 million for 2011, which represents an increase from $396.1 million for 2010, primarily due to properties acquired or placed in service during 2010 and the first three months of 2011.
Tenant reimbursements and property operating costs were $102.9 million and $167.4 million, respectively, for 2011, which represents an increase from tenant reimbursements and property operating costs of $93.4 million and $151.5 million, respectively, for 2010, primarily due to properties acquired or placed in service during 2010 and 2011.
Hotel income, net of hotel operating costs, was $3.2 million for 2011, which represents an increase from $2.8 million for 2010, primarily due to an increase in the average occupancy rate during 2011.
Other property income was $10.9 million for 2011, which represents an increase from $1.2 million for 2010, primarily due to fees earned in connection with lease terminations at 4100-4300 Wildwood Parkway, Bannockburn Lake II, and other properties.
Asset and property management fees were $37.4 million for 2011, which represents an increase from $34.2 million for 2010, primarily due to properties acquired and placed into service during 2010 and 2011.
Depreciation was $110.7 million for 2011, which represents an increase from $92.6 million for 2010, primarily due to growth in the portfolio in 2010 and the first three months of 2011.
Amortization was $111.5 million for 2011, which represents an increase from $103.5 million for 2010, primarily due to growth in the portfolio in 2010 and the first three months of 2011.


Page 29


General and administrative expenses remained relatively consistent at $23.7 million for 2011 as compared with $23.2 million for 2010.
Acquisition fees and expenses were $11.3 million for 2011, which represents an increase from $10.8 million for 2010, primarily due to the acquisition of the Market Square Buildings in March 2011, partially offset by the impact of closing our third public offering effective June 30, 2010. Through July 31, 2011, acquisition fees were incurred at 2.0% of gross offering proceeds, subject to certain limitations; effective August 1, 2011, acquisition fees are incurred at 1.0% of the property purchase price (excluding acquisition expenses).
Interest expense was $106.3 million for 2011, which represents an increase from $82.0 million for 2010, primarily due to debt used to fund the acquisition of the Market Square Buildings, including incremental short-term borrowings, a $250.0 million unsecured bond offering, and a $325.0 million mortgage note secured by the Market Square Buildings.
Interest and other income remained relatively consistent at $42.4 million for 2011 and $43.1 million for 2010.
Loss on interest rate swaps was $38.4 million for 2011, which represents an increase from $19.1 million for 2010, primarily due to writing off $15.1 million of cumulative unrealized market value adjustments on the interest rate swap on the 80 Park Plaza Building mortgage note upon settling of this swap contract in December 2011, prior to maturity.
We recognized a gain on early extinguishment of debt of $53.0 million for 2011 in connection with settling the 222 East 41st Street Building mortgage note and the 80 Park Place Building mortgage note and their related swaps in December 2011, which is partially offset by the $15.1 million write-off of cumulative unrealized losses on the 80 Park Plaza interest rate swap described above.
We recognized net income attributable to Columbia Property Trust of $56.6 million ($0.10 per share) for 2011, which represents an increase from $23.3 million ($0.04 per share) for 2010. The increase is primarily attributable to gains recognized on negotiated settlements of debt and related interest rate swap agreements in 2011. Growth in our portfolio in 2010 and 2011 generated additional real estate operating income, which is offset by additional interest expense, resulting from increasing the percentage of borrowings used in our capital structure during 2011.
Discontinued Operations
Income from discontinued operations was $8.6 million for 2011 as compared with $3.5 million for 2010. As further explained in Note 12, Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations, to the accompanying consolidated financial statements, properties meeting certain criterion for disposal are classified as "Discontinued Operations" in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations for all periods presented. Therefore, the properties sold in 2012, including the nine properties in the Nine Property Sale, 5595 Opus Parkway, and Emerald Point, have been classified as discontinued operations for 2012, 2011, and 2010. Additionally, discontinued operations for 2011 and 2010 include the Manhattan Towers property, which was transferred to an affiliate of its lender in connection with settling a $75.0 million mortgage note through a deed in lieu of foreclosure transaction in September 2011.
Funds From Operations and Adjusted Funds From Operations
Funds from Operations ("FFO"), as defined by the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts ("NAREIT"), is a non-GAAP financial measure considered by some equity REITs in evaluating operating performance. FFO is computed as GAAP net income (loss), regardless of classification, as continuing or discontinuing operations, adjusted to exclude: extraordinary items, gains (or losses) from property sales (including deemed sales and settlements of pre-existing relationships), depreciation and amortization of real estate assets, impairment losses related to sales of real estate assets, and adjustments for earnings allocated to noncontrolling interests in consolidated partnerships. Effective December 31, 2011, we adjusted our calculation of FFO to be consistent with NAREIT's recent Accounting and Financial Standards Hot Topics, which clarify that impairment losses on real estate assets should be excluded from FFO. We believe it is useful to consider GAAP net income, adjusted to exclude the above-mentioned items, when assessing our performance, because excluding the above-described adjustments highlights the impact on our operations from trends in occupancy rates, rental rates, operating costs, general and administrative expenses, and interest costs, which may not be readily apparent from GAAP net income alone. We do not, however, believe that FFO is the best measure of the sustainability of our operating performance. Changes in the GAAP accounting and reporting rules that were put into effect after the establishment of NAREIT's definition of FFO in 1999 are resulting in the inclusion of a number of items in FFO that do not correlate with the sustainability of our operating performance (e.g., acquisition expenses, market value adjustments to interest rate swaps, and amortization of certain in-place lease intangible assets and liabilities, among others). Therefore, in addition to FFO, we present Adjusted Funds from Operations ("AFFO"), a non-GAAP financial measure. AFFO is calculated by adjusting FFO to exclude the income and expenses that we believe are not reflective of the sustainability of our ongoing operating performance, as further explained below:


Page 30


Additional amortization of lease assets (liabilities). GAAP implicitly assumes that the value of intangible lease assets (liabilities) diminishes predictably over time and, thus, requires these charges to be recognized ratably over the respective lease terms. Such intangible lease assets (liabilities) arise from the allocation of acquisition price related to direct costs associated with obtaining a new tenant, the value of opportunity costs associated with lost rentals, the value of tenant relationships, and the value of effective rental rates of in-place leases that are above or below market rates of comparable leases at the time of acquisition. Like real estate values, market lease rates in aggregate have historically risen or fallen with local market conditions. As a result, we believe that by excluding these charges, AFFO provides useful supplemental information that is reflective of the performance of our real estate investments, which is useful in assessing the sustainability of our operations.
Straight-line rental income. In accordance with GAAP, rental payments are recognized as income on a straight-line basis over the terms of the respective leases. Thus, for any given period, straight-line rental income represents the difference between the contractual rental billings for that period and the average rental billings over the lease term for the same length of time. This application results in income recognition that can differ significantly from the current contract terms. By adjusting for this item, we believe AFFO provides useful supplemental information reflective of the realized economic impact of our leases, which is useful in assessing the sustainability of our operating performance.
Loss on interest rate swaps and remeasurement of loss on foreign currency. These items relate to fair value adjustments, which are based on the impact of current market fluctuations, underlying market conditions and the performance of the specific holding, which is not attributable to our current operating performance. By adjusting for this item, we believe that AFFO provides useful supplemental information by focusing on the changes in our core operating fundamentals (rather than anticipated gains or losses that may never be realized), which is useful in assessing the sustainability of our operations.
Noncash interest expense. This item represents amortization of financing costs paid in connection with executing our debt instruments, and the accretion of premiums (and amortization of discounts) on certain of our debt instruments.  GAAP requires these items to be recognized over the remaining term of the respective debt instrument, which may not correlate with the ongoing operations of our real estate portfolio. By excluding these items, we believe that AFFO provides supplemental information that allows for better comparability of reporting periods, which is useful in assessing the sustainability of our operations.
Real estate acquisition-related costs. Acquisition expenses are incurred for investment purposes (i.e., to promote portfolio appreciation and generation of future earnings over the long term) and, therefore, do not correlate with the ongoing operations of our portfolio. By excluding these items, we believe that AFFO provides supplemental information that allows for better comparability of reporting periods, which is useful in assessing the sustainability of our operations.
Gain on early extinguishment of debt. This item represents gains resulting from debt settled prior to the stated maturity date, which do not correlate with our ongoing operating performance. By adjusting for this item, we believe that AFFO provides better comparability of reporting periods, which is useful in assessing the sustainability of our operations.


Page 31


Reconciliations of net income to FFO and to AFFO (in thousands):
 
Years ended December 31,
 
2012
 
2011
 
2010
Reconciliation of Net Income to Funds From Operations and Adjusted Funds
 From Operations:
 
 
 
 
 
Net income attributable to the common stockholders of Columbia Property
  Trust, Inc.
$
48,039

 
$
56,642

 
$
23,266

Adjustments:
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation of real estate assets
120,307

 
119,772

 
102,558

Amortization of lease-related costs
102,234

 
120,384

 
117,569

Impairment loss on real estate assets
18,467

 
5,817

 

(Gain) loss on disposition of discontinued operations
(20,117
)
 

 
161

Total Funds From Operations adjustments
220,891

 
245,973

 
220,288

Funds From Operations
268,930

 
302,615

 
243,554

Other income (expenses) included in net income, which do not correlate with
  our operations:
 
 
 
 
 
Additional amortization of lease assets (liabilities)
(1,752
)
 
2,423

 
6,791

Straight-line rental income
(11,033
)
 
(22,165
)
 
(6,544
)
(Gain) loss on interest rate swaps
(173
)
 
28,635

 
9,485

Remeasurement loss on foreign currency

 

 
686

Noncash interest expense
3,881

 
23,967

 
18,703

Gain on early extinguishment of debt

 
(66,540
)
 

Subtotal
(9,077
)
 
(33,680
)
 
29,121

Real estate acquisition-related costs
1,876

 
11,250

 
10,779

Adjusted Funds From Operations
$
261,729

 
$
280,185

 
$
283,454


Portfolio Information
As of December 31, 2012, we owned controlling interests in 61 office properties and one hotel, which includes 83 operational buildings. These properties are composed of approximately 21.0 million square feet of commercial space located in 19 states; the District of Columbia; and Moscow, Russia. Of these office properties, 60 are wholly owned and one is owned through a consolidated subsidiary. As of December 31, 2012, the office properties were approximately 92.9% leased. Annualized Lease Revenue is defined in Item 2, Properties.
As of December 31, 2012, our five highest geographic concentrations were as follows:
Location
 
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
(in thousands)
 
Rentable
Square Feet
(in thousands)
 
Percentage of
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
Atlanta
 
$
75,353

 
3,462

 
15
%
Washington, D.C.
 
57,524

 
857

 
11
%
Northern New Jersey
 
54,249

 
2,177

 
10
%
San Francisco
 
44,700

 
959

 
9
%
Baltimore
 
37,613

 
1,194

 
7
%
 
 
$
269,439

 
8,649

 
52
%








Page 32


As of December 31, 2012, our five highest tenant industry concentrations were as follows:
Industry
 
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
(in thousands)
 
Rentable
Square Feet
(in thousands)
 
Percentage of
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
Legal Services
 
$
77,310

 
1,436

 
15
%
Depository Institutions
 
72,883

 
2,393

 
14
%
Communications
 
50,357

 
2,566

 
10
%
Industrial Machinery & Equipment
 
38,844

 
1,681

 
7
%
Electric, Gas & Sanitary Services
 
36,980

 
1,880

 
7
%
 
 
$
276,374

 
9,956

 
53
%
As of December 31, 2012, our five highest tenant concentrations were as follows:
Tenant
 
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
(in thousands)
 
Percentage of
2012 Annualized
Lease Revenue
AT&T
 
$
47,629

 
9
%
Wells Fargo
 
29,297

 
6
%
Jones Day
 
27,135

 
5
%
IBM
 
24,954

 
5
%
Key Bank
 
19,110

 
4
%
 
 
$
148,125

 
29
%
For more information on our portfolio, see Item 2. Properties.
Election as a REIT
We have elected to be taxed as a REIT under the Code, and have operated as such beginning with our taxable year ended December 31, 2003. To qualify as a REIT, we must meet certain organizational and operational requirements, including a requirement to distribute at least 90% of our adjusted taxable income, as defined in the Code, to our stockholders, computed without regard to the dividends-paid deduction and by excluding our net capital gain. As a REIT, we generally will not be subject to federal income tax on income that we distribute to our stockholders. If we fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year, we will then be subject to federal income taxes on our taxable income for that year and for the four years following the year during which qualification is lost, unless the Internal Revenue Service grants us relief under certain statutory provisions. Such an event could materially affect our net income and net cash available for distribution to our stockholders. However, we believe that we are organized and operate in such a manner as to qualify for treatment as a REIT for federal income tax purposes.
Wells TRS II, LLC ("Wells TRS"); Wells KCP TRS, LLC ("Wells KCP TRS"); and Wells Energy TRS, LLC ("Wells Energy TRS") (collectively, the "TRS Entities") are wholly owned subsidiaries of Columbia Property Trust and are organized as Delaware limited liability companies and include the operations of, among other things, a full-service hotel. We have elected to treat the TRS Entities as taxable REIT subsidiaries. We may perform certain additional, noncustomary services for tenants of our buildings through the the TRS Entities; however, any earnings related to such services are subject to federal and state income taxes. In addition, for us to continue to qualify as a REIT, we must limit our investments in taxable REIT subsidiaries to 25% of the value of our total assets. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are established for temporary differences between the financial reporting basis and the tax basis of assets and liabilities at the enacted rates expected to be in effect when the temporary differences reverse.
No provisions for federal income taxes have been made in our accompanying consolidated financial statements, other than the provisions relating to Wells TRS and Wells KCP TRS, as we made distributions in excess of taxable income for the periods presented. We are subject to certain state and local taxes related to property operations in certain locations, which have been provided for in our accompanying consolidated financial statements.
Inflation
We are exposed to inflation risk, as income from long-term leases is the primary source of our cash flows from operations. There are provisions in the majority of our tenant leases that are intended to protect us from, and mitigate the risk of, the impact of inflation. These provisions include rent steps, reimbursement billings for operating expense pass-through charges, real estate tax and insurance reimbursements on a per-square-foot basis, or in some cases, annual reimbursement of operating expenses above a


Page 33


certain per-square-foot allowance. However, due to the long-term nature of the leases, the leases may not reset frequently enough to fully cover inflation.
Application of Critical Accounting Policies
Our accounting policies have been established to conform with GAAP. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to use judgment in the application of accounting policies, including making estimates and assumptions. These judgments affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the dates of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting periods. If our judgment or interpretation of the facts and circumstances relating to various transactions had been different, it is possible that different accounting policies would have been applied, thus resulting in a different presentation of the financial statements. Additionally, other companies may utilize different estimates that may impact the comparability of our results of operations to those of companies in similar businesses.
Investment in Real Estate Assets
We are required to make subjective assessments as to the useful lives of our depreciable assets. We consider the period of future benefit of the asset to determine the appropriate useful lives. These assessments have a direct impact on net income. The estimated useful lives of our assets by class are as follows:
 
Buildings
  
40 years
 
Building improvements
  
5-25 years
 
Site improvements
  
15 years
 
Tenant improvements
  
Shorter of economic life or lease term
 
Intangible lease assets
  
Lease term
Evaluating the Recoverability of Real Estate Assets
We continually monitor events and changes in circumstances that could indicate that the carrying amounts of the real estate and related intangible assets of both operating properties and properties under construction, in which we have an ownership interest, either directly or through investments in joint ventures, may not be recoverable. When indicators of potential impairment are present that suggest that the carrying amounts of real estate assets and related intangible assets (liabilities) may not be recoverable, we assess the recoverability of these assets by determining whether the respective carrying values will be recovered through the estimated undiscounted future operating cash flows expected from the use of the assets and their eventual disposition. In the event that such expected undiscounted future cash flows do not exceed the carrying values, we adjust the carrying value of the real estate assets and related intangible assets to the estimated fair values, pursuant to the property, plant, and equipment accounting standard for the impairment or disposal of long-lived assets, and recognize an impairment loss. Estimated fair values are calculated based on the following information, in order of preference, depending upon availability: (i) recently quoted market prices, (ii) market prices for comparable properties, or (iii) the present value of future cash flows, including estimated salvage value. Certain of our assets may be carried at more than an amount that could be realized in a current disposition transaction.
Projections of expected future operating cash flows require that we estimate future market rental income amounts subsequent to the expiration of current lease agreements, property operating expenses, the number of months it takes to re-lease the property, and the number of years the property is held for investment, among other factors. The subjectivity of assumptions used in the future cash flow analysis, including discount rates, could result in an incorrect assessment of the property's fair value and could result in the misstatement of the carrying value of our real estate assets and related intangible assets and net income (loss).
During 2012, we focused on improving our market concentration by assembling, marketing, and negotiating the Nine Property Sale. As a result, we evaluated the recoverability of the carrying values of these assets pursuant to the accounting policy outlined above and determined that the carrying value of the 180 E 100 South property in Salt Lake City, Utah, one of the properties in the Nine Property Sale, to no longer be recoverable due to refining our disposition strategy and shortening our expected holding period for this asset in the third quarter of 2012. As a result, we reduced the carrying value of the 180 E 100 South property to reflect fair value and recorded a corresponding property impairment loss of $18.5 million in the third quarter of 2012.
During the third quarter of 2011, we evaluated the recoverability of the carrying value of the Manhattan Towers property and determined that it was not recoverable, as defined by the accounting policy outlined above. The Manhattan Towers property is located in Manhattan Beach, California, and includes two office buildings with total occupancy of 22%. In the third quarter of 2011, upon considering the economic impact of various property disposition scenarios not previously contemplated, including the likelihood of achieving the projected returns associated with each scenario, we opted to transfer the Manhattan Towers property


Page 34


to an affiliate of the lender in full settlement of a $75.0 million nonrecourse mortgage loan through a deed in lieu of foreclosure transaction, which closed on September 6, 2011. As a result of this transaction, we reduced the carrying value of the Manhattan Towers property to its fair value, estimated based on the present value of estimated future property cash flows, by recognizing a property impairment loss of approximately $5.8 million, which is included in operating income from discontinued operations in the statement of operations, and recognized a gain on early extinguishment of debt of $13.5 million, which is reflected as gain on disposition of discontinued operations in the statement of operations.
The fair value measurements used in this evaluation of nonfinancial assets are considered to be Level 3 valuations within the fair value hierarchy outlined above, as there are significant unobservable inputs. Examples of inputs that were utilized in the fair value calculations include estimated holding periods, discount rates, market capitalization rates, expected lease rental rates, and potential sales prices. The table below represents the detail of the adjustments recognized for the years ended 2012 and 2011 (in thousands) using Level 3 inputs.
 
 
Property
 
Net Book Value
 
Impairment Loss Recognized
 
Fair Value
For the year ended December 31, 2012
 
180 E 100 South
 
$
30,847

 
$
(18,467
)
 
$
12,380

For the year ended December 31, 2011
 
Manhattan Towers
 
$
65,317

 
$
(5,817
)
 
$
59,500

Allocation of Purchase Price of Acquired Assets
Upon the acquisition of real properties, we allocate the purchase price of properties to tangible assets, consisting of land and building, site improvements, and identified intangible assets and liabilities, including the value of in-place leases, based in each case on our estimate of their fair values.
The fair values of the tangible assets of an acquired property (which includes land and building) are determined by valuing the property as if it were vacant, and the "as-if-vacant" value is then allocated to land and building based on our determination of the relative fair value of these assets. We determine the as-if-vacant fair value of a property using methods similar to those used by independent appraisers. Factors we consider in performing these analyses include an estimate of carrying costs during the expected lease-up periods, considering current market conditions and costs to execute similar leases, including leasing commissions and other related costs. In estimating carrying costs, we include real estate taxes, insurance, and other operating expenses during the expected lease-up periods based on current market demand.
Intangible Assets and Liabilities Arising from In-Place Leases where We are the Lessor
As further described below, in-place leases where we are the lessor may have values related to direct costs associated with obtaining a new tenant, opportunity costs associated with lost rentals that are avoided by acquiring an in-place lease, tenant relationships, and effective contractual rental rates that are above or below market rates:
Direct costs associated with obtaining a new tenant, including commissions, tenant improvements, and other direct costs, are estimated based on management's consideration of current market costs to execute a similar lease. Such direct costs are included in intangible lease origination costs in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and are amortized to expense over the remaining terms of the respective leases.
The value of opportunity costs associated with lost rentals avoided by acquiring an in-place lease is calculated based on the contractual amounts to be paid pursuant to the in-place leases over a market absorption period for a similar lease. Such opportunity costs are included in intangible lease assets in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and are amortized to expense over the remaining terms of the respective leases.
The value of tenant relationships is calculated based on expected renewal of a lease or the likelihood of obtaining a particular tenant for other locations. Values associated with tenant relationships are included in intangible lease assets in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and are amortized to expense over the remaining terms of the respective leases.
The value of effective rental rates of in-place leases that are above or below the market rates of comparable leases is calculated based on the present value (using a discount rate that reflects the risks associated with the leases acquired) of the difference between (i) the contractual amounts to be received pursuant to the in-place leases and (ii) management's estimate of fair market lease rates for the corresponding in-place leases, measured over a period equal to the remaining terms of the leases. The capitalized above-market and below-market lease values are recorded as intangible lease assets or liabilities and amortized as an adjustment to rental income over the remaining terms of the respective leases.


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Evaluating the Recoverability of Intangible Assets and Liabilities
The values of intangible lease assets and liabilities are determined based on assumptions made at the time of acquisition and have defined useful lives, which correspond with the lease terms. There may be instances in which intangible lease assets and liabilities become impaired and we are required to write off the remaining asset or liability immediately or over a shorter period of time. Lease restructurings, including lease terminations and lease extensions, may impact the value and useful life of in-place leases. In-place leases that are terminated, partially terminated, or modified will be evaluated for impairment if the original in-place lease terms have been modified. In the event that the discounted cash flows of the original in-place lease stream do not exceed the discounted modified in-place lease stream, we adjust the carrying value of the intangible lease assets to the discounted cash flows and recognize an impairment loss. For in-place lease extensions that are executed more than one year prior to the original in-place lease expiration date, the useful life of the in-place lease will be extended over the new lease term with the exception of those in-place lease components, such as lease commissions and tenant allowances, which have been renegotiated for the extended term. Renegotiated in-place lease components, such as lease commissions and tenant allowances, will be amortized over the shorter of the useful life of the asset or the new lease term.
Intangible Assets and Liabilities Arising from In-Place Leases where We are the Lessee
In-place ground leases where we are the lessee may have value associated with effective contractual rental rates that are above or below market rates. Such values are calculated based on the present value (using a discount rate that reflects the risks associated with the leases acquired) of the difference between (i) the contractual amounts to be paid pursuant to the in-place lease and (ii) management's estimate of fair market lease rates for the corresponding in-place lease, measured over a period equal to the remaining terms of the leases. The capitalized above-market and below-market in-place lease values are recorded as intangible lease liabilities or assets and amortized as an adjustment to property operating cost over the remaining term of the respective leases.
Related-Party Transactions and Agreements
During the periods presented, we were party to agreements with WREAS II, our advisor, and its affiliates, whereby we incurred and paid fees and reimbursements to WREAS II and its affiliates for certain advisory services and property management services. On February 28, 2013, we terminated the related agreements and acquired WREAS II and WRES, including the employees necessary to perform the corresponding corporate and property management functions. See Note 10, Related-Party Transition and Agreements, of our accompanying consolidated financial statements for details of our related-party transactions, agreements, and fees.
Commitments and Contingencies
We are subject to certain commitments and contingencies with regard to certain transactions. Refer to Note 6, Commitments and Contingencies, of our accompanying consolidated financial statements for further explanation. Examples of such commitments and contingencies include:
obligations under operating leases;
obligations under capital leases;
commitments under existing lease agreements; and
litigation.
Subsequent Events
We have evaluated subsequent events in connection with the preparation of our consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in this report on Form 10-K and noted the following items in addition to those disclosed elsewhere in this report:
Chairman of the Board
On January 1, 2013, our board of directors ("the Board") unanimously appointed John L. Dixon as its Chairman, succeeding the former Chairman of the Board, Leo F. Wells, III. Mr. Wells and the other board members believe that having an independent Board Chairman is in keeping with corporate governance best practices and will benefit the company as it continues to prepare for a successful liquidity event. Mr. Wells, who will continue to serve the company as a member of the Board, had served as Chairman of the Board since the company's inception and previously served as president of the company from its inception until July 2010. Mr. Dixon has served the company as an independent director since 2008 and brings more than 40 years of experience in the financial services industry to the leadership of the company.




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Executive Officers
Effective February 28, 2013, Douglas P. Williams resigned as an executive officer of the company, including his positions as Executive Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Principal Financial Officer. Mr. Williams also indicated that, for personal reasons, he would not stand for re-election as a director.  Mr. Williams informed us of these decisions on February 25, 2013.  Mr. Williams will remain an executive officer of WREF.
Effective February 28, 2013, the board of directors unanimously appointed Wendy W. Gill as an executive officer to succeed Mr. Williams as the company's Treasurer and Principal Accounting Officer, and to serve as the company's interim Principal Financial Officer. Ms. Gill currently serves as Columbia Property Trust's Senior Vice President of Corporate Operations and Chief Accounting Officer.
Name Change and Other Related Changes
On February 25, 2013, we filed Articles of Amendment with the Maryland State Department of Assessments and Taxation (the "SDAT") to change our name from Wells Real Estate Investment Trust II, Inc. to Columbia Property Trust, Inc. The name change was approved by our board of directors and effective upon filing with the SDAT. In connection with our name change, we also changed the name of our operating partnership to Columbia Property Trust Operating Partnership, L.P.; WREAS II to Columbia Property Trust Advisory Services, LLC; and WRES to Columbia Property Trust Services, LLC. We expect to effect a similar name change for the TRS Entities in the near future.
On February 26, 2013, in connection with our name change and transition to self-management, our board of directors approved certain amendments to our bylaws, our share redemption program, and our corporate governance documents to be effective as of February 28, 2013. We amended our bylaws to reflect our new name and management structure, as well as to conform with changes made to our charter, as approved at our Annual Meeting of Stockholders on July 18, 2012. We amended our share redemption program to change our name, update the contact information for redemption requests, and adjust how we handle the pro-rata redemptions. In addition, we amended our Corporate Governance Guidelines, Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee Charter, Audit Committee Charter, Code of Ethics, Whistleblower Policy, and Insider Trader Policy to reflect our new name, as well as to reflect our new management structure. Our corporate governance documents are available on our website at www.columbiapropertytrust.com.
Commencement of Self-Management
On February 28, 2013, the WREAS II Assignment Option and WRES Assignment Option closed, and in connection therewith, the Renewal Advisory Agreement and Renewal Investor Services Agreement terminated. These agreements and options are described in Note 10, Related Party Transactions and Agreements, of the accompanying consolidated financial statements.
Investor Services Agreement
Effective February 28, 2013, upon the closing of the WREAS II Assignment Option, we entered into the Investor Services Agreement with WREF, which requires WREF to provide the stockholder and communication services to us previously provided for under the 2012 Investor Services Agreement and the Renewal Investor Services Agreement and provides for us to compensate WREF for the services based on a reimbursement of costs and payroll plus a premium. These agreements are described in Note 10, Related Party Transactions and Agreements, of the accompanying consolidated financial statements.
Consulting Services Agreement
On February 28, 2013, we entered a consulting services agreement with WREF (the "Consulting Services Agreement"). Under the Consulting Services Agreement, WREF will provide consulting services with respect to the same matters that WREAS II and its affiliates provided advisory services under the Renewal Advisory Agreement. Payments under the Consulting Services Agreement will be monthly fees in the same amount as the asset management fees that would have been paid under the Renewal Advisory Agreement through December 31, 2013, if the Renewal Advisory Agreement was not terminated. If we elect to terminate the Consulting Services Agreement early for cause, we would not be required to make further payments under the agreement other than fees earned by WREF and unpaid at the time of termination. If we terminate the Consulting Services Agreement other than for cause, we would be required to make a fee acceleration payment, which is calculated as the fees incurred in the last month prior to termination, adjusted for partial months, multiplied by the number of months remaining between the time of termination and December 31, 2013.



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ITEM 7A.
QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
As a result of our debt facilities, we are exposed to interest rate changes. Our interest rate risk management objectives are to limit the impact of interest rate changes on earnings and cash flow, primarily through a low to moderate level of overall borrowings. However, we currently have a substantial amount of debt outstanding. We manage our ratio of fixed- to floating-rate debt with the objective of achieving a mix that we believe is appropriate in light of anticipated changes in interest rates. We closely monitor interest rates and will continue to consider the sources and terms of our borrowing facilities to determine whether we have appropriately guarded ourselves against the risk of increasing interest rates in future periods.
Additionally, we have entered into interest rate swaps, and may enter into other interest rate swaps, caps, or other arrangements to mitigate our interest rate risk on a related financial instrument. We do not enter into derivative or interest rate transactions for speculative purposes; however, certain of our derivatives may not qualify for hedge accounting treatment. All of our debt was entered into for other-than-trading purposes. As of December 31, 2012 and 2011, the estimated fair value of our line of credit and notes payable and bonds was $1.7 billion and $1.5 billion, respectively.
Our financial instruments consist of both fixed- and variable-rate debt. As of December 31, 2012, our consolidated debt consisted of the following, in thousands:
 
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
 
2016
 
2017
 
Thereafter
 
Total
Maturing debt:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Effectively variable-rate debt
 
$

 
$

 
$
42,000

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
42,000

Effectively fixed-rate debt
 
$
28,755

 
$
101,481

 
$
211,104

 
$
491,963

 
$
178,139

 
$
596,854

 
$
1,608,296

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Average interest rate:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Effectively variable-rate debt
 
%
 
%
 
2.62
%
 
%
 
%
 
%
 
2.62
%
Effectively fixed-rate debt
 
5.94
%
 
5.07
%
 
4.76
%
 
2.91
%
 
5.28
%
 
5.43
%
 
4.54
%
Our financial instruments consist of both fixed-rate and variable-rate debt. Our variable-rate borrowings consist of the JPMorgan Chase Credit Facility, the $450 Million Term Loan, the 333 Market Street Building mortgage note, and the Three Glenlake Building mortgage note. However, only the JPMorgan Chase Credit Facility bears interest at an effectively variable rate, as the variable rate on the $450.0 Million Term Loan, the 333 Market Street Building mortgage note, and the Three Glenlake Building mortgage note have been effectively fixed through the interest rate swap agreements described below.
As of December 31, 2012, we had $42.0 million outstanding under the JPMorgan Chase Credit Facility; $450.0 million outstanding on the $450 Million Term Loan; $208.3 million outstanding on the 333 Market Street Building mortgage note; $26.3 million outstanding on the Three Glenlake Building mortgage note; $248.7 million in 5.875% bonds outstanding; and $675.0 million outstanding on fixed-rate, term mortgage loans. The weighted-average interest rate of all our debt instruments was 4.49% as of December 31, 2012.
On February 3, 2012, we closed on the $450 Million Term Loan, a four-year, unsecured term loan with a syndicate of banks led by JPMorgan Chase Bank (the "$450 Million Term Loan"), which yielded initial gross proceeds of $375.0 million. The $450 Million Term Loan provided for two accordion options, both of which have been exercised, resulting in additional gross proceeds of $40.0 million in the second quarter of 2012 and $35.0 million in the third quarter of 2012, for total outstanding borrowings of $450.0 million as of December 31, 2012. The $450 Million Term Loan bears interest at the London Interbank Offered Rate ("LIBOR"), plus an applicable base margin; however, we effectively fixed the interest rate on the initial borrowing and subsequent borrowings under the accordion options (assuming no change in our corporate credit rating) at 2.63% per annum with interest rate swaps executed contemporaneously with the loan and the accordion options. The $450 Million Term Loan matures on February 3, 2016, provided that certain conditions are met prior to that date. Furthermore, provided that certain additional conditions are met prior to, and at maturity, the $450 Million Term Loan shall become eligible for a one-year extension upon paying an extension fee equal to 0.15% of the outstanding balance. The total proceeds from the $450 Million Term Loan were used to repay temporary borrowings, and thereby create additional borrowing capacity, under the JPMorgan Chase Credit Facility. The majority of these temporary borrowings were drawn to settle mortgage loans during the second half of 2011 and early 2012.
During the first quarter of 2012, we used cash on hand and proceeds from the JPMorgan Chase Credit Facility to fully repay the Highland Landmark Building mortgage note of $33.8 million at its maturity. During 2012 and 2011, we made interest payments of approximately $50.1 million and $53.1 million, respectively, related to our line of credit and notes payable. In addition, we made interest payments of approximately $14.7 million and $7.2 million in 2012 and 2011, respectively, related to our 2018 Bonds Payable.


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Approximately $1,608.3 million of our total debt outstanding as of December 31, 2012, is subject to fixed rates, either directly or when coupled with an interest rate swap agreement. As of December 31, 2012, these balances incurred interest expense at an average interest rate of 4.54% and have expirations ranging from 2013 through 2023. A change in the market interest rate impacts the net financial instrument position of our fixed-rate debt portfolio; however, it has no impact on interest incurred or cash flows. The amounts outstanding on our variable-rate debt facilities in the future will largely depend upon the level of investor proceeds raised under our DRP and the rate at which we are able to employ such proceeds in acquisitions of real properties.
We do not believe there is any exposure to increases in interest rates related to the capital lease obligations of $586.0 million at December 31, 2012, as the obligations are at fixed interest rates.
Foreign Currency Risk
We are also subject to foreign exchange risk arising from our foreign operations in Russia. Foreign operations represented 2.0% and 1.9% of total assets at December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively, and 1.1%, 0.7%, and 0.6% of total revenue for 2012, 2011, and 2010, respectively. As compared with rates in effect at December 31, 2012, an increase or decrease in the U.S. dollar to Russian rouble exchange rate by 10% would not materially impact the accompanying consolidated financial statements.
ITEM 8.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
The financial statements and supplementary data filed as part of this report are set forth beginning on page F-1 of this report.
ITEM 9.
CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
There were no disagreements with our independent registered public accountants during 2012, 2011, or 2010.
ITEM 9A.
CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Management's Conclusions Regarding the Effectiveness of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
We carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of management, including the Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures pursuant to Rule 13a-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based upon that evaluation, the Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of the end of the period covered by this report in providing a reasonable level of assurance that information we are required to disclose in reports that we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods in SEC rules and forms, including providing a reasonable level of assurance that information required to be disclosed by us in such reports is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Principal Executive Officer and our Principal Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.
Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as a process designed by, or under the supervision of, the Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer and effected by our management and other personnel to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with GAAP and includes those policies and procedures that:
pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and disposition of our assets;
provide reasonable assurance that the transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP, and that our receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and/or members of the board of directors; and
provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of the inherent limitations of internal control over financial reporting, including the possibility of human error and the circumvention or overriding of controls, material misstatements may not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. In addition, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risks that controls may become inadequate because of changes and conditions or that the degree of compliance with policies or procedures may deteriorate. Accordingly, even internal


Page 39


controls determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance that the information required to be disclosed in reports filed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized, and represented within the time periods required.
Our management has assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting at December 31, 2012. To make this assessment, we used the criteria for effective internal control over financial reporting described in Internal Control Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this assessment, our management believes that our system of internal control over financial reporting met those criteria, and therefore our management has concluded that we maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2012.
This report does not include an attestation report of our registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management's report was not subject to attestation by our registered public accounting firm pursuant to temporary rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission that permit us to provide only management's report in this report.
Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
There have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended December 31, 2012 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
ITEM 9B.
OTHER INFORMATION
Property Management Agreement
On December 28, 2012, we entered an amendment to the Property Management Agreement solely to provide that immediately upon the closing of the WRES Assignment Option, the Property Management Agreement will terminate (the "Amendment to the Property Management Agreement"). The Property Management Agreement is described in Note 10, Related Party Transactions and Agreements, of the accompanying consolidated financial statements.
Executive Officers
Effective February 28, 2013, Douglas P. Williams resigned as an executive officer of the company, including his positions as Executive Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Principal Financial Officer. Mr. Williams also indicated that, for personal reasons, he would not stand for re-election as a director.  Mr. Williams informed us of these decisions on February 25, 2013.  Mr. Williams will remain an executive officer of WREF.
Effective February 28, 2013, the board of directors unanimously appointed Wendy W. Gill as an executive officer to succeed Mr. Williams as the company's Treasurer and Principal Accounting Officer, and to serve as the company's interim Principal Financial Officer. Ms. Gill, 38, currently serves as our Chief Accounting Officer, a role she has held since 2007, and Senior Vice President of Corporate Operations. Since our inception in 2003, Ms. Gill has provided oversight to the company's accounting and financial operations as an employee of WREF. Ms. Gill joined WREF in 2002 as Director of Financial Reporting and Accounting. From 2007 to 2011, Ms. Gill served as Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer for WREF, in which capacity she was responsible for the financial and reporting functions for the real estate programs sponsored by WREF, including the public REITs, various public and private limited partnerships, and 1031 Exchange programs. Prior to joining WREF she was a manager at Arthur Andersen in the firm's Atlanta and Washington, D.C. offices, working with various publicly traded and privately held companies, with a focus on the real estate, hospitality and financial services industries. Ms. Gill holds a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) designation from the Maryland State Board of Public Accountancy and is a member of the Georgia Society of Certified Public Accountants.
Name Change and Other Related Changes
On February 25, 2013, we filed Articles of Amendment with the SDAT to change our name from Wells Real Estate Investment Trust II, Inc. to Columbia Property Trust, Inc. The name change was approved by our board of directors and became effective upon filing with the SDAT. In connection with our name change, we also changed the name of our operating partnership to Columbia Property Trust Operating Partnership, L.P.; WREAS II to Columbia Property Trust Advisory Services, LLC; and WRES to Columbia Property Trust Services, LLC. We expect to effect a similar name change for the TRS Entities in the near future.
On February 26, 2013, in connection with our name change and transition to self-management, our board of directors approved certain amendments to our bylaws, our share redemption program, and our corporate governance documents to be effective as of February 28, 2013. We amended our bylaws to reflect our new name and management structure, as well as to conform with changes made to our charter, as approved at our Annual Meeting of Stockholders on July 18, 2012. We amended our share redemption program to change our name, update the contact information for redemption requests, and adjust how we handle the pro-rata redemptions. In addition, we amended our Corporate Governance Guidelines, Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee


Page 40


Charter, Audit Committee Charter, Code of Ethics, Whistleblower Policy, and Insider Trader Policy to reflect our new name, as well as to reflect our new management structure. Our corporate governance documents are available on our website at www.columbiapropertytrust.com.
Commencement of Self-Management
On February 28, 2013, the WREAS II Assignment Option and WRES Assignment Option closed, and in connection therewith, the Renewal Advisory Agreement and Renewal Investor Services Agreement terminated.
Investor Services Agreement
Effective February 28, 2013, upon the closing of the WREAS II Assignment Option, we entered into the Investor Services Agreement with WREF, which requires WREF to provide the stockholder and communication services to us, previously provided for under the 2012 Investor Services Agreement and the Renewal Investor Services Agreement and provides for us to compensate WREF for the services based on a reimbursement of costs and payroll plus a premium.
Consulting Services Agreement
On February 28, 2013, we entered a consulting services agreement with WREF (the "Consulting Services Agreement"). Under the Consulting Services Agreement, WREF will provide consulting services with respect to the same matters that WREAS II and its affiliates provided advisory services under the Renewal Advisory Agreement. Payments under the Consulting Services Agreement will be monthly fees in the same amount as the asset management fees that would have been paid under the Renewal Advisory Agreement through December 31, 2013, if the Renewal Advisory Agreement was not terminated. If we elect to terminate the Consulting Services Agreement early for cause, we would not be required to make further payments under the agreement other than fees earned by WREF and unpaid at the time of termination. If we terminate the Consulting Services Agreement other than for cause, we would be required to make a fee acceleration payment, which is calculated as the fees incurred in the last month prior to termination, adjusted for partial months, multiplied by the number of months remaining between the time of termination and December 31, 2013.



Page 41


PART III
We will file a definitive Proxy Statement for our 2013 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the "2013 Proxy Statement") with the SEC, pursuant to Regulation 14A, not later than 120 days after the end of our fiscal year. Accordingly, certain information required by Part III has been omitted under General Instruction G(3) to Form 10-K. Only those sections of the 2013 Proxy Statement that specifically address the items required to be set forth herein are incorporated by reference.
ITEM 10.
DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS, AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
We have adopted a Code of Ethics that applies to all of our executive officers and directors, including but not limited to, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer. Our Code of Ethics may be found at http://www.columbiapropertytrust.com.
The other information required by this Item is incorporated by reference from our 2013 Proxy Statement.
ITEM 11.
EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
The information required by this Item is incorporated by reference from our 2013 Proxy Statement.
ITEM 12.
SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS
The information required by this Item is incorporated by reference from our 2013 Proxy Statement.
ITEM 13.
CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE
Certain information required by this Item is incorporated by reference from our 2013 Proxy Statement.
Transactions with Related Persons
As discussed in Item 1. Business, during 2012, we established and carried out a plan to transition our external management platform to a self-managed structure. Effective February 28, 2013, services previously provided by our advisor and property manager will be provided by our employees (other than the services provided by WREF under the Investor Services Agreement). Our Conflicts Committee reviews and approves all related-party transactions requiring disclosure under Rule 404(a) of Regulation S-K, meaning any transaction, arrangement or relationship in which (i) the amount involved may be expected to exceed $120,000 in any fiscal year, (ii) we will be a participant, and (iii) a related person has a direct or indirect material interest. A related person is an executive officer, director or nominee for election as director, or a greater than 5% beneficial owner of our common stock, or an immediate family member of the foregoing. Approval of a related-party transaction requires a majority of the Conflicts Committee to find the transaction is fair and reasonable to us. Through February 27, 2013, prior to entering a related-party transaction other than the advisory agreement, a majority of the Conflicts Committee was also required to conclude that the transaction was fair and reasonable to us and on terms and conditions not less favorable to us than those available from unaffiliated third parties. In addition, our Code of Ethics lists examples of types of transactions with affiliates that would create prohibited conflicts of interest. Under the Code of Ethics, our officers and directors are required to promptly bring potential conflicts of interest to the attention of the chairman of our Audit Committee. The Conflicts Committee reviewed the material transactions between our affiliates and us. Set forth below is a description of such transactions.
Our Relationship with WREF and WREAS II
Advisory Agreement
From our inception through February 27, 2013, a subsidiary of WREF, including most recently WREAS II, provided our day-to-day management under the terms of several, uninterrupted advisory agreements with WREAS II dated most recently December 29, 2011; March 30, 2011; June 29, 2012; and December 28, 2012 (the "Advisory Agreement"). Among the services provided by our advisor, under the terms of the Advisory Agreement, were the following:
real estate acquisition services;
asset management services;
real estate disposition services;
property management oversight services; and
administrative services.


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Our advisor was at all times subject to the supervision of our board of directors and had only such authority as we delegated to it as our agent. We renewed the Advisory Agreement (the "Renewal Advisory Agreement") with our advisor, WREAS II, in December 2012. The Renewal Advisory Agreement remained in place through February 27, 2013, and was substantially the same as the advisory agreement that was in effect through December 31, 2012, except for a reduced monthly asset management fee and a cap on acquisition and disposition fees payable for 2012 and 2013 in aggregate. The WREAS II Assignment Option closed on February 28, 2013, and the Renewal Advisory Agreement terminated on that date.
From January 1, 2012, through the most recent date practicable, which was December 31, 2012, we have compensated our advisor as set forth below under the terms of the Advisory Agreement:
Asset management fees were incurred monthly at one-twelfth of 0.625% of the lesser of (i) gross cost, as defined, of all of our properties (other than those that failed to meet specified occupancy thresholds) and investments in joint ventures, or (ii) the aggregate value of our interest in the properties and joint ventures as established with the most recent asset-based valuation, until the monthly payment equals $2.7 million (or $32.5 million annualized), as of the last day of each preceding month. From April 2011 through June 2012, asset management fees were capped at $2.7 million per month (or $32.5 million annualized) following the March 2011 acquisition of the Market Square Buildings. Effective July 1, 2012, the cap on monthly asset management fees charged under the advisory agreement was reduced by $83,333 (or, a total savings of $0.5 million for the six months ended December 31, 2012), resulting in a cap of $2.6 million. From July 2012 through December 2012, asset management fees were capped at $2.6 million per month. With respect to (ii) above, our published net asset-based valuations did not impact asset management fees incurred to date due to the continued applicability of the caps described above. Asset management fees from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012, totaled approximately $32.0 million.
We reimbursed our advisor for all costs and expenses it incurred in fulfilling its asset management and administrative duties, which may have included wages, salaries, taxes, insurance, benefits, information technology, legal and travel, and other out-of-pocket expenses of employees engaged in ongoing management, administration, operations, and marketing functions on our behalf. We did not, however, reimburse our advisor for personnel costs in connection with services for which our advisor received acquisition fees or real estate commissions. Administrative reimbursements, net of reimbursements from tenants, from January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2012, totaled approximately $11.1 million.
Acquisition fees were previously incurred at 1% of the property purchase price (excluding acquisition expenses); however, in no event could total acquisition fees for the 2012 and 2013 calendar years exceed $1.5 million in aggregate. Acquisition fees from January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2012, totaled approximately $1.5 million.
The disposition fee payable for the sale of any property for which WREAS II provided substantial services was the lesser of (i) 0.3% or (ii) the broker fee paid to a third-party broker in connection with the sale. Disposition fees payable to WREAS II from July 1, 2012 through December 31, 2013 have an aggregate cap of $1.5 million. Disposition fees from January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2012, totaled $1.3 million, related to the Nine Property Sale.
Effective July 1, 2012, monthly occupancy costs of $21,000 were incurred for WREAS II's dedicated office space. Occupancy costs from January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2012, totaled approximately $126,000.
In addition to the Advisory Agreement, we have also entered into the following contracts with WREF and its subsidiaries:
Transition Services Agreement
We have entered into an agreement with WREAS II and WREF for transition services (the "Transition Services Agreement"), for the period from July 1, 2012 to December 31, 2013, pursuant to which (i) WREF is required to transfer the assets and employees necessary to provide the services under the Advisory Agreement (other than investor services and property management) to WREAS II by January 1, 2013, provided that if WREF is not able to transfer certain assets by then, WREF must use its commercially reasonable best efforts to transfer such delayed assets as promptly as possible, but no later than June 30, 2013; and (ii) we have the option to acquire WREAS II at any time during 2013 (the "WREAS II Assignment Option"). The WREAS II Assignment Option closed as of February 28, 2013. No payment is associated with the assignment; however, we are required to pay WREF for the work required to transfer sufficient employees, proprietary systems and processes, and assets to WREAS II to prepare for a successful transition to self-management. Accordingly, pursuant to the Transition Services Agreement, we are obligated to pay WREF a total of $6.0 million payable in 12 monthly installments of $0.5 million commencing on July 31, 2012. In addition, Columbia Property Trust and WREF will each pay half of any out-of-pocket and third-party costs and expenses incurred in connection with providing the services provided that our obligation to reimburse WREF for such expenses is limited to approximately $250,000 in the aggregate. Pursuant to the Transition Services Agreement, at the close of the WREAS II Assignment Option, we entered into a consulting services agreement with WREF as described below. The Transition Services Agreement is terminable if there is a material breach by WREF that is not cured or if WREF is in an insolvency proceeding. Otherwise, if we


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elect to terminate the agreement early, all remaining payments due under the agreement will be accelerated such that WREF receives $6.0 million in the aggregate. Payments under the Transition Services Agreement from January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2012, totaled approximately $3.0 million.
Amendment to Transition Services Agreement
On December 28, 2012, the Transition Services Agreement was amended as follows:
We may, at our option, acquire WRES, the entity charged with carrying out property management functions on behalf of WREAS II, for consideration of approximately $2.8 million payable to Wells Real Estate Funds in monthly installments from July 2013 through December 2013 under the Transition Services Agreement. As further explained in Item 1. Business, the company closed the above-described option effective February 28, 2013.
Upon terminating the Advisory Agreement and effecting the WREAS II Assignment Option, we will enter into a new investor services agreement with WREF, which provides for the payment of various fees and reimbursement of third- party expenses to WREF (the "Investor Services Agreement") in connection with the provision of such services.
Adjustments to acquisition and disposition fees as discussed above.
2012 Investor Services Agreement
Effective July 1, 2012, stockholder and communication services and expense reimbursements related thereto were separated out of the Advisory Agreement and covered under a separate agreement (the "2012 Investor Services Agreement"). The 2012 Investor Services Agreement requires WREF to provide the stockholder and communications services to us previously provided under the advisory agreement in effect through June 30, 2012. As the sole consideration for these services, we reimbursed WREF for expenses incurred in connection with carrying out such services, subject to the cap on "portfolio general and administrative expenses" and "personnel expenses" included in the Advisory Agreement and, thus, did not incur a separate fee.
Renewal Investor Services Agreement
The Renewal Investor Services Agreement, which was effective January 1, 2013, is between us and WREF (the "Renewal Investor Services Agreement"). It is substantially the same as the investor services agreement that was in effect through December 31, 2012. This agreement terminated on February 28, 2013, upon the exercise of the WREAS II Assignment Option.
Investor Services Agreement
Upon the exercise of the WREAS II Assignment Option, we entered into the Investor Services Agreement with WREF, which requires WREF to provide the same stockholder and communication services to us previously provided for under the 2012 Investor Services Agreement and, more recently, the Renewal Investor Services Agreement, and provides for us to compensate WREF for the services based on a reimbursement of costs and payroll plus a premium.
Consulting Services Agreement
Also upon the exercise of the WREAS II Assignment Option, we entered a consulting services agreement with WREF (the "Consulting Services Agreement"). Under the Consulting Services Agreement, WREF will provide consulting services with respect to the same matters that WREAS II and its affiliates would provide advisory services under the Renewal Advisory Agreement. Payments under the Consulting Services Agreement will be monthly fees in the same amount as the asset management fees that would have been paid under the Renewal Advisory Agreement through December 31, 2013, if the Renewal Advisory Agreement was not terminated. If we elect to terminate the Consulting Services Agreement early for cause, we would not be required to make further payments under the agreement other than fees earned by WREF and unpaid at the time of termination. If we terminate the Consulting Services Agreement other than for cause, we would be required to make a fee acceleration payment, which is calculated as the fees incurred in the last month prior to termination, adjusted for partial months, multiplied by the number of months remaining between the time of termination and December 31, 2013.
Our Relationship with Wells Management
Through June 30, 2012, Columbia Property Trust was party to a property management, leasing, and construction management agreement with WREAS II (the "Property Management Agreement"). Wells Management assigned all of its rights, title, and interest in the Property Management Agreement to WREAS II on January 1, 2011. Columbia Property Trust consented to such assignment as required by the Prior Property Management Agreement, as described in Note, 10 Related-Party Transactions and Agreements, of the accompanying notes to the financial statements. As part of this assignment, Wells Management guaranteed the performance of all of the WREAS II obligations under the Prior Property Management Agreement. Mr. Wells indirectly owns 100% of Wells


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Management. In consideration for supervising the management, leasing, and construction of certain of our properties, we paid the following fees to WREAS II under the Property Management Agreement:
For each property for which WREAS II provided property management services, we paid WREAS II a market-based property management fee based on gross monthly income of the property.
For each property for which WREAS II provided leasing agent services, WREAS II was entitled to: (i) a one-time fee in an amount not to exceed one month's rent for the initial rent-up of a newly constructed building; (ii) a market-based commission based on the net rent payable during the term of a new lease; (iii) a market-based commission based on the net rent payable during the term of any renewal or extension of any tenant lease; and (iv) a market-based commission based on the net rent payable with respect to expansion space for the remaining portion of the initial lease term.
For each property for which WREAS II provided construction management services, WREAS II was entitled to receive from us that portion of lease concessions for tenant-directed improvements that are specified in the lease or lease renewal, subject to a limit of 5% of such lease concessions and a management fee to be determined for other construction management activities.
Effective July 1, 2012, we entered into a new agreement with Wells Management for property management services, which was substantially the same as the Property Management Agreement, except that Wells Management is party to the agreement instead of WREAS II and will also provide us with portfolio-level property management services previously provided under the Advisory Agreement. These portfolio-level services shall be subject to the cap on "portfolio general and administrative expenses" and "personnel expenses" included in the Advisory Agreement as described above. The Property Management Agreement was terminated on February 28, 2013, when the WRES Assignment Option was effected. Going forward, our employees will provide the services previously provided by Wells Management.
Property management and construction fees incurred from January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2012 totaled $4.7 million.
ITEM 14.
PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES
The information required by this Item is incorporated by reference from our 2013 Proxy Statement.


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PART IV
ITEM 15.
EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES
(a) 1.    A list of the financial statements contained herein is set forth on page F-1 hereof.
(a) 2.    Schedule III Real Estate Assets and Accumulated Depreciation
Information with respect to this item begins on page S-1 hereof. Other schedules are omitted because of the absence of conditions under which they are required or because the required information is given in the financial statements or notes thereto.
(a) 3.
The Exhibits filed in response to Item 601 of Regulation S-K are listed on the Exhibit Index attached hereto.
(b)    See (a) 3 above.
(c)    See (a) 2 above.


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SIGNATURES
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.