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Alterola Biotech Inc. (ABTI) SEC Filing 10-K Annual Report for the fiscal year ending Thursday, March 31, 2022

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Alterola Biotech Inc.

CIK: 1442999 Ticker: ABTI
Cover - USD ($)
12 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2022
May 31, 2022
Sep. 30, 2021
Cover [Abstract]   
Document Type10-K  
Amendment Flagfalse  
Document Annual Reporttrue  
Document Transition Reportfalse  
Document Period End DateMar. 31, 2022  
Document Fiscal Period FocusFY  
Document Fiscal Year Focus2022  
Current Fiscal Year End Date--03-31  
Entity File Number333-156091  
Entity Registrant NameAlterola Biotech, Inc.  
Entity Central Index Key0001442999  
Entity Tax Identification Number82-1317032  
Entity Incorporation, State or Country CodeNV  
Entity Address, Address Line One47 Hamilton Squar  
Entity Address, City or TownBirkenhead Merseyside  
Entity Address, CountryGB  
Entity Address, Postal Zip CodeCH415AR  
City Area Code151  
Local Phone Number601 9477  
Entity Well-known Seasoned IssuerNo  
Entity Voluntary FilersNo  
Entity Current Reporting StatusYes  
Entity Interactive Data CurrentYes  
Entity Filer CategoryNon-accelerated Filer  
Entity Small Businesstrue  
Entity Emerging Growth Companyfalse  
Entity Shell Companyfalse  
Entity Public Float  $ 163,675,200
Entity Common Stock, Shares Outstanding 807,047,948 
Auditor NameGries & Associates, LLC  
Auditor LocationDenver, Colorado 80246  
Auditor Firm ID6778  
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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

Annual Report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
   
  For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022
   
Transition Report pursuant to 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
   
  Commission File Number: 333-156091

  

Alterola Biotech, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada 82-1317032
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization) (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
   
47 Hamilton Square Birkenhead Merseyside United Kingdom

 

 CH415AR

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number: +44 151 601 9477

 

 

Securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:

 

Title of each class Name of each exchange on which registered
None Not applicable

 

Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act:

 

Title of each class

None

       
       

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [ ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes [ ] No [X]

 

Indicate by checkmark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the proceeding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes [X] No [ ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes [X] No [ ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or emerging growth company.

 

Large accelerated Filer Accelerated Filer
Non-accelerated Filer Smaller reporting company
  Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [ ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report. [ ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [ ] No [X]

 

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter. $163,675,200

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date: 807,047,948 shares as of May 31, 2022.

 

  

 

 

 

 TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
Page
PART I
 
Item 1. Business 3
Item 1A. Risk Factors 16
Item 2. Properties 30
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 30
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosure 30
 
PART II
 
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 31
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 33
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 33
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 34
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 35
Item 9. Changes In and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 36
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 36
Item 9B. Other Information 37
Item 9C Disclosure Regarding Foreign Jurisdictions that Prevent Inspections 37
 
PART III
 
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 38
Item 11. Executive Compensation 44
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 46
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 47
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services 47
     
PART IV
 
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules 48
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary 48

 

 2 

 

PART I

 

Item 1. Business

 

Overview

 

Our goal is to provide better medicines for patients across the globe. We believe in harnessing the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids and cannabinoid- like compounds, which can bring valuable treatments to seriously ill patients. Rather than just focusing on one method of identifying, researching and developing such medicines, we are interested in developing new medicines from all sources including botanical, traditional chemical synthesis and biosynthetic methodologies.

 

On May 28, 2021, we acquired ABTI Pharma Limited, a company registered in England and Wales (“ABTI Pharma”), with the purchase of all of its capital stock in exchange for 600,000,000 shares of our common stock pro rata to the ABTI Pharma shareholders.

 

As a result of the acquisition, we are a pharmaceutical company working with cannabinoid and cannabinoid like molecules. We have three areas of focus:

 

1) Development of regulated pharmaceuticals (human and animal health) and regulated food products. This has been achieved via the strategic acquisition of Phytotherapeutix Ltd.

 

2) Production of low cost of goods Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) and food-grade ingredients (supported by the strategic acquisition of Ferven Ltd), and

 

3) Formulation, and drug delivery, providing improved bioavailability, solubility and stability (supported by the exclusive licensing of IP and technology from Nano4M Ltd).

 

Phytotherapeutix Ltd, a subsidiary of ABTI Pharma, has generated a number of molecules with patents pending, some of which have demonstrable pharmacological activity, similar to that of CBD. This means that some of these molecules are anticipated to have a similar market potential to CBD across a range of therapeutic areas.

 

Ferven Ltd, another subsidiary of ABTI Pharma, is looking to produce cannabinoids by fermentation. The exclusively licensed organism has the potential to be genetically modified to produce multiple cannabinoids at an anticipated very low cost of goods. It is anticipated that the selected genetically modified organisms will grow very quickly, which in turn, reduces the cost of production.

 

Nano4M Ltd is a company which has exclusively licensed its nano-formulation patents and know-how to ABTI Pharma Ltd.

  

As a result of the acquisition of assets and intellectual property from C2 Wellness Corp. on December 02, 2021, Alterola now has the following assets and intellectual property:

 

  Novel cannabinoid molecules and their associated intellectual property;
  Novel cannabinoid pro-drugs, and their associated intellectual property;
  Novel proprietary cannabinoid formulations, designed to target lymphatic delivery, and their associated intellectual property;
  Novel proprietary nano-encapsulated cannabinoid formulations, in self dissolving polymers, and their associated intellectual property; and
  Cannabinoids and cannabinoid pro-drug formulations for topical ocular delivery, and their associated intellectual property.

 

 3 

 

Additionally, we may consider entering into Joint Venture Partnerships, or acquire companies with complimentary portfolios or enter into Licensing Agreements to enhance the product portfolio. These are strategies the Company may implement and any such opportunities will be assessed on a case by case basis and on their merit at the time.

 

Alterola and ABTI Pharma management has extensive proven experience, know-how and connections in the cannabinoid medicines sector, and is looking to utilize this knowledge and experience for the development of such medicines from existing cannabinoids and cannabinoid-like molecules.

 

Our address is 47 Hamilton Square Birkenhead Merseyside CH41 5AR United Kingdom. Our telephone number is +44 151 601 9477. Our website is www.alterolabio.com. The company has a fully operational US$ and a £ sterling bank account in the United Kingdom with the HSBC Group.

 

We do not incorporate the information on or accessible through our websites into this annual report on Form 10-K, and you should not consider any information on, or that can be accessed through, our websites a part of this annual report on Form 10-K.

 

Competition

 

Pharmaceutical Sector

 

The cannabinoid-based and cannabinoid-like pharmaceutical medicine research and development sector is and will likely remain competitive. In general, the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries are characterized by rapidly advancing technologies, intense competition, and a strong emphasis on proprietary drugs / medicines.

 

We expect that Alterola will be required to compete with a variety of multinational pharmaceutical companies and specialized biotechnology companies, as well as drugs and processes being developed at universities and other research institutions. Our competitors may develop or may already have developed drugs comparable or competitive with our pipeline drug candidates. Competitive therapeutic treatments for diseases, disorders and medical conditions that are included in our pipeline development projects have already been approved by the pharmaceutical regulatory bodies around the world (e.g. FDA, EMA etc.) and used / prescribed by the medical community and any new treatments that may enter the market would face fierce competition.

 

We are aware of a number of companies that are engaged in cannabinoid-based drug / medicine development. In addition, several other U.S.-based companies are in early stage discovery and preclinical development utilizing synthetic and/or plant- derived cannabinoids such as CBD and/or THC.

 

Non-Pharmaceutical Sector

 

Due to Federal regulation, it is not currently possible to sell THC or CBD-containing products for non- pharmaceutical use (e.g., as food ingredients or dietary supplements) in the USA.

Although the Hemp Farming Act of 2018 effectively removed hemp (defined as cannabis with less than 0.3% THC) from Schedule I controlled substances, the FDA has yet to establish guidelines to legally sell hemp containing products as food ingredients or dietary supplements.

However, it is possible to develop cannabinoid- containing ingredients and products in the food sector in Europe through the Novel Food Approvals route.

  

Again this sector is and will likely remain competitive in territories where it is legal to develop and sell such products. Further it is also possible to develop cannabinoid-containing ingredients in the cosmetics sector.

  

 4 

 

For both pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical markets, established companies may have a competitive advantage due to their size and experiences, positive cash flows and institutional networks. Many of our pharma and non-pharma competitors may have significantly greater financial, technical and human resources than we do. Due to these factors, our competitors may have a range of competitive advantages and may obtain regulatory approval of their active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), or medicines; or food ingredients or food products or cosmetic ingredients before we are able to develop or commercialize our pharma or non-pharma active ingredients or products. Our competitors may also develop ingredients or products that are safer, more effective, more widely used and less expensive than ours.

 

Furthermore, some of these competitors may make acquisitions or establish collaborative relationships among themselves or with third parties to increase their ability to rapidly gain market share and/or increase their ingredient or product lines.

 

Mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology and non-pharmaceutical industries may result in even more resources being concentrated among a smaller number of competitors. Smaller and other early-stage companies, such as ours, may also prove to be significant competitors, particularly through collaborative arrangements with large and established companies. We aim to compete with large and small companies in recruiting and retaining qualified scientific, management and commercial personnel, and using our management knowhow and expertise in the sector to develop ingredients and products in a regulatory compliant manner, as well as licensing in or joint-venturing with a partner and / or in acquiring technologies complementary to our development programs.

 

Intellectual Property:

 

Through the acquisition of ABTI Pharma, Alterola has acquired ABTI Pharma’s internal and licensed IP portfolio, which includes:

 

  1) IP including patent applications pertaining to novel compounds for development of pharmaceutical drug candidates and their therapeutic use;

 

  2) IP (including organisms, protocols and knowhow) pertaining to low cost of goods production of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) and food-grade ingredients; and

 

  3) IP including granted patents pertaining to particle engineering technology, formulation, and drug delivery technologies, which will provide improved drug performance.

 

Through the acquisition of assets and intellectual property from C2 Wellness Corp. on December 02, 2021, Alterola now has the following assets and intellectual property:

 

  Novel cannabinoid molecules and their associated intellectual property;

  Novel cannabinoid pro-drugs, and their associated intellectual property;

 

  Novel proprietary cannabinoid formulations, designed to target lymphatic delivery, and their associated intellectual property;

 

  Novel proprietary nano-encapsulated cannabinoid formulations, in self dissolving polymers, and their associated intellectual property; and

 

  Cannabinoids and cannabinoid pro-drug formulations for topical ocular delivery, and their associated intellectual property.

 

 5 

 

In addition, Alterola, via ABTI Pharma Ltd, have in principle agreements to bring in additional complimentary technologies with incumbent IP.

  

Regulatory Matters Pharmaceuticals USA

 

As a development stage company that intends to have its pipeline drug candidates approved in the U.S., we are subject to extensive regulation by regulatory agencies. The U.S. Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and its implementing regulations set forth, among other things, requirements for the research, testing, development, manufacture, quality control, safety, effectiveness, approval, labeling, storage, record keeping, reporting, distribution, import, export, advertising and promotion of our drugs (medicines). Generally, our activities in other countries will be subject to regulations that are similar in nature and scope as those in the United States, although there can be important differences. Additionally, some significant aspects of regulation in the European Union are addressed in a centralized way through the European Medicines Agency (“EMA”) and the European Commission, but country- specific regulation remains essential in many respects. The process of obtaining regulatory marketing approvals and the subsequent compliance with appropriate federal, state, local and foreign statutes and regulations require the expenditure of substantial time and financial resources and we may not be successful.

 

Given that the active ingredients present in our APIs, food ingredients, and cosmetic ingredients are in some cases considered to be controlled substances, in certain jurisdictions / territories, there are additional regulations which are applicable to the research, development, import, receipt, possession, storage, preparation, extraction, synthesis, biosynthesis, manufacture, processing, analysis, release, formulation, dispensing, packaging and labelling, import/export, transport, commercialization, advertising and supply / distribution of Controlled Substances. This means that some of Alterola’s compounds may need to be compliant with competent authorities such as the DEA (USA), The Home Office (UK), and the corresponding authorities in each country.

 

We intend to conduct some of our research and development relating to our drug candidates in the United States, at which time, our research and development, future manufacturing, distribution, and sale of our drugs will become subject to the United States Federal Controlled Substances Act of 1970 and regulations promulgated thereunder.

 

While cannabis containing greater than 0.3% THC is a Schedule I controlled substance, drugs approved for medical use in the United States that contain cannabis or cannabis extracts must be placed in Schedules II-V or de-scheduled, since approval by the FDA satisfies the “accepted medical use” requirement. If any of our cannabis-derived pipeline drug candidates will receive approval by the FDA, it must be listed by the DEA as an appropriately scheduled controlled substance or de-scheduled to be allowed for commercialization. Because hemp (cannabis containing not more than .3% THC) and its derivatives were recently de-scheduled, the development of these compounds would follow the same process of other APIs.

 

Consequently, the manufacture, importation, exportation, domestic distribution, storage, sale, and legitimate use of some of our future ingredients and / or drugs may be subject to a significant degree of regulation by the DEA. In addition, individual states in the United States have also established controlled substance laws and regulations. Though state-controlled substances laws often mirror federal law, because the states are separate jurisdictions, they may separately schedule our ingredients and / or drugs.

 

Europe

 

It is the company’s intention have its ingredients and pipeline drug candidates approved in countries in addition to the USA and hence we are subject to extensive regulation by other international regulatory agencies, and the applicable local laws and regulations.

 

Similarly to the U.S. Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act in the USA and its implementing regulations, there are similar laws and regulations in Europe for the research, testing, development, manufacture, quality control, safety, effectiveness, approval, labeling, storage, record keeping, reporting, distribution, import, export, advertising, and promotion of our drugs (medicines). Again, our activities in Europe will be subject to regulations that are similar in nature and scope as those in the United States, although there can be important differences.

  

 6 

 

Our pipeline candidates may be developed or approved through the Centralized Procedure or Decentralized Procedure through the or through the Mutual Recognition Procedure (MRP) through the European Medicines Agency (“EMA”) and the European Commission; however it should be noted that country-specific regulation remains essential in many respects. The process of obtaining regulatory marketing approvals and the subsequent compliance with the appropriate national, federal, state, local and foreign statutes and regulations require the expenditure of substantial time and financial resources and we may not be successful.

 

Again, given that the active ingredients present in our APIs, food ingredients and cosmetic ingredients are in some countries are considered to be controlled substances in certain European jurisdictions / territories, there are additional regulations which are applicable to the research, development, import, receipt, possession, storage, preparation, extraction, synthesis, biosynthesis, manufacture, processing, analysis, release, formulation, dispensing, packaging and labelling, import/export, transport, commercialization, advertising and supply / distribution of Controlled Substances. This means that Alterola needs to be compliant with each competent authority in each European country as applicable.

 

Japan

 

It is the company’s intention have its pipeline drug candidates in due course approved in Japan and hence we are subject to extensive regulation by the pharmaceutical regulatory authority of Japan: the Pharmaceutical and Food Safety Bureau (PFSB) of the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW), and the Japanese applicable local laws and regulations.

 

Japan has its own laws and regulations for the research, testing, development, manufacture, quality control, safety, effectiveness, approval, labeling, storage, record keeping, reporting, distribution, import, export, advertising and promotion of our drugs (medicines).

 

Again, given that the active ingredients present in our APIs, food ingredients and cosmetic ingredients are in some countries are considered to be controlled substances in Japan, there are additional regulations which are applicable to the research, development, import, receipt, possession, storage, preparation, extraction, synthesis, biosynthesis, manufacture, processing, analysis, release, formulation, dispensing, packaging and labelling, import/export, transport, commercialization, advertising and supply / distribution of Controlled Substances. This means that Alterola needs to be compliant with the Japanese competent authority requirements.

 

The process of obtaining regulatory marketing approvals and the subsequent compliance with the appropriate national and local statutes and regulations of Japan require the expenditure of substantial time and financial resources and we may not be successful.

 

Rest of the World

 

It is the company’s intention have its pipeline drug candidates in due course approved in other countries around the world (Rest of World) and hence we are subject to extensive regulation by the various national pharmaceutical regulatory authorities which govern the various countries, and the applicable local laws and regulations.

 

Different countries have different laws and regulations for the research, testing, development, manufacture, quality control, safety, effectiveness, approval, labeling, storage, record keeping, reporting, distribution, import, export, advertising, and promotion of our drugs (medicines).

 

Again, given that the active ingredients present in our APIs, food ingredients and cosmetic ingredients are in some countries are considered to be controlled substances in some countries, there are additional regulations which are applicable to the research, development, import, receipt, possession, storage, preparation, extraction, synthesis, biosynthesis, manufacture, processing, analysis, release, formulation, dispensing, packaging and labelling, import/export, transport, commercialization, advertising, and supply / distribution of Controlled Substances. This means that Alterola needs to be compliant with each competent authority in each country as applicable.

 

 7 

 

The process of obtaining regulatory marketing approvals and the subsequent compliance with the appropriate national, federal, state, local and foreign statutes and regulations of other countries (ex-US, Europe and Japan) require the expenditure of substantial time and financial resources and we may not be successful.

  

The Regulatory Process for the approval of New Medicines

 

The Company operates in a highly controlled new drugs / medicines regulatory environment. Strict regulations establish requirements relating to demonstration of quality, safety and efficacy of a medicine. Regulations also cover preclinical and clinical research and development, manufacturing and reporting procedures, both pre- and post- approval. Failure to comply with regulations can result in stringent sanctions, including product recalls, withdrawal of approvals, seizure of products and criminal prosecution. Further, many countries have stringent regulations relating to the possession and use of cannabis or cannabinoid or cannabis-based medicines or medicines containing cannabinoid-like compounds.

 

Before obtaining regulatory approvals for the commercial sale of our future drug candidates, we must demonstrate that the proposed medicine demonstrates quality, safety, and efficacy. From a quality perspective this is done through demonstrating appropriate chemistry and manufacturing controls (CMC), and from a safety and efficacy perspective, this is done through demonstrating that our drug candidates are safe and effective in preclinical studies and clinical trials. Historically, the results from preclinical studies and early clinical trials often have not accurately predicted results of later clinical trials. In addition, many pharmaceuticals have shown promising results in clinical trials but subsequently failed to establish sufficient safety and efficacy results to obtain necessary regulatory approvals.

 

We expect to incur substantial expense for, and devote a significant amount of time to, the development of quality ingredients and products as well as preclinical studies and clinical trials. Many factors can delay the commencement and rate of completion of clinical trials, including the inability to recruit patients at the expected rate, the inability to follow patients adequately after treatment, the failure to manufacture sufficient quantities of materials used for clinical trials, and the emergence of unforeseen safety issues and governmental and regulatory delays. If a drug candidate fails to demonstrate safety and efficacy in clinical trials, this failure may delay development of other drug candidates and hinder our ability to develop and / or conduct related preclinical studies and clinical trials. Additionally, if we have pipeline candidate failures, we may also be expected to experience challenges, delays or even the inability to obtain additional financing at acceptable terms and conditions to develop these or other drug candidates.

 

Governmental authorities in all major markets require that a new drug be approved or exempted from approval by the appropriate regulatory authorities before it is marketed, and have established high standards for technical appraisal, which can result in an expensive and lengthy approval process. The time to obtain approval of a new medicine or indication varies by country and some drugs are never approved. The lengthy process of conducting new product or formulation development, preclinical studies and clinical trials, seeking approval and the subsequent compliance with applicable statutes and regulations, if approval is obtained, are very costly and require the expenditure of substantial resources.

 

United States

 

In the United States, the Public Health Service Act and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as amended, and the regulations promulgated thereunder, and other federal and state statutes and regulations govern, among other things, the safety and effectiveness standards for our drugs and the raw materials and components used in the production of, testing, manufacture, labeling, storage, record keeping, approval, distribution, advertising, and promotion of drug candidates on a product-by-product basis.

  

Preclinical tests include in vitro and in vivo evaluation of the drug candidate, including animal studies to assess potential safety and efficacy. Certain preclinical tests must be conducted in compliance with good laboratory practice regulations. Violations of these regulations can, in some cases, lead to invalidation of the studies, requiring them to be replicated. In addition, non-clinical studies (Chemistry and Manufacturing Controls, CMC) are undertaken to evaluate a new drug’s chemistry, and to determine, amongst other things, the active ingredients’ and finished product formulation’s stability and batch-to-batch reproducibility.

 

 8 

 

After laboratory analysis and preclinical testing, a Sponsor files an Investigational New Drug Application, or IND, to begin clinical development (clinical trials in humans). Typically, a manufacturer conducts a three-phase human clinical development program which itself is subject to numerous laws and regulatory requirements, including adequate monitoring, reporting, record keeping and informed consent. In Phase I, small clinical trials are conducted to determine the safety and tolerability of drug candidates. In Phase II, clinical trials are conducted to assess safety and gain preliminary evidence of the efficacy of drug candidates, and to determine appropriate dose ranges in patients with the target indication. In Phase III, clinical trials are conducted in appropriate patient populations to provide sufficient data for the statistically valid evidence of safety and efficacy. The time and expense that will be required for us to perform this clinical development can vary and is substantial. We cannot be certain that we will successfully complete Phase I, Phase II or Phase III clinical trials within any specific period, if at all. Furthermore, the FDA, the IRB are responsible for approving and monitoring the clinical trials at a given site, the Data Safety Monitoring Board, where one is used, or we may suspend the clinical trials at any time on various grounds, including a finding that subjects or patients are exposed to unacceptable health risk. Given that a number of our clinical trials are likely to be performed using drug candidates containing controlled substances, there is the added requirement for compliance with DEA regulations (or equivalent competent authority in ex-US countries where the preclinical studies and clinical trials may be conducted). DEA requirements for State and Federal DEA Registration for receipt, storage, and dispensing of controlled substances vary from state to state and the DEA Registration process can be lengthy and requirement multiple site visits by DEA personnel. This is further complicated if the controlled substance needs temperature regulation as well as controlled access / storage. Failure to gain or delay to gaining the necessary DEA registrations at one or more non-clinical (CMC), laboratory or manufacturing or packaging or labelling sites, preclinical study sites, analytical laboratories or clinical trial sites may delay the delivery of materials to key stakeholders. For example, delay of delivery of investigational product to a clinical trial site, may ultimately delay the initiation, conduct or completion of clinical trials critical for the approval of the product. These failures or delays may delay also the development of other drug candidates and hinder our ability to develop and / or conduct related preclinical studies and clinical trials. Additionally, if we have failures or delays in DEA registrations in pivotal or critical programs, we may also be expected to experience challenges, delays or even the inability to obtain additional financing at acceptable terms and conditions to develop these or other drug candidates.

 

If the clinical data from these clinical trials (Phases I, II and III) are deemed to support the safety and effectiveness of the drug candidate for its intended use, and the preclinical and quality data are also acceptable, then we may proceed to seek to file with the FDA, a New Drug Application, or NDA, with the US FDA seeking approval to market a new drug for one or more specified intended uses. We have not completed our non-clinical (CMC) studies or preclinical studies or clinical trials for any candidate drug for any intended use and therefore, we cannot ascertain whether the clinical data will support and justify filing an NDA. Nevertheless, if and when we are able to ascertain that the clinical data supports and justifies filing an NDA, we intend to make such appropriate filing.

 

The purpose of the NDA is to provide the FDA with sufficient information so that it can assess whether the candidate drug has a positive benefit / risk profile and whether it should approve the drug candidate for marketing for specific intended uses.

 

The fact that the FDA has previously granted a candidate drug an IND, or designated a drug as an orphan drug for a specific intended use, or granted it Breakthrough status, or fast track status or an expedited review does not mean that the drug has been approved for marketing. Only after an NDA has been approved by the FDA is marketing allowed. A request for orphan drug status (orphan drug designation) must be filed before the NDA is filed. The orphan drug designation, though, provides certain benefits, including a seven-year period of market exclusivity subject to certain exceptions.

 

The NDA normally includes, but is not limited to, sections describing the quality safety and efficacy of the medicine. The quality section describes the chemistry, manufacturing, and controls, the preclinical (non-clinical) section describes the non-clinical pharmacology, safety pharmacology, drug metabolism, and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) and toxicology, human pharmacokinetics and bioavailability, and the clinical section describes the efficacy and safety results of the clinical trials, and the proposed labeling which contains, among other things, the intended uses of the candidate drug. Importantly for drug candidates containing controlled substances, studies investigating the medicine’s potential for abuse are also undertaken and reported.

 

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We cannot take any action to market any new drug or biologic drug in the United States until our appropriate marketing application has been approved by the FDA. The FDA has substantial discretion over the approval process and may disagree with our interpretation of the data submitted. The process may be significantly extended by requests for additional information or clarification regarding information already provided. As part of this review, the FDA may refer the application to an appropriate advisory committee, typically a panel of clinicians. Satisfaction of these and other regulatory requirements typically takes several years, and the actual time required may vary substantially based upon the type, complexity and novelty of the drug. Government regulation may delay or prevent marketing of potential drugs for a considerable period and impose costly procedures on our activities. We cannot be certain that the FDA or other regulatory agencies will approve any of our drugs on a timely basis, if at all. Success in preclinical or early stage clinical trials does not assure success in later-stage clinical trials. Even if a drug receives regulatory approval, the approval may be significantly limited to specific indications or uses and these limitations may adversely affect the commercial viability of the drug / medicine. Delays in obtaining, or failures to obtain regulatory approvals, would have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

Even after we obtain FDA approval, we may be required to conduct further studies which may be additional preclinical studies or clinical trials (e.g. Phase IV trials) and provide additional data on safety and effectiveness. We are also required to gain separate approval for the use of an approved drug as a treatment for indications other than those initially approved. In addition, side effects or adverse events that are reported during clinical trials can delay, impede or prevent marketing approval. Similarly, adverse events that are reported after marketing approval can result in additional limitations being placed on the drug’s use and, potentially, withdrawal of the drug from the market. Any adverse event, either before or after marketing approval, can result in product liability claims against the company.

 

As an alternate path for FDA approval of new indications or new formulations of previously-approved drugs, a company may file a Section 505(b)(2) NDA, instead of a “stand-alone” or “full” NDA. Section 505(b)(2) of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act was enacted as part of the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984, otherwise known as the Hatch-Waxman Amendments. Section 505(b)(2) permits the submission of an NDA where at least some of the information required for approval comes from studies not conducted by or for the applicant and for which the applicant has not obtained a right of reference. Some examples of drugs that may be allowed to follow a 505(b)(2) path to approval are drugs that have a new dosage form, strength, route of administration, formulation or indication. The Hatch-Waxman Amendments permit the applicant to rely upon certain published nonclinical or clinical studies conducted for an approved drug or the FDA’s conclusions from prior review of such studies. The FDA may require companies to perform additional studies or measurements to support any changes from the approved drug. The FDA may then approve the new drug for all or some of the labeled indications for which the referenced listed drug has been approved, as well as for any new indication supported by the NDA. While references to nonclinical and clinical data not generated by the applicant or for which the applicant does not have a right of reference are allowed, all development, process, stability, qualification, and validation data related to the manufacturing and quality of the new drug must be included in an NDA submitted under Section 505(b)(2).

 

To the extent that the Section 505(b)(2) applicant is relying on the FDA’s conclusions regarding studies conducted for an already approved drug, the applicant is required to certify to the FDA concerning any patents listed for the approved drug in the FDA’s “Orange Book” publication. Specifically, the applicant must certify that: (i) the required patent information has not been filed; (ii) the listed patent has expired; (iii) the listed patent has not expired but will expire on a particular date and approval is sought after patent expiration; or (iv) the listed patent is invalid or will not be infringed by the new drug. The Section 505(b)(2) application also will not be approved until any non-patent exclusivity, such as exclusivity for obtaining approval of a new chemical entity, listed in the Orange Book for the reference drug has expired. Thus, the Section 505(b)(2) applicant may invest a significant amount of time and expense in the development of its drugs only to be subject to significant delay and patent litigation before its drugs may be commercialized.

 

In addition to regulating and auditing human clinical trials, the FDA regulates and inspects equipment, facilities, laboratories and processes used in the manufacturing and testing of such drugs prior to providing approval to market a drug.

  

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Orphan Drug Designation in the U.S.

 

Under the Orphan Drug Act, the FDA may grant orphan drug designation to a drug intended to treat a rare disease or condition, which is a disease or condition that affects fewer than 200,000 individuals in the United States. If the disease or condition affects more than 200,000 individuals in the United States, orphan drug designation may nevertheless be available if there is no reasonable expectation that the cost of developing and making the drug would be recovered from sales in the United States. In the United States, a drug that has received orphan drug designation is eligible for financial incentives, such as opportunities for grant funding towards clinical trial costs, tax credits for certain research and user fee waivers under certain circumstances. The Orphan Drug Act provides that, if a designated drug is approved for the rare disease or condition for which it was designated, the approved drug will be granted seven years of orphan drug exclusivity, which means the FDA generally will not approve any other application for a drug containing the same active moiety for the same indication for a period of seven years, except in limited circumstances, such as a showing of clinical superiority over the drug with orphan drug exclusivity. Orphan drug exclusivity does not prevent the FDA from approving a different drug for the same disease or condition, or the same drug for a different disease or condition.

 

Orphan drug designation must be requested before submission of an application for marketing approval. Products that qualify for orphan designation may also qualify for other FDA programs that are intended to expedite the development and approval process and, as a practical matter, clinical trials for orphan products may be smaller, simply because of the smaller patient population. Nonetheless, the same approval standards apply to orphan- designated products as for other drugs. Orphan drug designation does not convey any advantage in, or shorten the duration of, the regulatory review and approval process.

 

Europe

 

The drug development process in Europe is essentially the same as that required to develop drugs in an acceptable manner in the USA, in that a drug must meet the requirements for quality safety and efficacy. The international regulators (including the FDA) have a system which allows them to mutually recognize the standards of drug development. This is called the ICH standard (international Conference on Harmonization). This avoids the need for pharmaceutical companies to repeat their costly drug development programs for different jurisdictions / international territories. There are nuances between the requirements of the USA, Europe and Japan – but the standards to which development programs must be conducted are essentially the same.

  

There are essentially three mechanisms for obtaining a marketing authorization (MA) in Europe

 

  1) the Centralized Procedure

 

  2) the De-Centralized Procedure

 

  3) the Mutual Recognition Procedure

 

Centralized Procedure (CP)

 

The advantage of the centralized procedure is that it requires a single application which, if successful, results in a single marketing authorization with the same product information available in all EU languages and valid in all EU member states / countries, as well as Iceland, Liechtenstein, and Norway. The scientific assessment of the marketing authorization application is carried out by the Committee on Human Medicinal Products (CHMP). The scientific review process consists of alternating periods of active evaluation and periods during which the clock is stopped in order to give the applicant time to resolve any issues identified during the evaluation. In total, the duration of the process is up to 210 ‘active’ days before an opinion is issued by the CHMP. Once an opinion has been given, it is forwarded to the European Commission which then has 67 days to issue a legally binding decision on the marketing authorization.

  

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Once a marketing authorization has been granted, the applicant can start to market the medicine in any EU Member State of its choice. However, in practice before a medicine is marketed, it will be subject to pricing negotiations and a review of its cost-effectiveness. This is carried out at national level by Member States to determine reimbursement criteria. Initially, the centralized procedure was mandatory only for biotechnology medicines, as was the case with the previous concertation procedure. Over time, however, the mandatory scope of the centralized procedure has been gradually expanded and by 2005, it included orphan medicines (medicines for rare diseases) as well as human medicines that contain a new active substance (not previously authorized in the Union before 20 November 2005) and that are intended for the treatment of AIDS, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, auto-immune and other immune dysfunctions, and viral diseases. In 2009, the centralized procedure also became mandatory for advanced therapy medicines. The centralized procedure is also optional for other medicines that contain a new active substance not authorized in the Union before 20 November 2005, and for products which are considered to be a significant therapeutic, scientific, or technical innovation, or for which an EU-wide authorization is considered to be in the interests of public health.

 

The Decentralized Procedure (DCP)

 

In the decentralized procedure, the applicant chooses one country as the reference Member State when making its application for marketing authorization. The chosen reference Member State then prepares a draft assessment report that is submitted to the other Member States where approval is sought for their simultaneous consideration and approval. In allowing the other Member States access to this assessment at an early stage, any issues and concerns can be dealt with quickly without delay, which sometimes is known to occur with the mutual recognition procedure (MRP, see below). Compared with the MRP, the decentralized procedure has the advantage that the marketing authorization in all chosen Member States is received simultaneously, enabling simultaneous marketing of the medicine and reducing the administrative and regulatory burden.

 

The Mutual Recognition Procedure (MRP)

 

The mutual recognition procedure has been in place since 1995 and evolved from the multi-state licensing procedure. The applicant must initially receive national approval in one EU Member State, referred to as the “Reference Member State” (RMS) and then seek approval for the medicine in other, so-called ‘Concerned Member States’ in a second step based on the assessment done in the RMS. This process has significant differences from the former multi-state licensing procedure, notably the requirement that disagreements between Member States must now be resolved at EU level. Disagreements are handled by the Co-ordination Group for Mutual Recognition and Decentralized Procedures – Human (CMDh), a body representing Member States, which is responsible for any questions in two or more Member States relating to the Marketing Authorization (MA) of a medicinal product approved through the mutual recognition or the decentralized procedure. If there is a disagreement between Member States on grounds of a potential serious risk to public health, the CMDh considers the matter in order to reach an agreement within 60 days. If resolution is not possible by the CMDh, the procedure is referred to the CHMP in a procedure called a referral. The CHMP will then carry out a scientific assessment of the relevant medicine on behalf of the EU. In contrast to the previous (multi-state) procedure, the outcome of the CHMP is binding on the Member States involved once it has been adopted by the European Commission. The timelines for assessment by CHMP is 60 days. Since the introduction of the decentralized procedure, the mutual recognition procedure is used for extending existing marketing authorizations to other countries.

 

There are other nuances to Marketing Authorization approval of medicines in Europe compared with the FDA. For example, a Pediatric Investigation Plan (PIP) is a development plan aimed at ensuring that the necessary data are obtained through studies in children, to support the authorization of a medicine for children. All applications for marketing authorization for new medicines have to include the results of studies as described in an agreed PIP, unless the medicine is exempt because of a deferral or waiver.

 

Orphan Drug Designation in Europe

 

In the European Union, it is also possible to obtain an orphan drug designation for a pipeline drug candidate. This also entitles a company to financial incentives such as a reduction of fees or fee waivers and ten years of market exclusivity following drug approval. This period may be reduced to six years if the orphan drug designation criteria are no longer met, including where it is shown that the drug is sufficiently profitable not to justify maintenance of market exclusivity. The definition of what qualifies as a rare disease in Europe is slightly different to the USA definition.

  

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To qualify for orphan designation in Europe, a medicine must meet a number of criteria:

 

  it must be intended for the treatment, prevention or diagnosis of a disease that is life-threatening or chronically debilitating;

 

  the prevalence of the condition in the EU must not be more than 5 in 10,000 or it must be unlikely that marketing of the medicine would generate sufficient returns to justify the investment needed for its development;

 

  no satisfactory method of diagnosis, prevention or treatment of the condition concerned can be authorized, or, if such a method exists, the medicine must be of significant benefit to those affected by the condition.

 

As with the USA, European Orphan drug designation does not convey any advantage in, or shorten the duration of, the regulatory review and approval process.

 

In the same way that there is no guarantee than any medicines developed by Alterola will be approved in the USA, there is similarly no guarantee that any of Alterola’s medicines will be approved in Europe.

 

Non-Pharmaceuticals

 

Food, Drinks & Dietary Supplements

 

USA

 

According to the FDA, it is currently illegal to market THC or CBD by adding it to a food or labeling it as a dietary supplement. Based on available evidence, FDA has concluded that THC and CBD products are excluded from the dietary supplement definition under section 201(ff)(3)(B) of the FD&C Act [21 U.S.C. § 321(ff)(3)(B)]. Under that provision, if a substance (such as THC or CBD) is an active ingredient in a drug product that has been approved under section 505 of the FD&C Act [21 U.S.C. § 355], or has been authorized for investigation as a new drug for which substantial clinical investigations have been instituted and for which the existence of such investigations has been made public, then products containing that substance are excluded from the definition of a dietary supplement. FDA considers a substance to be "authorized for investigation as a new drug" if it is the subject of an Investigational New Drug application (IND) that has gone into effect. Under FDA’s regulations (21 CFR 312.2), unless a clinical investigation meets the limited criteria in that regulation, an IND is required for all clinical investigations of products that are subject to section 505 of the FD&C Act.

 

There is an exception to section 201(ff)(3)(B) if the substance was "marketed as" a dietary supplement or as a conventional food before the drug was approved or before the new drug investigations were authorized, as applicable. However, based on available evidence, FDA has concluded that this is not the case for THC or CBD. FDA is not aware of any evidence that would call into question its current conclusions that THC and CBD products are excluded from the dietary supplement definition under section 201(ff)(3)(B) of the FD&C Act. FDA continues to review information that is submitted to FDA on this issue, but to date this has not caused FDA to change their conclusions.

 

Given the legal / regulatory situation at present in the USA, at this time, Alterola will not be looking to commercialize cannabinoid-containing ingredients or products in the food, drinks or dietary supplements sector in the USA.

 

Europe - Novel Food Application (Europe)

 

Under EU regulations, any food that was not consumed “significantly” prior to May 1997 is considered to be a “Novel Food”. The category covers new foods, food from new sources, new substances used in food as well as new ways and technologies for producing food. There is a specific procedure for gaining a Novel Food Approval in Europe.

 

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The novel food status of CBD extracts was confirmed in January 2019. This means that applicants need to apply for authorization of CBD extracts and isolates using the procedure for full applications (rather than a traditional food) outlined in the European Food Standards Agency (EFSA) guidance.

  

In general, the process is as follows: (1) The applicant submits a Novel Food application; (2) the application is reviewed and if compliant validated by the European Commission to see if it falls within the scope of Novel Food Regulation (EU) 2015 / 2283 (EC validity check); (3) the European Food Standards Agency (EFSA) undertakes a suitability check to see if the application fulfils the requirements of article 10(2) of (EU) 2015 / 2283; (4) EFSA reviews and performs a risk assessment and gives an opinion within 9 months of receipt of a valid application (5) the EC drafts an implementing act authorizing the placement on the market of a Novel Food and updating the EU list, within 7 months of the EFSA opinion. This process can take approximately 18 months from receipt of a valid application, although it can take longer in some cases.

 

Given the legal and regulated process in Europe, Alterola intends to submit Novel Food applications for cannabinoid-containing ingredients and / or products in the food, drinks or dietary supplements sector in Europe, where it is legal to do so. It may be several years before we can obtain approval and commence commercialization of such ingredients, if ever. 

 

Rest of The World (RoW)

 

Given the varying legal and regulated processes for regulatory approval of for cannabinoid-containing ingredients and / or products in the food, drinks or dietary supplements sector in countries outside of the USA and Europe, Alterola will consider gaining such approval in countries / territories where it is legal to do so. These will be considered on a case-by-case basis as appropriate. It may be several years before we can obtain approval and commence commercialization of such ingredients, if ever.

 

Cosmetics

 

USA

 

A cosmetic is defined in the Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act 201(i) as "(1) articles intended to be rubbed, poured, sprinkled, or sprayed on, introduced into, or otherwise applied to the human body or any part thereof for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance, and (2) articles intended for use as a component of any such articles; except that such term shall not include soap."

 

Under the FD&C Act, cosmetic products and ingredients are not subject to premarket approval by FDA, except for most color additives. Certain cosmetic ingredients are prohibited or restricted by regulation, but currently that is not the case for any cannabis or cannabis-derived ingredients. Ingredients not specifically addressed by regulation must nonetheless comply with all applicable requirements, and no ingredient – including a cannabis or cannabis-derived ingredient – cannot be used in a cosmetic if it causes the product to be adulterated or misbranded in any way. A cosmetic generally is adulterated if it bears or contains any poisonous or deleterious substance which may render it injurious to users under the conditions of use prescribed in the labeling, or under such conditions of use as are customary or usual (section 601(a) of the FD&C Act [21 U.S.C. § 361(a)]).

 

Alterola may choose to supply active ingredient(s) to cosmetic companies within the USA where it is legal to do so. However, although the company is focused upon producing low cost of goods ingredients, there is no guarantee that the company will be able to produce cosmetic ingredients at the purity required of at a cost of goods which will enable the company to compete within other suppliers of cosmetic ingredients to cosmetic companies. Alterola has no intention in producing its own cosmetic products. It may be several years before we can obtain approval and commence commercialization of such ingredients, if ever.

 

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Europe

 

The use of CBD in cosmetics is harmonized within the European Cosmetic Regulation 1223/2009, under entry 306 ‘Narcotics, natural and synthetic’ of Annex II, and has been for some time. The regulation prohibits use of cannabis and cannabis extracts in cosmetics, as they are controlled substances in Schedule I of the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs. However, CBD specifically is not referenced in this convention. At the beginning of 2019, the European Commission (EC) added two entries to its database of cosmetics ingredients for CBD to differentiate between: CBD “derived from extract or tincture or resin of cannabis” and CBD “synthetically produced”. Both entries contain the same text: “Cannabidiol (CBD) as such, irrespective of its source, is not listed in the Schedules of the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs. However, it shall be prohibited from use in cosmetic products (II/306) if it is prepared as an extract or tincture or resin of Cannabis in accordance with the Single Convention. Please note that national legislations on controlled substances may also apply.” Essentially, use of naturally-derived CBD from cannabis plants is prohibited in the EU but use of hemp-derived or synthetically-produced CBD is allowed. However, the Single Convention’s banned ingredients list does not include cannabis seeds or leaves without tops, meaning use of CBD derived from these parts of the cannabis plant is not currently prohibited.

  

It is Alterola’s intention to supply active ingredient(s) to cosmetic companies within the EU where it is legal to do so. However, although the company is focused upon producing low cost of goods ingredients, there is no guarantee that the company will be able to produce cosmetic ingredients at the purity required of at a cost of goods which will enable the company to compete within other suppliers of cosmetic ingredients to cosmetic companies. Alterola has no intention in producing its own cosmetic products. It may be several years before we can obtain approval and commence commercialization of such ingredients, if ever.

 

Rest of the World

 

Given the varying legal and regulated processes for regulatory approval of for cannabinoid-containing ingredients and / or products in the cosmetic sector in countries outside of the USA and Europe, Alterola will consider gaining such approval in countries / territories where it is legal to do so. These will be considered on a case-by-case basis as appropriate.

 

Employees

 

At present, there is one active employee other than our officers and directors. The officers, directors and senior managers oversee all responsibilities in corporate administration, business development and research and development. If finances permit, however, we intend to expand our current management to retain skilled directors, officers and employees with experience relevant to our business focus.

 

Property

 

We do not own any real property. We maintain our corporate offices at 47 Hamilton Square Birkenhead Merseyside CH41 5AR United Kingdom. One of the company directors has a beneficial ownership in the property, which is leased on “arm’s length” terms.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

From time to time, we may become party to various lawsuits, claims and other legal proceedings that arise in the ordinary course of our business. We are not currently a party, as plaintiff or defendant, to any legal proceedings that we believe to be material or which, individually or in the aggregate, would be expected to have a material effect on our business, financial condition or results of operation if determined adversely to us.

 

Smaller Reporting Company

 

The Company is a “smaller reporting company” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act. There are certain exemptions available to us as a smaller reporting company, including: (1) not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes Oxley Act; (2) scaled executive compensation disclosures; and (3) the requirement to provide only two years of audited financial statements, instead of three years. As long as we maintain our status as a “smaller reporting company”, these exemptions will continue to be available to us.

 

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

An investment in our securities involves a high degree of risk. In addition to the other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, prospective investors should carefully consider the following risks before investing in our securities. If any of the following risks actually occur, as well as other risks not currently known to us or that we currently consider immaterial, our business, operating results and financial condition could be materially adversely affected. As a result, the trading price of our common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment in our common stock. The risks discussed below also include forward-looking statements, and our actual results may differ substantially from those discussed in these forward-looking statements. See “Cautionary Note On Forward-Looking Statements” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. In assessing the risks below, you should also refer to the other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including the financial statements and the related notes, before deciding to purchase any of our securities.

 

Risk Related to Covid 19

 

Our business and future operations may be adversely affected by epidemics and pandemics, such as the recent COVID-19 outbreak.

 

We may face risks related to health epidemics and/or pandemics and/or other outbreaks of communicable diseases, which could result in a widespread health crisis that could adversely affect general commercial activity and the economies and financial markets of the world as a whole. For example, the outbreak of COVID-19, which began in China, has been declared by the World Health Organization to be a “pandemic,” has spread across the globe, including the United States of America. A health epidemic or pandemic or other outbreak of communicable diseases, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic, poses the risk that we, or potential business partners may be disrupted or prevented from conducting business activities for certain periods of time, the durations of which are uncertain, and may otherwise experience significant impairments of business activities, including due to, among other things, operational shutdowns or suspensions that may be requested or mandated by national or local governmental authorities or self-imposed by us, our users or other business partners. For example, due to COVID-19, we have been unable to travel across the relevant jurisdictions pertaining to our business and foresee this as an ongoing issue. While it is not possible at this time to estimate the full impact that COVID-19 could have on our business, potential users or other potential business partners, the continued spread of COVID-19, the measures taken by the local and federal government, actions taken to protect employees, and the impact of the pandemic on various business activities could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. 

 

 Risks Relating to Our Financial Condition

 

There are doubts about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

We have generated no revenue, and have an accumulated deficit of $7,970,510 through March 31, 2022. These factors raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

There can be no assurance that sufficient funds required during the next year or thereafter will be generated from operations or that funds will be available from external sources, such as debt or equity financings or other potential sources. The lack of additional capital resulting from the inability to generate cash flow from operations, or to raise capital from external sources would force us to substantially curtail or cease operations and would, therefore, have a material adverse effect on its business. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that any such required funds, if available, will be available on attractive terms or that they will not have a significant dilutive effect on our existing stockholders.

 

We seek to overcome the circumstances that impact our ability to remain a going concern through a combination of the growth of revenues, with interim cash flow deficiencies being addressed through additional equity and debt financing. We anticipate raising additional funds through public or private financing, strategic relationships or other arrangements in the near future to support its business operations; however, we may not have commitments from third parties for a sufficient amount of additional capital. We cannot be certain that any such financing will be available on acceptable terms, or at all, and our failure to raise capital when needed could limit our ability to continue operations. Our ability to obtain additional funding will determine the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Failure to secure additional financing in a timely manner and on favorable terms would have a material adverse effect on our financial performance, results of operations and stock price and require us to curtail or cease operations, sell off our assets, seek protection from our creditors through bankruptcy proceedings, or otherwise. Furthermore, additional equity financing may be dilutive to the holders of our common stock, and debt financing, if available, may involve restrictive covenants, and strategic relationships, if necessary, to raise additional funds, and may require that we relinquish valuable rights. 

 

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Because we have a limited operating history, you may not be able to accurately evaluate our operations.

 

We have had limited operations to date. Therefore, we have a limited operating history upon which to evaluate the merits of investing in our company. Potential investors should be aware of the difficulties normally encountered by new companies and the high rate of failure of such enterprises. The likelihood of success must be considered in light of the problems, expenses, difficulties, complications and delays encountered in connection with the operations that we plan to undertake. These potential problems include, but are not limited to, unanticipated problems relating to the ability to generate sufficient cash flow to operate our business, and additional costs and expenses that may exceed current estimates. We expect to continue to incur significant losses into the foreseeable future. We recognize that if the effectiveness of our business plan is not forthcoming, we will not be able to continue business operations. There is no history upon which to base any assumption as to the likelihood that we will prove successful, and it is doubtful that we will generate any operating revenues or ever achieve profitable operations. If we are unsuccessful in addressing these risks, our business will most likely fail.

 

We are dependent on outside financing for continuation of our operations.

 

Because we have generated no revenues and currently operate at a loss, we are completely dependent on the continued availability of financing in order to continue our business operations. There can be no assurance that financing sufficient to enable us to continue our operations will be available to us in the future.

 

We will need additional funds to complete further development of our business plan to achieve a sustainable level where ongoing operations can be funded out of revenues. We anticipate that we must raise $25,000,000 for our operations for the next 12 months, and $81,000,000 in total for our initial clinical development programs. We will require further funding to fully implement our business plan to its fullest potential and achieve our growth plans. There is no assurance that any additional financing will be available or if available, on terms that will be acceptable to us.

 

Our failure to obtain future financing or to produce levels of revenue to meet our financial needs could result in our inability to continue as a going concern and, as a result, our investors could lose their entire investment. 

 

Our operating results may fluctuate, which could have a negative impact on our ability to grow our client base, establish sustainable revenues and succeed overall.

 

Our results of operations may fluctuate as a result of a number of factors, some of which are beyond our control including but not limited to:

 

  general economic conditions in the geographies and industries where we sell our services and conduct operations; legislative policies where we sell our services and conduct operations;

 

  the budgetary constraints of our customers; seasonality;

 

  success of our strategic growth initiatives;

 

  costs associated with the launching or integration of new or acquired businesses; timing of new product introductions by us, our suppliers and our competitors; product and service mix, availability, utilization and pricing;

 

  the mix, by state and country, of our revenues, personnel and assets; movements in interest rates or tax rates; and

 

  changes in, and application of, accounting rules; changes in the regulations applicable to us; and litigation matters.

 

As a result of these factors, we may not succeed in our business and we could go out of business.

 

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As a growing company, we have yet to achieve a profit and may not achieve a profit in the near future, if at all.

 

We have not yet produced any revenues or profit and may not in the near future, if at all. We cannot be certain that we will be able to realize sufficient revenue to achieve profitability. Further, many of our competitors have a significantly larger industry presence and revenue stream but have yet to achieve profitability. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon raising capital from financing transactions, increasing revenue and keeping operating expenses below our revenue levels in order to achieve positive cash flows, none of which can be assured.

 

Risks Related with Management and Control Persons

 

We are dependent on the continued services of our key staff and if we fail to keep them or fail to attract and retain qualified senior executive and key technical personnel, our business will not be able to expand.

 

We are dependent on the continued availability of Timothy Rogers (Executive Chairman), Seamus McAuley (Chief Executive Officer, CEO), Colin Stott (Chief Operating Officer, COO), Dominic Schiller (Chief IP Officer), Hunter Land (VP Translational Research, USA) and Guy Webber (Preclinical Development Director), and the availability of new employees to implement our business plans. The market for skilled employees is highly competitive, especially for employees in our industry. Although we expect that our planned compensation programs will be intended to attract and retain the employees required for us to be successful, there can be no assurance that we will be able to retain the services of all our key employees or a sufficient number to execute our plans, nor can there be any assurance we will be able to continue to attract new employees as required.

 

Our lack of adequate D&O insurance may also make it difficult for us to retain and attract talented and skilled directors and officers.

 

In the future we may be subject to additional litigation, including potential class action and stockholder derivative actions. Risks associated with legal liability are difficult to assess and quantify, and their existence and magnitude can remain unknown for significant periods of time. To date, we have not obtained directors and officers liability (“D&O”) insurance. Without adequate D&O insurance, the amounts we would pay to indemnify our officers and directors should they be subject to legal action based on their service to the Company could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity. Furthermore, our lack of adequate D&O insurance may make it difficult for us to retain and attract talented and skilled directors and officers, which could adversely affect our business. 

 

Our personnel may voluntarily terminate their relationship with us at any time, and competition for qualified personnel is intense. The process of locating additional personnel with the combination of skills and attributes required to carry out our strategy could be lengthy, costly and disruptive.

 

If we lose the services of key personnel or fail to replace the services of key personnel who depart, we could experience a severe negative effect on our financial results and stock price. The loss of the services of any key personnel, marketing or other personnel or our failure to attract, integrate, motivate and retain additional key employees could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating and financial results and stock price.

  

Our officers and directors have substantial control over us and our policies and will be able to influence corporate matters.

 

Our officers and directors presently beneficially own more than 70% of our common stock. They are able to exercise significant influence over all matters requiring approval by our stockholders, including the election of directors, the approval of significant corporate transactions, and any change of control of our company. They could prevent transactions, which would be in the best interests of the other shareholders. Our officers and directors’ interests may not necessarily be in the best interests of the shareholders in general.

 

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The elimination of monetary liability against our directors, officers and employees under our Articles of Incorporation and the existence of indemnification rights to our directors, officers and employees may result in substantial expenditures by our Company and may discourage lawsuits against our directors, officers and employees.

 

Our Articles of Incorporation contain provisions that eliminate the liability of our directors for monetary damages to our Company and shareholders. Our bylaws also require us to indemnify our officers and directors. We may also have contractual indemnification obligations under our agreements with our directors, officers and employees. The foregoing indemnification obligations could result in our company incurring substantial expenditures to cover the cost of settlement or damage awards against directors, officers and employees that we may be unable to recoup. These provisions and resulting costs may also discourage our company from bringing a lawsuit against directors, officers and employees for breaches of their fiduciary duties, and may similarly discourage the filing of derivative litigation by our shareholders against our directors, officers and employees even though such actions, if successful, might otherwise benefit our Company and shareholders.

 

Our officers and directors have limited experience managing a public company.

 

Our officers and directors have limited experience managing a public company. Consequently, we may not be able to raise any funds or run our public company successfully. Our executive’s officers’ and directors’ lack of experience of managing a public company could cause you to lose some or all of your investment.

 

Risks Relating to our Common Stock

 

We will likely conduct further offerings of our equity securities in the future, in which case your proportionate interest may become diluted.

 

We will likely be required to conduct equity offerings in the future to finance our current projects or to finance subsequent projects that we decide to undertake. If our common stock shares are issued in return for additional funds, the price per share could be lower than that paid by our current shareholders. We anticipate continuing to rely on equity sales of our common stock shares in order to fund our business operations. If we issue additional common stock shares or securities convertible into shares of our common stock, your percentage interest in us could become diluted.

 

Our common stock price may be volatile and could fluctuate widely in price, which could result in substantial losses for investors.

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTC Markets under the symbol, “ABTI.” The market price of our common stock is likely to be highly volatile and could fluctuate widely in price in response to various factors, many of which are beyond our control, including:

 

  government regulation of our products and services;

 

  the establishment of partnerships with pharmaceutical, food, cosmetic research and development (R & D) and / or manufacturing companies;

 

  intellectual property disputes;

 

  additions or departures of key personnel;

 

  sales of our common stock

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  our ability to integrate operations, technology, products and services;

 

  our ability to execute our business plan;

 

  operating results below expectations;

 

  loss of any strategic relationship;

 

  industry developments;

 

  economic and other external factors; and

 

  period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

 

Because we have no revenues to date, you should consider any one of these factors to be material. Our stock price may fluctuate widely as a result of any of the above.

 

In addition, the securities markets have from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. These market fluctuations may also materially and adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

 

Our existing stockholders may experience significant dilution from the sale of our common stock pursuant to the EMC2 Purchase Agreement.

 

The sale of our common stock to EMC2 in accordance with the Purchase Agreement may have a dilutive impact on our shareholders. As a result, the market price of our common stock could decline. In addition, the lower our stock price is at the time we exercise our put options, the more shares of our common stock we will have to issue to EMC2 in order to exercise a put under the Purchase Agreement. If our stock price decreases, then our existing shareholders would experience greater dilution for any given dollar amount raised through the offering.

 

The perceived risk of dilution may cause our stockholders to sell their shares, which may cause a decline in the price of our common stock. Moreover, the perceived risk of dilution and the resulting downward pressure on our stock price could encourage investors to engage in short sales of our common stock. By increasing the number of shares offered for sale, material amounts of short selling could further contribute to progressive price declines in our common stock.

 

The issuance of shares pursuant to the EMC2 Purchase Agreement may have significant dilutive effect.

 

Depending on the number of shares we issue pursuant to the EMC2 Purchase Agreement, it could have a significant dilutive effect upon our existing shareholders. Although the number of shares that we may issue pursuant to the Purchase Agreement will vary based on our stock price (the higher our stock price, the less shares we have to issue), there may be a potential dilutive effect to our shareholders, based on different potential future stock prices, if the full amount of the Purchase Agreement is realized. Dilution is based upon common stock put to EMC2 and the stock price discounted to 91% of the lowest sales price on the purchase date.

 

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EMC2 will pay less than the then-prevailing market price of our common stock which could cause the price of our common stock to decline.

 

Our common stock to be issued under the EMC2 Purchase Agreement will be purchased at 91% of the lowest sales price on the purchase date. EMC2 has a financial incentive to sell our shares immediately upon receiving them to realize the profit between the discounted price and the market price. If EMC2 sells our shares, the price of our common stock may decrease. If our stock price decreases, EMC2 may have further incentive to sell such shares. Accordingly, the discounted sales price in the Purchase Agreement may cause the price of our common stock to decline.

 

We have never declared or paid any cash dividends or distributions on our capital stock. And we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future.

 

We have never declared or paid any cash dividends or distributions on our capital stock. We currently intend to retain our future earnings, if any, to support operations and to finance expansion and therefore we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future.

 

The declaration, payment and amount of any future dividends will be made at the discretion of the board of directors, and will depend upon, among other things, the results of our operations, cash flows and financial condition, operating and capital requirements, and other factors as the board of directors considers relevant. There is no assurance that future dividends will be paid, and, if dividends are paid, there is no assurance with respect to the amount of any such dividend.

 

We may become involved in securities class action litigation that could divert management’s attention and harm our business.

 

The stock market in general, and the shares of early-stage companies in particular, have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations. These fluctuations have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of the companies involved. If these fluctuations occur in the future, the market price of our shares could fall regardless of our operating performance. In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a particular company’s securities, securities class action litigation has often been brought against that company. If the market price or volume of our shares suffers extreme fluctuations, then we may become involved in this type of litigation, which would be expensive and divert management’s attention and resources from managing our business.

 

As a public company, we may also from time to time make forward-looking statements about future operating results and provide some financial guidance to the public markets. Projections may not be made timely or set at expected performance levels and could materially affect the price of our shares. Any failure to meet published forward-looking statements that adversely affect the stock price could result in losses to investors, stockholder lawsuits or other litigation, sanctions or restrictions issued by the SEC.

 

Our common stock is currently deemed a “penny stock,” which makes it more difficult for our investors to sell their shares.

 

Our common stock is currently deemed a “penny stock,” which makes it more difficult for our investors to sell their shares. The SEC has adopted rule 3a51-1 which establishes the definition of a “penny stock,” for the purposes relevant to us, as any equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share or with an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. For any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt, Rule 15g-9 requires:

 

•       that a broker or dealer approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks, and

•       the broker or dealer receive from the investor a written agreement to the transaction, setting forth the identity and quantity of the penny stock to be purchased.

 

In order to approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks, the broker or dealer must:

 

•       obtain financial information and investment experience objectives of the person, and

•       make a reasonable determination that the transactions in penny stocks are suitable for that person and the person has sufficient knowledge and experience in financial matters to be capable of evaluating the risks of transactions in penny stocks.

 

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The broker or dealer must also deliver, prior to any transaction in a penny stock, a disclosure schedule prescribed by the SEC relating to the penny stock market, which, in highlight form:

 

•       sets forth the basis on which the broker or dealer made the suitability determination and

•       that the broker or dealer received a signed, written agreement from the investor prior to the transaction.

 

Generally, brokers may be less willing to execute transactions in securities subject to the “penny stock” rules. This may make it more difficult for investors to dispose of our common stock and cause a decline in the market value of our stock. 

 

Risks Relating to Our Company and Industry

 

Our future success will largely depend on the success of our drug candidates, which development will require significant capital resources and years of preclinical and clinical development effort.

 

We currently have no drug products on the market, and none of our drug development projects / pipeline drug candidates has reached preclinical development or clinical trial status. Our business depends almost entirely on the successful clinical development, regulatory approval and commercialization of our pipeline drug candidates. Investors need to be aware that substantial additional investments including preclinical and clinical development and regulatory approval efforts will be required before we are permitted to market and commercialize our pipeline drug candidates, if ever. It may be several years before we can commence clinical trials, if ever. Any clinical trial will be subject to extensive and rigorous review and regulation by numerous government authorities in the United States, the European Union, and other jurisdictions where we intend, if approved, to market our pipeline drug candidates. Before obtaining regulatory approvals for any of our pipeline drug candidates, we must demonstrate through preclinical testing and clinical trials that the pipeline drug candidate is safe and effective for its specific application. This process can take many years and may include post- marketing studies and surveillance, which would require the expenditure of substantial resources. Of the large number of drugs in development for approval in the United States, European Union (and the rest of the world), only a small percentage will successfully complete the FDA regulatory approval process or be granted authorization to be marketed in the European Commission or the other competent authorities in the European Union (“EU”) Member States, or the rest of the world. Accordingly, even if we obtain the sufficient financing to fund our planned research, development and clinical programs, we cannot assure you that any of our pipeline drug candidates will be successfully developed or commercialized.

 

We may be unable to formulate or scale-up any or all of our pipeline drug candidates. There is no guarantee that any of the pipeline drug candidates will be or are able to be manufactured or produced in a manner to meet the FDA’s (or any other international regulatory agency’s) criteria for product stability, content uniformity and all other criteria necessary for product approval in the United States and other markets. Any of our pipeline drug candidates may fail to achieve their specified endpoints in clinical trials.

 

Furthermore, pipeline drug candidates may not be approved even if they achieve their specified endpoints in clinical trials. The FDA (or any other international regulatory agency) may disagree with our trial design and our interpretation of data from clinical trials, or may change the requirements for approval even after it has reviewed and commented on the design for our clinical trials. The FDA may also approve a drug for fewer or more limited indications than we request, or may grant approval contingent on the performance of costly post-approval clinical trials (i.e., Phase IV trials). In addition, the FDA may not approve the labeling claims that we believe are necessary or desirable for the successful commercialization of our pipeline drug candidates.

 

If we are unable to expand our pipeline and obtain regulatory approval for our pipeline drug candidates within the timelines we anticipate, we will not be able to execute our business strategy effectively and our ability to substantially grow our revenues will be limited, which would have a material adverse impact on our long-term business, results of operations, financial condition, and prospects.

 

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Our drug development projects, if approved, may be unable to achieve the expected market acceptance and, consequently, limit our ability to generate revenue

 

Even when drug development is successful and regulatory approval has been obtained, our ability to generate significant revenue depends on the acceptance of our (then) approved medicines by physicians, prescribers and patients. We cannot assure you that any of our pipeline drug candidates will achieve the expected market acceptance and revenue, if and when we obtain the regulatory approvals. The market acceptance of any drug depends on a number of factors, including the indication statement and warnings approved by regulatory authorities for the drug label, continued demonstration of efficacy and safety in commercial use, physicians’ / prescribers willingness to prescribe the drug, reimbursement from third-party payers such as government health care systems and insurance companies, the price of the drug, the nature of any post-approval risk management plans mandated by regulatory authorities, competition, and marketing and distribution support. Any factors preventing or limiting the market acceptance of our drugs could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Results of preclinical studies and earlier clinical trials are not necessarily predictive indicators of future results.

 

Any positive results from future preclinical testing of our pipeline drug candidates and potential future clinical trials may not necessarily be predictive of the results from Phase 1, Phase 2 or Phase 3 clinical trials. In addition, our interpretation of results derived from clinical data or our conclusions based on our preclinical data may prove inaccurate. Frequently, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have suffered significant setbacks in clinical trials after achieving positive results in preclinical testing and early phase clinical trials, and we cannot be certain that we will not face similar setbacks. These setbacks may be caused by the fact that preclinical and clinical data can be susceptible to varying interpretations and analyses. Furthermore, certain pipeline drug candidates may perform satisfactorily in preclinical studies and clinical trials, but nonetheless fail to obtain FDA approval, a marketing authorization granted by the European Commission, or appropriate approvals by the appropriate medicines regulatory authorities in other countries. If we fail to produce positive results in our clinical trials for our pipeline drug candidates, the development timeline and regulatory approval and commercialization prospects for them and as a result our business and financial prospects, would be materially adversely affected.

 

The regulatory approval processes with the FDA, the EMA and other comparable foreign regulatory authorities is lengthy and inherently unpredictable.

 

We are not permitted to market our drug candidates as medicines in the United States or the European Union or other countries until we receive approval of a New Drug Application (“NDA”) from the FDA or a Marketing Authorization Application (“MAA”) from the European Commission, respectively, or in any foreign countries until we receive the approval from the regulatory authorities of such countries. Prior to submitting an NDA to the FDA or an MAA to the EMA for approval of our drug candidates we will need to have completed our preclinical studies and clinical trials. Successfully completing any clinical program and obtaining approval of an NDA or MAA is a complex, lengthy, expensive and uncertain process, and the FDA or EMA (or other country medicines regulatory body) may delay, limit or deny approval of pipeline drug candidates for many reasons, including, among others, because:

 

  an inability to demonstrate that our pipeline drug candidates are safe and effective in treating patients to the satisfaction of the FDA or EMA (or any other country’s medicine regulatory body);

 

  results of clinical trials that may not meet the level of statistical or clinical significance required by the FDA or EMA (or any other country’s medicine regulatory body);

 

  disagreements with the FDA or EMA (or any other country’s medicine regulatory body) with respect to the number, design, size, conduct or implementation of clinical trials;

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  requirements by the FDA and EMA (or any other country’s medicine regulatory body) to conduct additional clinical trials;

 

  disapproval by the FDA or EMA or other applicable foreign regulatory authorities of certain formulations, labeling or specifications of pipeline drug candidates;

 

  findings by the FDA or EMA (or any other country’s medicine regulatory body) that the data from preclinical studies and clinical trials are insufficient;

 

  the FDA or EMA (or any other country’s medicine regulatory body) may disagree with the interpretation of data from preclinical studies and clinical trials; and

 

  the FDA, European Commission or EMA or other applicable foreign regulatory agencies may change their approval policies or adopt new regulations.

 

Any of these factors, many of which are beyond our control, could increase development time and / or costs or jeopardize our ability to obtain regulatory approval for our drug candidates.

 

We may apply for orphan drug status granted by the FDA and / or EMA for some of our drug candidates for the treatment of rare diseases.

 

Regulatory authorities in some jurisdictions, including the United States and the European Union, may designate drugs for relatively small patient populations as orphan drugs. The FDA may grant Orphan Drug Designation (ODD) to drugs intended to treat a rare disease or condition that affects fewer than 200,000 individuals annually in the United States. In the European Union, the EMA’s Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products grants orphan drug designation to promote the development of drugs that are intended for the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of life-threatening or chronically debilitating conditions affecting not more than 5 in 10,000 persons in the European Union. Additionally, such designation is granted for drugs intended for the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of a life-threatening, seriously debilitating or serious and chronic condition and when, without incentives, it is unlikely that sales of the drug in the European Union would be sufficient to justify the necessary investment in developing the drug.

 

In the USA, orphan drug designation entitles a party to financial incentives, such as opportunities for grant funding towards clinical trial costs, tax credits for certain research and user fee waivers under certain circumstances. In addition, if a drug receives the first FDA approval for the drug and indication for which it has orphan drug designation, the drug is entitled to seven years of market exclusivity, which means the FDA may not approve any other application for the same drug for the same indication for a period of seven years, except in limited circumstances, such as a showing of clinical superiority over the drug with orphan drug exclusivity. Orphan drug exclusivity does not prevent the FDA from approving a different drug for the same disease or condition, or the same drug for a different disease or condition.

 

In the European Union, orphan drug designation also entitles a party to financial incentives such as reduction of fees or fee waivers and ten years of market exclusivity following drug approval. This period may be reduced to six years if the orphan drug designation criteria are no longer met, including where it is shown that the drug is sufficiently profitable so that market exclusivity is no longer justified.

 

Whilst the company may wish to apply for ODDs for some or all of its pipeline drug candidates, there is no guarantee that FDA or EMA (or any other international regulatory body) will grant an ODD for any of the company’s pipeline drug candidates.

 

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Our drug candidates may become subject to controlled substance laws and regulations in the U.S.

 

While cannabis and some cannabinoids are controlled substances under the CSA in the United States, we plan to initially focus our drug development projects using cannabinoids and other molecules that are produced from a variety of sources: (1) produced via chemical synthesis and / or (2) produced biosynthetically and / or (3) produced via botanical means.

 

A number of cannabinoid-containing medicines, such as Marinol® or Syndros® (containing dronabinol), or Epidiolex® (containing botanically-derived cannabidiol) or Cesamet® (containing nabilone) have been approved by the FDA for various indications.

 

In the USA, while cannabis-derived cannabinoids with a THC content greater than 0.3%, – during development - are categorized as Schedule I substances under the CSA, the scheduling changes once a medicine has been approved by the FDA.

 

Marinol®, a capsule formulation which contains synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC when formulated is a Schedule III medicine. Syndros® (which also contains synthetic THC, dronabinol) is a liquid formulation as is classified as Schedule II.

 

Epidiolex® was initially a Schedule V medicine when it was introduced in 2018, but was descheduled by the DEA in 2020. It was completely de-scheduled on April 06, 2020.

 

It is our intention to produce pipeline drug candidates via synthetic, and / or biosynthetic and / or botanical means, which may produce complex mixtures and /or extracts or purified drug substance as API.

 

Depending upon the content of our selected API(s), and their subsequent controlled drug status in the USA, and if the company conducts preclinical studies or clinical trials in the United States, we will become subject to the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) laws and regulation in addition to FDA regulations. If the Company decides to proceed with APIs which are controlled drugs, it will evaluate where it is best to conduct its research and preclinical and clinical trials. This may or may not be the USA.

 

Nevertheless, our finished drug products may contain controlled substances as defined in the CSA. Pipeline drug candidates which contain controlled substances are subject to a high degree of regulation under the CSA, which establishes, among other things, certain registration, manufacturing quotas, security, recordkeeping, reporting, import, export and other requirements administered by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). The DEA classifies controlled substances into five schedules: Schedule I, II, III, IV or V substances. Schedule I substances, by definition, have a high potential for abuse, have no currently “accepted medical use” in the United States, lack accepted safety for use under medical supervision, and may not be prescribed, marketed or sold in the United States. Pharmaceutical products approved for use in the United States may be listed as Schedule II, III, IV or V, with Schedule II substances considered to present the highest potential for abuse or dependence and Schedule V substances the lowest relative risk of abuse among such substances. Schedule I and II drugs are subject to the strictest controls under the CSA, including manufacturing and procurement quotas, security requirements and criteria for importation. In addition, dispensing of Schedule II drugs is further restricted. For example, they may not be refilled without a new prescription.

 

While cannabis and some of its derivatives and certain cannabinoids are Schedule I controlled substances, drugs approved for medical use in the United States that contain cannabis, cannabis extracts or certain cannabinoids must be placed in Schedules II - V, or unscheduled, since approval by the FDA satisfies the “accepted medical use” requirement. If, and when any of our pipeline drug candidates receive FDA approval, for those that are considered controlled substances under the CSA, the DEA will make a scheduling determination and place it in a schedule other than Schedule I for it to be prescribed for patients in the United States. If approved by the FDA, depending upon the products potential for abuse amongst other factors, the finished dosage forms of any of our pipeline drug candidates may be listed by the DEA as a Schedule II-V controlled substance. Consequently, their manufacture, importation, exportation, domestic distribution, storage, sale, and legitimate use may be subject to a significant degree of regulation by the DEA (in the USA) and the corresponding competent authorities around the world.

 

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The scheduling process may take one or more years beyond FDA approval in the USA, thereby significantly delaying the launch of our drugs / medicines. However, the DEA must issue a temporary order scheduling the drug within 90 days after the FDA approves the drug and the DEA receives a scientific and medical evaluation and scheduling recommendation from the Department of Health and Human Services. Furthermore, if the FDA, DEA or any foreign regulatory authority determines that any of our drugs may have potential for abuse, it may require us to generate more clinical data than that which is currently anticipated, which could increase the cost and/or delay the launch of our drugs / medicines or APIs (or food or cosmetic ingredients outside of the USA).

  

Clinical trials of cannabinoid-based drug candidates are novel with very limited or non-existing history; we face a significant risk that the trials will not result in commercially viable drugs and treatments.

 

At present, there is only a very limited documented clinical trial history from which we can derive any scientific conclusions for our drug pipeline candidates, or prove that our present assumptions for the current and planned research are scientifically compelling. The API content of the Investigational Medicinal Products (IMPs) can vary from one IMP to another – hence it is not necessarily possible to extrapolate results from studies with one product and predict efficacy of safety with another product containing a similar API a different source. Whilst the principal cannabinoid component may be similar, the APIs may differ in terms of minor cannabinoid content, impurity profiles or degradant profiles. While we are encouraged by the results of clinical trials by others (where they exist), there can be no assurance that any preclinical study or clinical trial will result in producing results which will lead to commercially viable drugs or treatments.

 

Clinical trials are expensive, time consuming and difficult to design and implement. We, as well as the regulatory authorities may suspend, delay or terminate our clinical trials at any time, may require us, for various reasons, to conduct additional clinical trials, or may require a particular clinical trial to continue for a longer duration than originally planned, including, among others:

 

  lack of effectiveness of any API, formulation or delivery system during clinical trials;

 

  discovery of serious or unexpected toxicities or side effects experienced by trial participants or other safety issues;

 

  slower than expected rates of subject recruitment and enrollment rates in clinical trials;

 

  delays or inability in manufacturing or obtaining sufficient quantities of GMP-grade materials for use in clinical trials due to regulatory and manufacturing constraints;

 

  delays in obtaining regulatory authorization to commence a trial, including Institutional Review Board (“IRB”) approvals or DEA approvals, licenses required for obtaining and using cannabis , cannabis-derived cannabinoid or cannabinoid-like substances for research, either before or after a trial is commenced;

 

  unfavorable results from ongoing pre-clinical studies and clinical trials;

 

  patients or investigators failing to comply with clinical trial protocols;

  patients failing to return for post-treatment follow-up at the expected rate;

 

  sites participating in an ongoing clinical trial withdraw, requiring us to engage new sites;

 

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  third-party clinical investigators decline to participate in our clinical trials, do not perform the clinical trials on the anticipated schedule, or act in ways inconsistent with the established investigator agreement, clinical trial protocol, good clinical practices, and other IRB requirements;

 

  third-party entities do not perform data collection and analysis in a timely or accurate manner or at all; or

 

  regulatory inspections of our clinical trials require us to undertake corrective action or suspend or terminate our clinical trials.

 

Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

  

The FDA has not approved any complex botanically-derived cannabinoid drug as a safe and effective drug for any indication.

 

To date, the FDA has not approved any complex botanical cannabinoid medicine as safe and effective for any indication. It has however approved a cannabinoid medicine containing a highly purified cannabinoid (CBD) medicine (Epidiolex®) for a limited number of indications. However, the FDA is aware that there is considerable interest in the use of complex botanical medicines (e.g. Sativex® - which is not approved in the USA, but is approved in some other countries) or purified cannabinoids (e.g. Epidiolex®) or synthesized cannabinoid medicines (e.g. Marinol®) to attempt to treat a number of medical conditions.

 

Before conducting testing in humans of a drug that has not been approved by the FDA, we will need to submit an investigational new drug (“IND”) application to the FDA (or a Clinical Trial Authorization (CTA) to the EMA). Failure to comply with applicable U.S. requirements may subject a company to a variety of administrative or judicial sanctions, such as the FDA’s refusal to approve pending NDAs, warning letters, product recalls, product seizures, total or partial suspension of production or distribution, injunctions, fines, civil penalties and criminal prosecution. Failure to comply with similarly applicable regulatory requirements in other countries may also subject a company to a variety of administrative or judicial sanctions within their country.

 

We face a potentially highly competitive market.

 

Demand for cannabinoid-containing or cannabis-based medicines will likely be dependent on a number of social, political and economic factors that are beyond our control. While we believe that there will be a demand for such drugs, and that the demand will grow, there is no assurance that such demand will happen, that we will benefit from any demand or that our business, in fact, will ever generate revenues from our drug development programs or become profitable.

 

The emerging markets for cannabinoid-containing or cannabis-derived medicines and medical research and development is and will likely remain competitive. The development and commercialization of drugs / medicines is highly competitive. We compete with a variety of multinational pharmaceutical companies and specialized biotechnology companies, as well as products and processes being developed by universities and other research institutions. Many of our competitors have developed, are developing, or will develop drugs and processes which may be competitive with our drug candidates. Competitive therapeutic treatments include those that have already been approved by medicines regulators and accepted by the medical community and any new treatments that may enter the market. For some of our drug development programs / areas of therapeutic interest, other treatment options are currently available, under development, and may become commercially available in the future. If any of our pipeline drug candidates is approved for the diseases and conditions we are currently pursuing, they may compete with a range of medicines / therapeutic treatments that are either in development, will be developed in the future or currently marketed.

 

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We are aware of many companies that are engaged in cannabinoid-derived drug development activities. In addition, other U.S.-based and foreign-based companies are in early stage discovery and preclinical development utilizing the cannabinoids CBD and/or THC.

 

Established companies may have a competitive advantage over us due to their size and experiences, financial resources, and institutional networks. Many of our competitors may have significantly greater financial, technical and human resources than we do. Due to these factors, our competitors may have an advantage in marketing their approved drugs and may obtain regulatory approval of their drug candidates before we are able to, which may limit our ability to develop or commercialize our drug candidates. Our competitors may also develop ingredients and / or drugs / medicines that are safer, more effective, more widely used and less expensive than ours. These advantages could materially impact our ability to develop and, if approved, commercialize our pipeline drug candidates successfully. Furthermore, some of these competitors may make acquisitions or establish collaborative relationships among themselves or with third parties to increase their ability to rapidly gain market share.

 

Our pipeline drug candidates may compete with other cannabinoid or cannabis-based drugs, in addition to competing with state-licensed medical and recreational marijuana, in markets where the recreational and/or medical use of marijuana is legal. There is continuing support in the USA for further state legalization of marijuana. In markets where recreational and/or medical marijuana is not legal, our pipeline drug candidates, once approved by regulators, may compete with marijuana or marijuana-based products purchased in the illegal drug market. This may or may not affect the commercial price that we may be able to achieve for our cannabinoid-containing or other non-cannabinoid-containing regulatory-approved medicines, should they be approved by the FDA.

 

Moreover, as generic versions of drug products enter the market, the price for such medicines may be expected to decline rapidly and substantially. Even if we are the first to obtain FDA approval of one of our pipeline drug candidates, the future potential approval of generics could adversely affect the price we are able to charge and the profitability of our product(s) will likely decline.

 

Mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries may result in more resources being concentrated among a smaller number of our competitors. Smaller and other early-stage companies may also prove to be significant competitors, particularly through collaborative arrangements with large and established companies.

 

These companies may compete with us in recruiting and retaining qualified scientific, management and commercial personnel, utilizing contract manufacturing facilities or contract research organizations (CROs), or establishing clinical trial sites and subject registration for clinical trials, as well as in acquiring technologies complementary to our research projects.

 

Our failure to comply with existing and potential future laws and regulations relating to drug development could harm our plan of operations.

 

Our business is, and will be, subject to wide-ranging existing federal and state laws and regulations and other governmental bodies in each of the countries we may develop and/or market our pipeline drug candidates. We must comply with all regulatory requirements if we expect to be successful.

 

If any of our cannabinoid-containing or cannabis-based or cannabinoid-like-containing pipeline drug candidates are controlled substances and are approved in the United States, they will be subject to ongoing regulatory requirements including federal and state requirements. As a result, we and our contractors, collaborators and/or joint venture partners must continue to expend time, money and effort in all areas of regulatory compliance, including, if applicable, manufacturing, production, quality control and assurance, preclinical research and development and, of upmost importance, clinical trials. We will also be required to report certain adverse reactions and production problems, if any and applicable, to the FDA and other regulatory agencies, and to comply with advertising and promotion requirements for our cannabinoid-containing and or cannabinoid-like-containing drug candidates.

 

Any failure to comply with ongoing regulatory or controlled drug requirements may significantly and adversely affect our ability to conduct clinical trials which are prerequisites to our ability to commercialize our cannabinoid-based and or cannabinoid-like drugs and related treatments. If regulatory sanctions are applied or if regulatory approval, once obtained, is for any reason suspended or withdrawn, the value of our business and our operating results could be materially adversely affected.

 

 28 

 

Our failure to be able to out-license some or all of our pipeline drug candidates could harm our plan of operations.

 

The cost of drug development is high and the attrition rate of new drug pipeline candidates is also high during the drug development process. In order to help fund the development of some of our pipeline drug candidates, the company may wish / need to out-license some of its assets to other (big) pharmaceutical or biotechnology companies. The aim of such out-licensing would be generate funds for the company which may take the form of up-front payments and / or milestone payments and / or royalties. Such decisions will be taken on a case-by-case basis, as the opportunity arises or is required.

 

There is no guarantee that the company will generate pipeline drug candidates which are suitable for out-licensing. In addition, even if the company does produce pipeline drug candidates that are suitable for out-licensing there is no guarantee that the company will be successful in being able to identify potential licensees and successfully negotiate such out-licensing agreements, on agreeable terms if and when required. Any failure to secure such out-licensing agreements may materially affect our ability to finance or develop and / or commercialize one or more of our pipeline drug candidates. Any such failure may materially adversely affect our business.

 

Our failure to be able to enter Research and Development (R & D) Collaboration Agreements or Joint Venture (JV) Agreements for some or all of our pipeline drug candidates could harm our plan of operations

 

As mentioned above, the cost of drug development and manufacturing is high. In order to help fund the development of some of our ingredients and pipeline drug candidates, the company may wish to enter into Research and Development Collaboration Agreements or Joint Venture Agreements with other (big) pharmaceutical or biotechnology companies to help research and develop some of its assets and for those companies pay for some or all of the associated R & D costs. The aim of such Collaboration or JV agreements would be to offset some of the company’s R & D costs. Depending upon the outcome of such R & D or JV Agreements, it may lead to the opportunity to outlicense one or more of the assets investigated under the Collaboration Agreement to the same other (big) pharmaceutical or biotechnology company who may be our R &D Collaboration / JV partner. If successful, this may generate funds for the company which may take the form of up-front payments and / or milestone payments and / or royalties. Such decisions will be taken on a case-by-case basis, as the opportunity arises or is required.

 

There is no guarantee that the company will generate pipeline drug candidates which are suitable for R & D Collaborations or JV Agreements. In addition, even if the company does produce pipeline drug candidates that are suitable for such collaborations or JVs, there is no guarantee that the company will be successful in being able to identify potential R & D collaboration partners or JV partners and successfully negotiate such collaboration or JV agreements, on agreeable terms if and when required. Depending upon the financial status of the company, any failure to secure such collaboration or JV agreements may materially affect our ability to finance or develop and / or commercialize one or more of our pipeline drug candidates. Any such failure may materially adversely affect our business.

 

The introduction of new businesses, products, services, and technologies, our activities in certain jurisdictions, or other actions we take may subject us to additional laws and regulations. The costs of compliance with these laws and regulations are high and are likely to increase in the future. Any failure on our part to comply with laws and regulations can result in negative publicity and diversion of management time and effort and may subject us to significant liabilities and other penalties.

 

We could be subject to litigation, allegations or other legal claims.

 

Our assets or our business activities may be subject to disputes that may result in litigation or other legal claims. We may be subject to allegations through press, social media, the courts or other mediums that may or may not be founded. We may be required to respond to or defend against these claims and/or allegations, which will divert resources away from our principal business. There can be no assurance that our defense of such claims and/or allegations would be successful, and we may be required to make material settlements. This could have a material adverse effect on our business prospects, results of operations, cash flows, financial condition and corporate reputation.

 

 29 

 

Item 2. Properties

 

We do not own any real property. We maintain our corporate offices at 47 Hamilton Square Birkenhead Merseyside CH41 5AR United Kingdom. One of the company directors has a beneficial ownership in the property, which is leased on “arm’s length” terms.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

 

We are not a party to any pending legal proceeding. We are not aware of any pending legal proceeding to which any of our officers, directors, or any beneficial holders of 5% or more of our voting securities are adverse to us or have a material interest adverse to us.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

 30 

PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock is quoted under the symbol “ABTI” on the OTC Pink operated by OTC Markets Group, Inc.

 

There is currently no active trading market for our securities. There is no assurance that a regular trading market will develop, or if developed, that it will be sustained. Therefore, a shareholder may be unable to resell his securities in our company.

 

Penny Stock

 

The Securities Exchange Commission (“SEC”) has adopted rules that regulate broker-dealer practices in connection with transactions in penny stocks. Penny stocks are generally equity securities with a price of less than $5.00, other than securities registered on certain national securities exchanges or quoted on the NASDAQ system, provided that current price and volume information with respect to transactions in such securities is provided by the exchange or system. The penny stock rules require a broker-dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document prepared by the Commission, that: (a) contains a description of the nature and level of risk in the market for penny stocks in both public offerings and secondary trading;(b) contains a description of the broker's or dealer's duties to the customer and of the rights and remedies available to the customer with respect to a violation to such duties or other requirements of Securities' laws; (c) contains a brief, clear, narrative description of a dealer market, including bid and ask prices for penny stocks and the significance of the spread between the bid and ask price;(d) contains a toll-free telephone number for inquiries on disciplinary actions;(e) defines significant terms in the disclosure document or in the conduct of trading in penny stocks; and;(f) contains such other information and is in such form, including language, type, size and format, as the Commission shall require by rule or regulation.

 

The broker-dealer also must provide, prior to effecting any transaction in a penny stock, the customer with; (a) bid and offer quotations for the penny stock;(b) the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction;(c) the number of shares to which such bid and ask prices apply, or other comparable information relating to the depth and liquidity of the market for such stock; and (d) a monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer's account.

 

In addition, the penny stock rules require that prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from those rules; the broker-dealer must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser's written acknowledgment of the receipt of a risk disclosure statement, a written agreement to transactions involving penny stocks, and a signed and dated copy of a written suitability statement.

 

These disclosure requirements may have the effect of reducing the trading activity in the secondary market for our stock if it becomes subject to these penny stock rules. Therefore, because our common stock is subject to the penny stock rules, stockholders may have difficulty selling those securities.

 

Holders of Our Common Stock

 

Currently, we have approximately 169 holders of record of our common stock.

 

Stock Option Grants

 

To date, we have not granted any stock options. 

  

 31 

 

Dividends

 

There are no restrictions in our articles of incorporation or bylaws that prevent us from declaring dividends. The Nevada Revised Statutes, however, do prohibit us from declaring dividends where after giving effect to the distribution of the dividend:

 

1. we would not be able to pay our debts as they become due in the usual course of business, or;

 

2.

our total assets would be less than the sum of our total liabilities plus the amount that would be needed to

satisfy the rights of shareholders who have preferential rights superior to those receiving the distribution.

 

We have not declared any dividends and we do not plan to declare any dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities 

 

During the year ended September 30, 2020, the Company issued 13,000,000 shares of common stock to individuals for services rendered with a deemed value of services provided of $130,000.

 

During the period ended March 31, 2021, the Company issued 3,200,000 shares of common stock for services rendered with a deemed value of services provided of $32,000.

 

We issued 600,000,000 shares of common stock to the shareholders of ABTI Pharma Limited in connection with a Stock Transfer Agreement dated January 19, 2021. As part of the transaction, the 200,000,000 shares to Amsterdam Café Holdings Ltd. were cancelled and Bulls Run Investments Limited was issued 19,100,000 shares of common stock. Also, 2,000,000 shares of common stock were issued for services rendered, and with the above transactions, amounts to acquisition with a deemed value of $ 621,100.

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2021, the company issued 280,000 shares in exchange for cash of $136,721.

 

On December 21, 2021, the company issued 520,000 shares of stock in exchange for $130,000 of cash consideration.

 

On October 29, 2021, the Company issued 7,500,000 shares of stock in exchange for services provided by EMC2 Capital. The shares were issued at fair value of the date of exchange, or $2,399,250.

 

As pursuant to the asset purchase agreement dated November 9, 2021, the Company acquired certain intellectual property rights of C2 Wellness Corp. In exchanges for the assets acquired, the Company issued 24,000,000 shares of common stock valued at $0.50 per share. The intellectual property rights acquired are recorded as intangible assets as of December 31, 2021 for $12,000,000.

 

On or about March 3, 2022, the Company issued 16,000,000 shares of stock for services under a consulting agreement.

 

On May 4, 2022, we issued 2,250,000 shares of our common stock to our director, Mr. Michael Hunter Land, pursuant to his employment agreement dated October 18, 2021 and board decision to award him shares for his performance.  

 

These securities were issued pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act and/or Rule 506 promulgated thereunder. The holders represented their intention to acquire the securities for investment only and not with a view towards distribution. The investors were given adequate information about us to make an informed investment decision. We did not engage in any general solicitation or advertising. We directed our transfer agent to issue the stock certificates with the appropriate restrictive legend affixed to the restricted stock.

 

 32 

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

We did not issue any securities under any equity compensation plan as of March 31, 2022.

 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

 

A smaller reporting company is not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations Forward-Looking Statements

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements, within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Certain statements, other than purely historical information, including estimates, projections, statements relating to our business plans, objectives, and expected operating results, and the assumptions upon which those statements are based, are “forward-looking statements.” These forward-looking statements generally are identified by the words “believes,” “project,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “intends,” “strategy,” “plan,” “may,” “will,” “would,” “will be,” “will continue,” “will likely result,” and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and assumptions that are subject to risks and uncertainties which may cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements. Our ability to predict results or the actual effect of future plans or strategies is inherently uncertain. Factors which could have a material adverse effect on our operations and future prospects on a consolidated basis include but are not limited to: changes in economic conditions, global pandemics, legislative/regulatory changes, availability of capital, interest rates, competition, and generally accepted accounting principles. These risks and uncertainties should also be considered in evaluating forward-looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements.

 

Results of Operations for the Years Ended March 31, 2022 and 2021

 

We have generated no revenues since inception and we do not anticipate earning revenues until such time that we are able to market and sell our ingredients and / or products / medicines.

 

We incurred operating expenses of $6,471,134 and $309,500 for the years ended March 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. Our operating expenses for the year ended March 31, 2022 were mainly the result of $3,155,593 in consulting fees, $341,286 in research and development, $133,036 in accounting and audit fees and $194,643 in salaries and wages. Our operating expenses for the year ended March 31, 2021 were mainly the result of $243,000 in consulting fees, $30,000 in director fees and expenses and $26,500 in accounting and audit fees.

 

We expect that our operation expenses will increase significantly for the balance of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022 and beyond. This would be the result of increased research and development expenses associated with our product candidates, the regulatory process of approval of those products, as well as the expenses associated with our reporting obligations with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

We recorded a net loss of $6,471,134 and $390,500 for the years ended March 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively.

 

As a relatively newly formed pharmaceutical company, the company has limited operations to date, and expects to have reoccurring losses, as is typical with companies in the pharmaceutical industry, for the foreseeable future. As explained above, the company intends to raise capital and ramp up its efforts to bring its product candidates to market. This will require significant capital, product development to continue and complete and momentum on those product candidates through the regulatory process. There are no assurances that we will be able to generate revenues and achieve profitable operations.

 

 33 

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of March 31, 2022, we had $127,961 in current assets and currently liabilities of $1,201,685. We had a working capital deficit of $1,073,724 as of March 31, 2022 as compared with $1,127,106 as of December 31, 2021.

 

We had cash provided by operating activities of $44,344 for the year ended March 31, 2022, mainly a result of our net loss of $6,471,134 offset by working capital changes of $6,109,260.

 

We used non cash in investing activities for the year ended March 31, 2022.

 

We had cash used by financing activities of $9,669 for the year ended March 31, 2022 from share issuances and convertible notes payable offset by payments of $542,545 to related parties.

 

Based upon our current financial condition, we do not have sufficient cash to operate our business at the current level for the next 12 months. We intend to fund operations through debt and/or equity financing arrangements, which may be insufficient to fund expenditures or other cash requirements. We plan to seek additional financing in a private equity offering to secure funding for operations. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in raising additional funding. If we are not able to secure additional funding, the implementation of our business plan will be impaired. There can be no assurance that such additional financing will be available to us on acceptable terms or at all.

 

We received US $100,000 in funding in July 2021 and we entered into an equity line financing in August 2021 for up to US $125,000,000. A further £100,000 Sterling (US $137,627) was invested in September 2021 and a further US $130,000 was invested into the company in November and December 2021.  

 

The company is hopeful that this financing may assist the company to raise the funds needed to implement its business plan. The financing, however, is conditional on filing a registration statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission, which was filed in October and was declared effective by the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 29, 2021, and other factors set forth in the definitive agreements. If we are unable to use the equity line, or we are limited in the amounts of funds we are able to draw from such line, we may not realize the funds necessary to implement our business plan exclusively from this equity line financing.

 

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

As of March 31, 2022, we had no off balance sheet arrangements.

 

Going Concern

 

Our financial statements were prepared assuming we will continue as a going concern which contemplates the realization of assets and satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. We have negative working capital of $1,073,724 and have incurred losses since inception of $7,970,510. We expect to incur further losses in the development of our business and have been dependent on funding operations from inception. These conditions raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans include continuing to finance operations through the private or public placement of debt and/or equity securities and the reduction of expenditures. However, no assurance can be given at this time as to whether we will be able to achieve these objectives. The financial statements do not include any adjustment relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should we be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

We do not expect the adoption of recently issued accounting pronouncements to have a significant impact on our results of operation, financial position or cash flow.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

A smaller reporting company is not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

 34 

 

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 

 

Index to Financial Statements Required by Article 8 of Regulation S-X: Audited Financial Statements:

F-1 Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
F-2 Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2022 and 2021;
F-3 Statements of Operations for the years ended March 31, 2022 and 2021;
F-4 Statement of Stockholders’ Deficit from inception to March 31, 2022;
F-5 Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended March 31, 2022 and 2021;
F-6 Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 35 

 

Gries & Associates, LLC

Certified Public Accountants

501 S. Cherry Street, Suite 1100

Denver, Colorado 80246

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders
Alterola Biotech, Inc.

Opinion on the Financial Statements

We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Alterola Biotech, Inc. (the Company) as of March 31, 2022 and 2021, and the related statement of operations, stockholders’ deficit and cash flows for the period then ended and the related notes (collectively referred to as the financial statements). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of March 31, 2022 and 2021, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the period then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

Basis for Opinion

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audit, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

Our audit included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audit also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion

Going Concern Uncertainty

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in note 7 to the financial statements, the Company has negative working capital of $ 1,073,724, has incurred losses since inception of $7,970,510, and has not received any revenues These factors create an uncertainty as to the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in regard to these matters are also described in note 7. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Critical Audit Matter

 

The critical audit matter communicated below is a matter arising from the current-period audit of the financial statements that was communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that (1) relates to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgements. The communication of critical audit matters does not alter in any way our opinion on the financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matter below, providing a separate opinion on the critical audit matter or on the disclosures to which it relates.

 

Intangible Assets

 

Critical Audit Matter Description

 

On November 9, 2021, the Company entered into an agreement with C2 Wellness Corporation for acquisition of technology platforms and associated intellectual property.

 

The transaction was closed by providing 24,000,000 million shares of the company to the prior owners of C2 Wellness Corporation, who stayed on and are working as consultants for the company. At the date of acquisition, the price per share of the company shares was $0.50, and the value of the intangible asset identified was $12,000,000. The Company tests impairment by either performing a qualitative evaluation or a quantitative test, at least annually, or more frequently if an indication of impairment exists. Managements Quantitative Intangible Assets impairment testing is performed in the fourth quarter of the fiscal year by comparing the estimated fair value of the associated reporting unit as of March 31 to it carrying value. Fair value is estimated using a discounted cash flow model.

 

Significant judgment is exercised by the Company in determining the accounting policies related to these Intangible Assets impairment assumptions, including the following:

 

·Estimated revenue growth rate for the projection period
·Estimation of operating cash flows based on forecasted figures for the impairment model
·Review of the assets acquired as part of the transaction.
·Review of any possible projected revenues or development of assets for future periods.
·Discussion with the development team related to timeline for possible production.

 

Given these factors, the related audit effort in evaluation management’s judgements in determining Intangible Assets value was extensive and required a high degree of auditor judgement.

 

How the Critical Audit Matter Was Addressed in the Audit

 

Our principal audit procedures related to the Company’s Intangible Assets impairment evaluation included the following:

 

·Reviewed Qualitative items for Intangible Assets impairment, determining if there was a need to perform Quantitative assessment.
·Recalculated the Quantitative assessment of the Intangible Assets calculation, including a reasonableness test of the discount rate and projected growth rate.
·Reviewing projections to comparable companies, ensuring reasonableness of the rates used.
·Verified no impairment noted based on recalculations performed.

 

Shares issued for services

 

Critical Audit Matter Description

 

At various points throughout the year, the Company issued stock in exchange for services provided from EMC2 Capital and REB Consulting. As part of the issuance of shares, the Company valued the shares at what was considered fair value as of the date of the issuance. The company considered the fair value at the date of issuance to be the share price of the Company on the date of issuance.

 

How the Critical Audit Matter Was Addressed in the Audit

 

Our principal audit procedures related to the Company’s stock issued for services included the following:

 

·Confirmed the issuance of shares with the transfer agent to verify the shares were released to the identified parties.
·Reviewed the share value as of the date of issuance and performed recalculation of the valuation.
·Verified the expense recorded was properly included on the statement of operations in the appropriate expense category.

 

Emphasis of Matters-Risks and Uncertainties

 

The Company is not able to predict the ultimate impact that COVID -19 will have on its business. However, if the current economic conditions continue, the pandemic could have an adverse impact on the economies and
financial markets of many countries, including the geographical area in which the Company plans to operate.

 

 
We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2021.
   

Denver, Colorado

June 10, 2021

PCAOB # 6778

   

 

 

blaze@griesandassociates.com

400 South Colorado Blvd, Suite 870, Denver, Colorado 80246

(O)720-464-2875 (M)773-255-5631 (F)720-222-5846

 F-1 

 

ALTEROLA BIOTECH, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

AS OF MARCH 31, 2022 AND MARCH 31, 2021  

 

   March 31, 2022  March 31, 2021
ASSETS          
Current Assets          
Bank  $63,816   $519 
Funds in attorney trust account   12,409       
VAT Receivable   50,686      
Inventory   1,050       
         —   
Total current assets   127,961    519 
           
Intellectual property   12,000,000       
           
TOTAL ASSETS  $12,127,961   $519 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT          
           
Current Liabilities          
Accounts payable  $542,510   $98,379 
Accrued expenses   396,486    20,244 
Accrued expenses- related party         562,665 
Advances from related party   98,470    78,350 
Convertible Note Payable   164,220       
Total Current Liabilities   1,201,685    759,638 
           
           
Total Liabilities   1,201,685    759,638 
           
Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)          
Preferred Stock, $.001 par value, 10,000,000 shares authorized, -0- shares issued and outstanding            
Common Stock, $.001 par value, 2,000,000,000 shares authorized, 802,633,333 and 754,280,000 shares issued and outstanding, respectively   802,633    754,280 
Foreign currency translation adjustment   14,599    (14,023)
Additional paid-in capital   18,079,554       
Accumulated deficit   (7,970,510)   (1,499,376)
Total Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)   10,926,276    (759,119)
           
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT  $12,127,961   $519 

   

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

 

 F-2 

 

ALTEROLA BIOTECH, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31, 2022 AND 2021 

                 
   March 31, 2022  March 31, 2021
           
REVENUES  $     $   
           
           
OPERATING EXPENSES          
Accounting and audit fees   133,036    26,500 
Research and development   2,432,210       
Professional fees   341,286       
Legal fees   38,248    5,000 
Directors fees and expenses   82,913    30,000 
Consulting fees   3,155,593    243,000 
Salaries and wages   194,643       
General and administrative expenses   93,206    5,000 
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES   6,471,134    309,500 
           
LOSS FROM OPERATIONS   (6,471,134)   (309,500)
           
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)          
Miscellaneous sale            
TOTAL OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)            
           
PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES            
           
NET LOSS  $(6,471,134)   (309,500)
           
NET LOSS PER SHARE: BASIC AND DILUTED  $(0.00)  $(0.00)
           
WEIGHTED AVERAGE NUMBER OF SHARES OUTSTANDING: BASIC AND DILUTED   769,967,671    442,363,333 

 

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

 F-3 

 

ALTEROLA BIOTECH, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

FOR THE PERIOD FROM JANUARY 7, 2021 (INCEPTION) TO MARCH 31 2021 AND MARCH 31, 2022  

                                                 
    Common stock                     
    Shares    Amount    Additional paid in capital    Accumulated other comprehensive income ( loss)    Deficit    Total 
Balance, January 7, 2021 (inception)   100   $136         $     $     $136 
Related party interest forgiven               1,544                1,544 
Recapitalization on reverse merger   754,279,900    754,144    (1,544)         (1,156,343)   (403,743)
Change in foreign currency                     (14,023)         (14,023)
Net loss                           (343,033)   (343,033)
Balance, March 31, 2021   754,280,000   $754,280        $(14,023)  $(1,499,376)  $(759,119)
Change in foreign currency                     28,622          28,622 
Shares issued for cash   853,333    853    367,804                368,657 
C2 Wellness acquisition   24,000,000    24,000    11,976,000                12,000,000 
Shares issued related to S-1 Registration   7,500,000    7,500    2,391,750                2,399,250 
Shares issued for services REB Consulting   16,000,000    16,000    3,344,000                3,360,000 
Net loss                           (6,471,134)   (6,471,134)
Balance, March 31, 2022   802,633,333   $802,633   $18,079,554   $14,599   $(7,970,510)  $10,926,276 

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

 F-4 

 

ALTEROLA BIOTECH, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2022 AND 2021 

                 
   March 31, 2022  March 31, 2021
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES          
Net loss for the period  $(6,471,134)  $(309,500)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash          
Shares issued for services   5,759,250    243,000 
           
Changes in assets and liabilities:          
Inventory   (1,050)      
Funds in attorney trust   (12,409)   2,500 
Receivables   (50,686)      
Accruals   376,242    14,000 
Accounts payable   444,131       
Net Cash (Used by) Operating Activities   44,344    (50,000)
           
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES          
  Investment in intellectual property            
Net Cash Used by Investing Activities            
           
           
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES          
 Convertible debt issued   164,220       
Sale of common shares for cash   368,657       
Net from related parties   (542,545)   50,000 
Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities   (9,669)   50,000 
           
Effect of exchange rate adjustments on cash   28,622       
           
Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash and Cash Equivalents   34,675       
           
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period   519       
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period  $63,817   $   
           
SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW INFORMATION          
Interest paid  $     $   
Income taxes paid  $     $   
           
NON-CASH INVESTING AND FINANCING INFORMATION          
C2 Wellness acquisition – shares issued  $12,000,000   $   
Shares issued for services  $5,759,250   $243,000 
Shares to be issued for acquisition         600,000 

   

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

 

 F-5 

 

ALTEROLA BIOTECH, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2022

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF BUSINESS

 

After formation, the Company was in the business of mineral exploration. On May 3, 2010, the Company sold its mineral exploration business and entered into an Intellectual Property Assignment Agreement (“IP Agreement”) with Soren Nielsen pursuant to which Mr. Nielsen transferred his right, title and interest in all intellectual property relating to certain chewing gum compositions having appetite suppressant activity (the “IP”) to the Company for the issuance of 55,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock.

Following the acquisition of the IP the Company changed its business direction to pursue the development of chewing gums for the delivery of Nutraceutical/functional ingredients for applications such as appetite suppressant, cholesterol suppressant, vitamin delivery, antioxidant delivery and motion sickness suppressant.

On January 19, 2021, the Company entered into an Stock Purchase Agreement (the “Agreement”) with ABTI Pharma Limited, a company registered in England and Wales (“ABTI Pharma”), pursuant to which the Company agreed to acquire all of the outstanding shares of capital stock of ABTI Pharma from its shareholders in exchange for 600,000,000 shares of the Company pro rata to the ABTI Pharma shareholders. The shares were issued on January 29, 2021 in anticipation of the closing and the parties to the transaction agreed in a March 24, 2021 amendment to close upon the ABTI Pharma Limited Shares being transferred to the Company, which was to occur upon the filing by the Company of its outstanding December 31, 2020 quarterly report on Form 10-Q, which was filed on May 28, 2021 with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The transaction closed on May 28, 2021.

 

Following the acquisition of ABTI Pharma, the business plan of the company was no longer focused on a chewing gum delivery system but re-focus its activities to the development of cannabinoid, cannabinoid-like, and non-cannabinoid pharmaceutical active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), pharmaceutical medicines made from cannabinoid, cannabinoid-like, and non-cannabinoid APIs and European novel food approval of cannabinoid-based, cannabinoid-like and non-cannabinoid ingredients and products .In addition, the company plans to develop such bulk ingredients for supply into the cosmetic sector.

 

The transaction is being accounted for as a reverse acquisition and recapitalization. ABTI Pharma is the acquirer for accounting purposes and the Company is the issuer.. The Agreement was treated as a recapitalization and not as a business combination; at the date of the acquisition, the net liabilities of the legal acquirer, Alterola, were $389,721.

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying consolidated financial statements were prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United State of America (GAAP accounting) and include the accounts of Alterola and its wholly owned subsidiaries ABTI Pharma, Phytotherapeutix Ltd and Ferven Ltd. All material intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated.

 

The Company had a September 30 fiscal year end. Subsequent to the Agreement with ABTI Pharma, the Company has changed its year end from September 30 to March 31.

 

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date the financial statements and the reported amount of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Cash and Equivalents

For purposes of the statement of cash flows, the Company considers highly liquid financial instruments purchased with a maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents. 

 

 F-6 

  

ALTEROLA BIOTECH, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2022

 

NOTE 3 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

Funds in attorney trust account

The company has a fully operational US Dollar ($) and a Sterling (£) bank account in the United Kingdom with the HSBC Group. Amounts due from attorney represents fund held on behalf of the Company in trust by its legal counsel.  

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Alterola’s financial instruments consist of cash and equivalents, accrued expenses, accrued interest and notes payable. The carrying amount of these financial instruments approximates fair value (“FV”) due either to length of maturity or interest rates that approximate prevailing market rates unless otherwise disclosed in these financial statements.

 

FV is defined as the price that would be received upon sale of an asset or paid upon transfer of a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date and in the principal or most advantageous market for that asset or liability. The FV should be calculated based on assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, not on assumptions specific to the entity. In addition, the FV of liabilities should include consideration of non-performance risk including our own credit risk.

 

In addition to defining FV, the disclosure requirements around FV establish a FV hierarchy for valuation inputs which is expanded. The hierarchy prioritizes the inputs into three levels based on the extent to which inputs used in measuring FV are observable in the market. Each FV measurement is reported in one of the three levels which is determined by the lowest level input that is significant to the FV measurement in its entirety. These levels are:

 

Level 1 – inputs are based upon unadjusted quoted prices for identical instruments traded in active markets.

 

Level 2 – inputs are based upon significant observable inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1, such as quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active, and model-based valuation techniques for which all significant assumptions are observable in the market or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities.

  

Level 3 – inputs are generally unobservable and typically reflect management’s estimates of assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability. The FV are therefore determined using model-based techniques that include option pricing models, discounted cash flow models, and similar techniques.

 

The carrying value of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities which consist of cash, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, and notes payable are valued using level 1 inputs. The Company believes that the recorded values approximate their FV due to the short maturity of such instruments. Unless otherwise noted, it is management’s opinion that the Company is not exposed to significant interest, exchange or credit risks arising from these financial instruments.

  

Income Taxes

Income taxes are computed using the asset and liability method. Under the asset and liability method, deferred income tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and are measured using the currently enacted tax rates and laws. A valuation allowance is provided for the amount of deferred tax assets that, based on available evidence, are not expected to be realized.

 

 F-7 

 

ALTEROLA BIOTECH, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2022

 

NOTE 3 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

Foreign Currency Translation

The financial statements are presented in US Dollars. Transactions with foreign subsidiaries where US dollars are not the functional currency will be recorded in accordance with Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 830 Foreign Currency Transaction. According to Topic 830, all assets and liabilities are translated at the exchange rate on the balance sheet date, stockholders’ equity is translated at historical rates and statement of operations items are translated at the weighted average exchange rate for the period. The resulting translation adjustments are reported under other comprehensive income (loss) in accordance with ASC Topic 220, Comprehensive Income . Gains and losses resulting from the translations of foreign currency transactions and balances are reflected in the statement of operations and comprehensive income (loss )

 

Revenue Recognition

On January 1, 2018, the Company adopted ASC Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers ("ASC 606"), using the modified retrospective method applied to those contracts which were not completed as of January 1, 2018. Results for reporting periods beginning after January 1, 2018 are presented under ASC 606, while prior period amounts are not adjusted and continue to be reported in accordance with our historic accounting under ASC 605. As of and for the year ended March 31, 2022, the financial statements were not materially impacted as a result of the application of Topic 606 compared to Topic 605.

 

Loss Per Common Share

Basic loss per share is calculated using the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during each reporting period. Diluted loss per share includes potentially dilutive securities such as outstanding options and warrants, using various methods such as the treasury stock or modified treasury stock method in the determination of dilutive shares outstanding during each reporting period. The Company has issued 15 million warrants to EMC2 Capital LLC..

 

Stock-Based Compensation

Stock-based compensation is accounted for at FV in accordance with ASC Topic 718. To date, the Company has not adopted a stock option plan and has not granted any stock options

 

Risks and Uncertainties

On January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus outbreak a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern” and on March 10, 2020, declared it to be a pandemic.  Actions taken around the world to help mitigate the spread of the coronavirus include restrictions on travel, and quarantines in certain areas, and forced closures for certain types of public places and business.  The Coronavirus and actions taken to mitigate it have had and are expected to have an adverse impact on the economies and financial markets of many countries, including the geographical area in which the Company plans to operate.”

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Alterola does not expect the adoption of recently issued accounting pronouncements to have a significant impact on the Company’s results of operations, financial position or cash flow.

 

 F-8 

 

ALTEROLA BIOTECH, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2022

 

NOTE 4 – ACCRUED EXPENSES

 

Accrued expenses consisted of the following at March 31, 2022 and March 31, 2021:

 

   March 31, 2022  March 31, 2021
Audit fees  $32,687   $   
Accounting   26,275    5,600 
Research and development   326,080       
Legal fees and transfer agent   11,444    15,644 
Total Accrued Expenses  $396,486   $20,244 

 

NOTE 5 – CONVERTIBLE NOTE PAYABLE

 

On September 21, 2021, the Company entered into a Convertible Loan Agreement (“Convertible Loan”) with an outside party. The Agreement was bearing 20% interest and was convertible at 60% of the published share price, with a minimum conversion price per share of $1.34 per share. The debt had a term of 9 months from the date of initiation. As of March 31, 2022, the outstanding balance on the loan was $164,220.

 

NOTE 6 – CAPITAL STOCK

 

The Company has 2,000,000,000 shares of $0.001 par value common stock authorized and 10,000,000 shares of $0.001 par value preferred stock authorized.

 

On October 29, 2021, the Company issued 7,500,000 shares of stock in exchange for services provided by EMC2 Capital. The shares were issued at fair value of the date of exchange, or $2,399,250.

 

As pursuant to the asset purchase agreement dated November 9, 2021, the Company acquired certain intellectual property rights of C2 Wellness Corp. In exchanges for the assets acquired, the Company issued 24,000,000 shares of common stock valued at $0.50 per share. The intellectual property rights acquired are recorded as intangible assets as of December 31, 2021 for $12,000,000.

 

On or about March 3, 2022, the Company issued 16,000,000 shares of stock for services under a consulting agreement. The shares were issued at fair value the date of the exchange, or $3,360,000.

 

The Company has 802,633,333 and 754,280,000 shares of common stock issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2022 and March 31, 2021, respectively. There are no shares of preferred stock issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2022 and March 31, 2021.

 

 F-9 

 

ALTEROLA BIOTECH, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2022 

 

NOTE 7 – ACQUISITION 

 

On November 9, 2021, the Company entered into an agreement with C2 Wellness Corporation for acquisition of technology platforms and associated intellectual property. The transaction was closed by providing 24,000,000 shares of the company to the prior owners of C2 Wellness Corporation.. At the date of acquisition, the price per share of the company shares was $0.50, and the value of the intangible asset identified was $12,000,000. As part of annual impairment procedures performed, the Company did not find sufficient evidence to write down the asset, and as such the value at March 31, 2022 is $12,000,000.

 

NOTE 8 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

Alterola does not own any real property. We maintain our corporate offices at 47 Hamilton Square Birkenhead Merseyside CH41 5AR United Kingdom. One of the company directors has a beneficial ownership in the property, which is leased on “arm’s length” terms.

 

There is no obligation for the officer to continue this arrangement. Such costs are immaterial to the financial statements and accordingly are not reflected herein.

 

The officers and directors are involved in other business activities and most likely will become involved in other business activities in the future.

 

During the period ended March 31, 2022, various related parties made advances to the company to fund operating expenses in the amount of $98,470. These advances are non – interest bearing and have no specified terms of repayment. 

  

NOTE 9 – LIQUIDITY & GOING CONCERN

 

Alterola has negative working capital of $909,504, has incurred losses since inception of $7,970,510, and has not received revenues from sales of products or services. These factors create substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements do not include any adjustment that might be necessary if the Company is unable to continue as a going concern.

 

The ability of Alterola to continue as a going concern is dependent on the Company generating cash from the sale of its common stock and/or obtaining debt financing and attaining future profitable operations. Management’s plans include selling its equity securities and obtaining debt financing to fund its capital requirement and ongoing operations; however, there can be no assurance the Company will be successful in these efforts.

 

NOTE 10 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

In accordance with ASC Topic 855-10, the Company analyzed its operations subsequent to March 31, 2022 to the date these financial statements were issued, and determined it does not have any material subsequent events to disclose in these financial statements.

 F-10 

 

Item 9. Changes In and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

On May 20, 2021, AJ Robbins CPA LLC resigned as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm.

 

On May 20, 2021, the Company engaged Gries & Associates, LLC (the “New Accountant”) as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm. The engagement of the New Accountant was approved by the Company’s Board of Directors.

 

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures Disclosure Controls and Procedures

As required by Rule 13a-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, we have carried out an evaluation of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this annual report, being March 31, 2022. This evaluation was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer.

 

Disclosure controls and procedures are controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed or submitted under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our company’s reports filed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Based upon that evaluation, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were ineffective as of the end of the period covered by this annual report.

 

Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934). Management has assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of March 31, 2021 based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. As a result of this assessment, management concluded that, as of March 31, 2022, our internal control over financial reporting was not effective. Our management identified the following material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, which are indicative of many small companies with small staff: (i) inadequate segregation of duties and effective risk assessment; and (ii) insufficient written policies and procedures for accounting and financial reporting with respect to the requirements and application of both US GAAP and SEC guidelines.

 

We plan to take steps to enhance and improve the design of our internal control over financial reporting. During the period covered by this annual report on Form 10-K, we have not been able to remediate the material weaknesses identified above. To remediate such weaknesses, we hope to implement the following changes during our fiscal year ending March 31, 2023: (i) appoint additional qualified personnel to address inadequate segregation of duties and ineffective risk management; and (ii) adopt sufficient written policies and procedures for accounting and financial reporting. The remediation efforts set out in (i) and (ii) are largely dependent upon our securing additional financing to cover the costs of implementing the changes required. If we are unsuccessful in securing such funds, remediation efforts may be adversely affected in a material manner.

 

This annual report does not include an attestation report of our registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by our registered public accounting firm pursuant to an exemption for non-accelerated filers set forth in Section 989G of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

 

 36 

 

Remediation of Material Weakness

 

We are unable to remedy our controls related to the inadequate segregation of duties and ineffective risk management until we receive financing to hire additional employees. We recently hired an outsourced controller to improve the controls for accounting and financial reporting.

 

Limitations on the Effectiveness of Internal Controls

 

Our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal control over financial reporting are or will be capable of preventing or detecting all errors or all fraud. Any control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control system’s objectives will be met. The design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Further, because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that misstatements, due to error or fraud will not occur or that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision- making can be faulty and that breakdowns may occur because of simple error or mistake. Controls can also be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of controls. The design of any system of controls is based in part on certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Projections of any evaluation of controls effectiveness to future periods are subject to risk.

 

Item 9B. Other Information

 

None.

 

Item 9C. Disclosure Regarding Foreign Jurisdictions that Prevent Inspections

 

None.

 

 37 

PART III

 

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

The following information sets forth the names, ages, and positions of our current directors and executive officers.

Name   Age   Positions and Offices Held
Timothy Rogers     58     Chairman, CFO and Director
Seamus McAuley     46     Chief Executive Officer, Secretary and Director
Colin Stott     56     Chief Operating Officer and Director
Hunter Land     38     Vice President of Translational Research and Director
Dominic Schiller     58     Chief Intellectual Property Officer and Director
Daniel Reshef     70     Director
Ning Qu     54     Director
David Hitchcock     59     Director

 

Set forth below is a brief description of the background and business experience of each of our current executive officers and directors.

 

 38 

 

Timothy Paul Rogers – CFO - Director - Chairman Age 58

 

Timothy. Rogers is an international business leader with 35 years’ experience in global sales and marketing, specifically launching products from an intellectual property platform. Mr. Rogers is multi-lingual, and has been involved with start-ups in Singapore, South East Asia, Africa, Australia, the United States, Canada and Europe in the pharmaceutical, agriculture, essential oil, biocide, oil and gas and cosmetic sectors. He has gained success from a number of industry disturbing products and services, leading in particular, to being part of the team taking control of Alterola. Trained as an accountant, he is known for his finance connections, his complex business interests across the globe and specifically in Africa, ranging from mining, agriculture and controlled substances and linking them all to a focused coffee based social equity program for economic empowerment of African agricultural workers. He is known for his closeness to a number of African politicians and business leaders, and his co-operation with these 21st century African entrepreneurs is with the aim to establish a new foreign investment policy in Africa to use the vast resource of that continent to benefit the most disadvantaged in society. Tim has lived and worked in UK, Ireland, France, Australia, U.S.A and Thailand for the past 40 years and has conducted business in over 40 countries across the world physically visiting each one personally.

 

He currently serves as a Director of Novagean International Limited. a medical device and therapeutic diagnostic manufacturer and clinical research company based in China and Galway Ireland.

 

In recent years, Mr. Rogers has focused his time building a multi-sector agro-pharma drug development business in Africa which includes controlled substances.

 

Mr. Rogers earned diplomas including Business Studies from Birkenhead Technical College, and Animation at the Fisher School of English in Paris, France

 

Seamus McAuley – Director – Chief Executive Officer- Age 46

 

Seamus McAuley is a proven Senior Commercial Executive with extensive experience in bringing products to market in the pharmaceutical, biotech, diagnostic and device sectors. He is the founder and CEO of Opes Medical Holdings Ltd., a consultancy offering strategic executive services for the development of new and innovative medical technologies and in- vitro diagnostics, accessing funding sources and commercial launch of products. Related services include corporate due diligence, market projection assessment, down-stream value strategies, implementing customized distribution strategies and deal negotiations. Opes has interests in multiple technologies and innovations which hold great commercial promise and has led investment rounds and grant applications for product development through vehicles including Horizon 2020 and the Disruptive Technology Innovation Fund.

 

Before founding OPES, Mr. McAuley held several senior level sales and commercialization positions, most recently as European Corporate Development Manager for Diploma PLC, an international group of businesses supplying specialized technical products and services to the Life Sciences sector, where he was responsible for identifying, targeting, assessing and closing company acquisitions in strategically identified geographic zones and market sectors. Prior to that, he was Sales and Commercial Director (UK & Ireland) for Technopath Distribution Ltd, an international manufacturer and distributor of clinical diagnostic products, where he more than doubled sales.

 

Mr. McAuley began his life sciences career as a nurse practitioner in ICU, surgical and trauma wards, before transitioning to the corporate side with GlaxoSmithKline. He quickly gained recognition for his sales capabilities - consistently ranking in the top 2% of GSK sales executives during his tenure - and for developing and executing record setting campaigns for a number of high-profile products, including the UK rollout of the Papilloma virus vaccine, neurological therapies for Parkinson's, smoking cessation, diabetes, depression, urology and erectile dysfunction products. Mr. McAuley earned Diplomas in Counselling and Nursing from the University of Ulster.

 

 39 

 

Dominic Schiller – Director – IP Counsel Age 58

 

Mr. Schiller is a Chartered and European Patent Attorney with over 30 years of experience, largely in the pharmaceutical, botanical and nutraceutical industries. He is the founder and CEO of Equipped 4 Holdings Limited, the parent company of Equipped 4 (IP) Limited, an Intellectual Property law practice, specializing in building patent portfolios for biotech companies, most notably GW Pharmaceuticals and Compass Pathways.

 

A pioneer in innovative pharmaceutical sectors, Mr. Schiller successfully secured some of the earliest and most prominent cannabinoid related patents for GW Pharma, helping them establish an IP portfolio comprising claims directed to plants, plant extracts, extraction technology, pharmaceutical formulations, drug delivery and the therapeutic uses of cannabinoids, as well as plant variety rights. He was also the patent attorney behind Compass Pathways, a mental health care company, where he drafted and prosecuted to grant, patents relating to a psilocybin polymorph, formulations and their medical use to treat drug resistant depression. For Phynova, a natural products company, he has secured patents for Chinese herbal products, products with Food Approvals.

  

Mr. Schiller serves as a director and/or advisor to The Life Sciences Division (an investment bank), and plays an active management role for a number of companies which he helped found. He is also an inventor on two key GW Pharmaceutical patents relating to “The use of cannabinoids in the treatment of epilepsy” and “The use of cannabinoids in the treatment of mental disorders.”

 

Mr. Schiller holds a combined honors degree in Biochemistry and Genetics from Leeds University and earned his MBA from Liverpool University.

 

Colin Stott – Chief Operating Officer and Director - Age 56

 

Mr Stott is an experienced preclinical and clinical research professional with more than 30 years’ experience in the experience in preclinical & clinical development, across a range of therapeutic indications, with specific expertise in the development of botanical medicines, particularly cannabinoid / cannabis-based medicines He is a veteran of the cannabis / cannabinoid medicines industry, with more than 20 years’ experience in the sector. He was Director of Research and Development Operations at GW Pharmaceuticals (now Jazz Pharmaceuticals) from 2001 until May 2017, and was closely involved in the development and approval of Sativex®, GW’s first licensed cannabis-based product, and the more recently NDA-approved cannabinoid (CBD) medicine for treatment-resistant epilepsy, Epidiolex®. He was also a key individual in the development of GW’s discovery and development pipeline, until 2017. As Scientific Affairs Director, he was part of the Medical Affairs team responsible for the preparation for launch of Epidyolex® in the international region (ex-US). Colin has a BSc (Hons) in Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Loughborough University of Technology) and a Diploma in Clinical Science (University of Wales).

 

From November 2020 – present, Mr. Stott has been Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Phytotherapeutix Holdings Ltd. From April 2019 – present, Mr. Stott has been Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Phytotherapeutix Ltd. From July 1, 2019 – December 1, 2020, he served as Chief Operating Officer for Alinova Biosciences Ltd. From June 1, 2017 – May 31, 2019, he served as Scientific Affairs Director, International Division for GW Pharmaceuticals plc. From January 2001 – May 31, 2017, he was R & D Operations Director for GW Pharmaceuticals plc.

 

He is an inventor on more than 20 patents in the cannabinoid medicines sector, and has more than 25 publications.

 

Hunter Land – Age 38

 

Hunter Land has over 18 years of R&D expertise across 15 different indications, as well as 10 years of cannabinoid-focused research. As an expert in the field of cannabinoid science, he has developed a pipeline of discovery work on over 20 novel cannabinoids and terpenes. Previously, Hunter acted as the Sr. Scientific Director, Director of Cannabinoid Research, and scientific spokesperson at Canopy Growth Corporation. Most notably, Hunter co-established R&D for GW Pharmaceuticals within the US, where he authored multiple protocols in refractory epilepsy (Dravet Syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome), Multiple Sclerosis, pain, and led the clinical development of Epidiolex® (FDA approved prescription CBD). Hunter acts as the Sr. Scientific Advisor for the National Hockey League Alumni Association in conjunction with NEEKA Brain Health, a board member of Veterinary Cannabis Society, and lectures at the University of Wisconsin. He has been a featured speaker at over 50 scientific conferences, a named inventor on 6 patent applications, and has over 20 publications.

  

 40 

 

Dr. Daniel Reshef - Director – Age 70

 

Dr. Daniel Reshef is an Executive Director with substantial clinical experience and demonstrated history of strategic work in the pharmaceuticals industry. Skilled in Immuno-Oncology, Oncology, Biomarkers, Epidemiology, Vaccines, Ophthalmology, and Clinical Pharmacology, he is Board certified in Ophthalmology. Dan has extensive experience in clinical, industry, and public health settings, technical skills, project management and data quality.

 

Dr. Reshef worked at Roche, Genentech and served as Therapeutic Area Lead – Immuno- Oncology at a leading pharmaceutical company. Dan has also been successfully involved in numerous entrepreneurial ventures in the past 20 years. He has been active in diverse areas such as the hotel industry, technology start- ups, Customer Relations Management (CRM), innovative novel energy sources, blockchain, cryptocurrencies and Forex. Dr. Reshef earned his MPH & PhD in Epidemiology from Johns Hopkins University.

 

Prof. Dr. Ning Qu – Age 54

 

Ning Qu was born in China in 1968. He finished his Medical School in China Medical University in 1991 (Cum Laude). He received his medical specialist training in Cardiothoracic Surgery in Shanghai Chest Hospital and University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG). He is a registered clinical practitioner both in the Netherlands and China. His strong clinical interest in cardiac surgery is Organ Transplantation (Lung) and open heart surgical intervention on Atrial Fibrillation. He got his PhD from Groningen University in Lung Transplantation Immunology, and is currently holding two professor (visiting) positions in Cardiac Surgery and Translational Medicine. He is also one of the four founding professors of Medical Academy in 2018 of Tianjin University, China.

 

David Hitchcock – Age 59

 

David Hitchcock, OBE has worked in the City of London for nearly 30 years, most recently in companies he co-founded to facilitate equity investment into UK Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). His experience concentrated particularly in the UK Life Sciences and Precision Engineering Sectors including listings onto the London Stock Exchange. David and his team bought several high precision engineering companies from administration, turning them round and creating over 200 jobs in Wales and the West of England including a standalone apprentice training centre.

David spent 21 years in Investment Banking with 10 years as a Managing Director at JPMorgan and Head of Investor Client Management. David and his team managed the bank’s most senior client relationships with its most important institutional asset managers and hedge funds in the UK and EMEA. He began his City career in Equities at Goldman Sachs in 1992.

Before entering the City David served as a British Army Officer with The Sixth (Queen Elizabeth’s Own) Gurkha Rifles.

He is a Graduate of The Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst and Pembroke College, Cambridge.

Term of Office

 

Our directors are appointed for a one-year term to hold office until the next annual general meeting of our shareholders or until removed from office in accordance with our bylaws. Our officers are appointed by our board of directors and hold office until removed by the board.

 

Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships between or among the directors, executive officers or persons nominated or chosen by us to become directors or executive officers.

 

 41 

 

Advisory Board

 

We currently do not have an advisory board, but we intend to establish one at a later date.

 

Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

 

During the past 10 years, none of our current directors, nominees for directors or current executive officers has been involved in any legal proceeding identified in Item 401(f) of Regulation S-K, including:

1. Any petition under the Federal bankruptcy laws or any state insolvency law filed by or against, or a receiver, fiscal agent or similar officer was appointed by a court for the business or property of such person, or any partnership in which he or she was a general partner at or within two years before the time of such filing, or any corporation or business association of which he or she was an executive officer at or within two years before the time of such filing;

2. Any conviction in a criminal proceeding or being named a subject of a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);

3. Being subject to any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining him or her from, or otherwise limiting, the following activities:

 

i. Acting as a futures commission merchant, introducing broker, commodity trading advisor, commodity pool operator, floor broker, leverage transaction merchant, any other person regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, or an associated person of any of the foregoing, or as an investment adviser, underwriter, broker or dealer in securities, or as an affiliated person, director or employee of any investment company, bank, savings and loan association or insurance company, or engaging in or continuing any conduct or practice in connection with such activity;

 

ii. Engaging in any type of business practice; or

iii. Engaging in any activity in connection with the purchase or sale of any security or commodity or in connection with any violation of Federal or State securities laws or Federal commodities laws;

4. Being subject to any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any Federal or State authority barring, suspending or otherwise limiting for more than 60 days the right of such person to engage in any type of business regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, securities, investment, insurance or banking activities, or to be associated with persons engaged in any such activity;

5. Being found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the SEC to have violated any Federal or State securities law, and the judgment in such civil action or finding by the Commission has not been subsequently reversed, suspended, or vacated;

6. Being found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated any Federal commodities law, and the judgment in such civil action or finding by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission has not been subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated;

 42 

 

7. Being subject to, or a party to, any Federal or State judicial or administrative order, judgment, decree, or finding, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, relating to an alleged violation of:

i. Any Federal or State securities or commodities law or regulation; or

ii. Any law or regulation respecting financial institutions or insurance companies including, but not limited to, a temporary or permanent injunction, order of disgorgement or restitution, civil money penalty or temporary or permanent cease-and-desist order, or removal or prohibition order; or

iii. Any law or regulation prohibiting mail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity; or

8. Being subject to, or a party to, any sanction or order, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization (as defined in Section 3(a)(26) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(26))), any registered entity (as defined in Section 1(a)(29) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1(a)(29))), or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has disciplinary authority over its members or persons associated with a member.

 

Committees of the Board

 

Our company currently does not have nominating or compensation committees performing similar functions nor does our company have a written nominating or compensation committee charter. Our directors believe that it is not necessary to have such committees, at this time, because the functions of such committees can be adequately performed by the board of directors.

 

We do have an Audit and Compliance Committee, with Ning Qu as Chairperson. We also have Brendan McAleer and Duncan Boxwell on the Committee. The Committee will be responsible for our accounting and financial reporting processes and the audit of our financial statements.

 

Our company does not have any defined policy or procedural requirements for shareholders to submit recommendations or nominations for directors. The board of directors believes that, given the stage of our development, a specific nominating policy would be premature and of little assistance until our business operations develop to a more advanced level. Our company does not currently have any specific or minimum criteria for the election of nominees to the board of directors and we do not have any specific process or procedure for evaluating such nominees. The board of directors will assess all candidates, whether submitted by management or shareholders, and make recommendations for election or appointment.

 

A shareholder who wishes to communicate with our board of directors may do so by directing a written request addressed to our CEO and director Seamus McAuley, at the address at our address indicated in this Form 10-K.

 

Code of Ethics

 

We have not adopted a Code of Ethics that applies to our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial officer, or controller, or persons performing similar functions.

 

 43 

 

Item 11. Executive Compensation

 

The table below summarizes all compensation awarded to, earned by, or paid to our executive officers for all services rendered in all capacities to us for the periods ended March 31, 2022 and 2021.

 

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE  
Name and principal position     Year      

Salary

($) 

     

Bonus

($) 

     Stock
Awards
($)
  Option
Awards
($)
  Non-Equity
Incentive Plan
Compensation
($)
  Nonqualified
Deferred
Compensation
Earnings
($)
  All Other
Compensation
($)
   

Total

($) 

 

Timothy Rogers

Chairman

   

2021

2022

     

0

0

     

0

0

   

0

0

 

 0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

   

0

0

 

Seamus McAuley

Chief Executive Officer

   

2021

2022

     

0

0

     

0

0

   

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

   

0

0

 

Colin Stott

Chief Operating Officer

   

2021

2022

     

0

0

     

0

0

   

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

   

0

0

 

Dominic Schiller

Chief IP Officer

   

2021

2022

     

0

0

     

0

0

   

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

   

0

0

 

Larson Elmore,

Former officer

   

2021

2022

     

0

0

     

0

0

   

5,720,000

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

   

5,720,000

0

 

Rene Lauritsen,

Former officer

   

2021

2022

     

0

0

     

0

0

   

320,000

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

   

320,000

0

 

Peter Maddocks

Former officer

   

2021

2022

     

0

0

     

0

0

   

310,000

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

   

310,000

0

   

Aubrey Oliver

Former officer

   

2021

2022

     

0

0

     

0

0

   

310,000

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

   

310,000

0

 

Dheeraj Jain

Former officer

   

2021

2022

     

0

0

     

0

0

   

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

   

0

0

 

Lalit Kumar

Former officer

   

2021

2022

     

0

0

     

0

0

   

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

 

0

0

   

0

0

 

 

 

 

 44 

 

Narrative to Summery Compensation Table 

 

Compensation was issued to four executive officers on their appointment to the Board on 20 July 2020 (Larson Elmore, former Executive Officer, Peter Maddocks former Chief Financial Officer, Rene Lauritsen, former Chief Operating Officer), and Aubrey Oliver (former Chief Medical Officer) for the year ended March 31, 2020. Larson Elmore was issued 7 million of restricted common stock, of which the total fair value equivalent on the date of issue was $5,720,000. The other three former officers and directors, were each issued 1 million of restricted common stock of which the total fair value of the stock on the date on which it was issued was $320,000 for Rene Lauritsen, and $310,000 for each of Peter Maddocks and Aubrey Oliver.

.

We have not compensated our executive officers through the date of this Form 10-K, and which will include for the year ended March 31, 2022. We expect to enter into employment agreements with executive officers for their services at some point in fiscal year ended 2023.

 

On March 28, 2021, we entered into an employment agreement with Larson Elmore. The three-year agreement provides an annual salary to Mr. Elmore of $160,000 and he shall be entitled to receive a onetime bonus equaling (10%) of salary with the financial close of financing for each plant location obtained by the company. Mr. Elmore will be entitled to an additional equity interest in the Company in the amount of (4,000,000) four million restricted shares subject to financing and vesting. Mr. Elmore is entitled to paid sick and vacation and may participate in any benefit programs we make available.

 

On September 28, 2021, our board and shareholders removed Mr. Elmore and the employment agreement terminated.

On May 4, 2022, we issued 2,250,000 shares of our common stock to our director, Mr. Michael Hunter Land, pursuant to his employment agreement dated October 18, 2021 and board decision to award him shares for his performance.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End

 

We had no outstanding equity awards at fiscal year-end.

 

Director Compensation

 

We did not pay our directors for their services to us in for the year ended March 31, 2021. We did not pay our Executive Officers for their services to us in for the year ended March 31, 2022. We did pay one of our Executive Directors, Mr. Michael Hunter Land, for his services to us under his employment agreement for the year ended March 31, 2022. We did not pay our Non-Executive Directors for their services to us in for the year ended March 31, 2022. We will compensate our Non-Executive Directors for their services in the FY 2023.

 

 45 

 

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

The following table sets forth, as of May 31, 2022, certain information as to shares of our common stock owned by (i) each person known by us to beneficially own more than 5% of our outstanding common stock, (ii) each of our directors, and (iii) all of our executive officers and directors as a group:

 

Name and Address of Beneficial Owners of Common Stock   Title of Class   Amount and Nature of Beneficial Ownership 1   % of Common Stock 2
Timothy Rogers(3)   Common Stock   180,000,000 shares     22.3%
Seamus McAuley(4)   Common Stock   30,000,000 shares     3.7%
Dominic Schiller(5)   Common Stock   180,000,000 shares     22.3%
Daniel Reshef     4,400,000 shares     Less than 1%
Ning Qu(7)   Common Stock   30,000,000 shares     3.7%
Colin Stott (8)   Common Stock    180,000,000 shares     22.3% 
Hunter Land   Common Stock   2,250,000 shares       Less than 1%
David Hitchcock   Common Stock   -     -
Officers and Directors as a Group (8 persons)   Common Stock   606,650,000 shares     75.2%
5% SHAREHOLDERS               
NONE              

  

1. As used in this table, "beneficial ownership" means the sole or shared power to vote, or to direct the voting of, a security, or the sole or shared investment power with respect to a security (i.e., the power to dispose of, or to direct the disposition of, a security). In addition, for purposes of this table, a person is deemed, as of any date, to have "beneficial ownership" of any security that such person has the right to acquire within 60 days after such date.
2. The percentage shown is based on denominator of 807,047,948 shares of common stock issued and outstanding for the company as of May 31, 2022.  
3. All shares are held in TPR Global Limited, in which Mr. Rogers has voting and investment control over the shares.  
4. All shares are held in Opes Medical Holdings Ltd., in which Mr. McAuley has voting and investment control over the shares.  
5. All shares are held in Equipped 4 Holdings Ltd, in which Mr. Schiller has voting and investment control over the shares.  
6. All shares are held in Partner Investments B.V. in which Mr. Qu has voting and investment control over the shares.  
7. All shares are held in Phytotherapeutix Holdings Ltd in which Mr. Stott has voting and investment control over the shares.   

 46 

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

Other than described below or the transactions described under the heading “Executive Compensation” (or with respect to which such information is omitted in accordance with SEC regulations), there have not been, and there is not currently proposed, any transaction or series of similar transactions to which we were or will be a participant in which the amount involved exceeded or will exceed the lesser of $120,000 or one percent of the average of our total assets at year-end for the last two completed fiscal years, and in which any director, executive officer, holder of 5% or more of any class of our capital stock or any member of the immediate family of any of the foregoing persons had or will have a direct or indirect material interest.

On January 19, 2021, we entered into an Stock Transfer Agreement (the “Agreement”) with ABTI Pharma Limited, a company registered in England and Wales (“ABTI Pharma”), pursuant to which the Company has acquired all of the outstanding shares of capital stock of ABTI Pharma from its shareholders in exchange for 600,000,000 shares of the Company pro rata to the ABTI Pharma shareholders.

On May 24, 2021, we and the shareholders of ABTI Pharma memorialized a new closing date in an amendment to the Agreement (the “Amendment”). We have already issued the 600,000,000 shares in anticipation of the closing and the transaction closed on May 28, 2021, upon the filing of our December 31, 2020 quarterly report on Form 10-Q with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Timothy Rogers, Colin Stott and Dominic Schiller received the majority of the 600,000,000 shares in the transaction.

During the period ended March 31, 2022, various related parties made advances to the company to fund operating expenses in the amount of $98,470. These advances are non – interest bearing and have no specified terms of repayment.  

 

Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services

 

Below is the table of Audit Fees billed by our auditors in connection with the audits of the Company’s financial statements for periods ended:

 

Financial Statements for the Year Ended March 31   Audit Services   Audit Related Fees   Tax Fees   Other Fees
  2022     $ 41,000     $ 5,000     $ 0     $ 0
  2021     $ 22,500     $ 10,000     $ 0     $ 0

 

 47 

 

PART IV

 

Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statements Schedules

 

(a) Financial Statements and Schedules

 

The following financial statements and schedules listed below are included in this Form 10-K.

 

Financial Statements (See Item 8)

 

Number   Exhibit Description
2.1   Stock Transfer Agreement, dated January 19, 2021 (filed as Exhibit 2.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on March 16, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference).
2.2   Amendment to Stock Transfer Agreement, dated May 24, 2021 (filed as Exhibit 2.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on May 25, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference).
2.3   Asset Purchase Agreement, dated November 9, 2021 (filed as Exhibit 2.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on December 3, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference).
3.1   Articles of Incorporation, dated July 16, 2008 (filed as Exhibit 3.1 to the Form S-1 filed with the SEC on December 12, 2008 and incorporated herein by reference).
3.2   Certificate of Amendment, dated October 26, 2020 (filed as Exhibit 3.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on October 28, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference).
3.3   Certificate of Designation (filed as Exhibit 3.4 to the Annual Report on Form 10-KT filed with the SEC on June 9, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference).
3.4   Amended and Restated Bylaws (filed as Exhibit 3.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on October 28, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference).
4.1   Common Stock Purchase Warrant, dated August 11, 2021 (filed as Exhibit 4.1 to the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on August 19, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference).
4.2   Convertible Promissory Note, dated June 8, 2021 (filed as Exhibit 4.1 to the Annual Report on Form 10-KT filed with the SEC on June 9, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference).
10.1   Common Stock Purchase Agreement, dated August 11, 2021 (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on August 19, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference).
10.2   Registration Rights Agreement, dated August 11, 2021 (filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on August 19, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference).
10.3   Employment Agreement, dated March 28, 2021 (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Annual Report on Form 10-KT filed with the SEC on June 9, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference).
99.1   Audit and Complaince Committee Charter (filed as Exhibit 99.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on October 5, 2021
31.1   Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Securities Exchange Act Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a), as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
31.2   Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Securities Exchange Act Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a), as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.1   Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
     
101.INS   XBRL Instance Document*
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema*
101.CAL   XBRL Taxonomy Calculation Linkbase*
101.LAB   XBRL Taxonomy Label Linkbase*
101.PRE   XBRL Definition Linkbase Document*
101.DEF   XBRL Definition Linkbase Document*

 

* Filed Herewith 

 

 Item 16. Form 10-K Summary.

 

None.

 

 48 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

Alterola Biotech, Inc.

 

By: /s/ Timothy Rogers 

Timothy Rogers

Chairman, Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer, Principal Accounting Officer and Director

 

By: /s/ Seamus McAuley

Seamus McAuley

Chief Executive Officer, Company Secretary and Director

 

By: /s/ Colin Stott

Colin Stott

Chief Operating Officer and Director

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

By: /s/ Timothy Rogers
Timothy Rogers
Chairman, Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer, Principal Accounting Officer and Director,

Signature: /s/ Timothy Rogers

 

 

Date: June 10, 2022

 
By: /s/ Seamus McAuley
Seamus McAuley
Chief Executive Officer, Company Secretary and Director

Signature: /s/ Seamus McAulley

 

 

Date: June 10, 2022

 
By: /s/ Colin Stott
Colin Stott
Chief Operting Officer and Director

Signature: /s/ Colin Stott

 

 

Date: June 10, 2022

 
By: /s/ Dominic Schiller
Dominic Schiller Director

Signature:

 

 

Date: June 10, 2022

   
By: /s/ Michael Hunter Land
Michael Hunter Land Director

Signature: /s/ Michael Hunter Land

 

 

Date: June 10, 2022

 
 
By: /s/ Daniel Reshef
Daniel Reshef Director

Signature: /s/ Daniel Reshef

 

 

Date: June 10, 2022

 
By: /s/ Ning Qu
Ning Qu Director

Signature: /s/ Ning Qu

 

 

Date: June 10, 2022

 

By: /s/ David Hitchcock
Ning David Hitchcock

Signature: /s/ David Hitchcock

 

 

Date: June 10, 2022

 

 49 

 

 

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Alterola Biotech Inc. provided additional information to their SEC Filing as exhibits

Ticker: ABTI
CIK: 1442999
Form Type: 10-K Annual Report
Accession Number: 0001663577-22-000372
Submitted to the SEC: Fri Jun 10 2022 5:08:48 PM EST
Accepted by the SEC: Fri Jun 10 2022
Period: Thursday, March 31, 2022
Industry: Metal Mining

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