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Federal Home Loan Bank Of Cincinnati (1326771) SEC Filing 10-Q Quarterly Report for the period ending Thursday, March 31, 2022

Federal Home Loan Bank Of Cincinnati

CIK: 1326771

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Contact:
News Release
Laura Gaffin, FHLB Cincinnati
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
513.852.7086 (office) or 513.265.5431 (cell)
April 26, 2022
    
FHLB CINCINNATI ANNOUNCES FIRST QUARTER 2022 RESULTS

Cincinnati, Ohio – The Federal Home Loan Bank of Cincinnati (the FHLB) today released unaudited financial results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2022.
Operating Results
For the first quarter, net income was $16 million and return on average equity (ROE) was 1.48 percent. This compares to net income of $19 million and ROE of 1.96 percent for the same period of 2021. The decline in profitability in the first three months of 2022 compared to the same period of 2021 was primarily due to unrealized losses on certain derivatives and other financial instruments carried at fair value. This decline in profitability was partially offset by an increase in net interest income resulting from lower premium amortization in the first quarter of 2022. Premium amortization declined because of lower volumes of mortgage refinance activity given the increase in mortgage rates.

Balance Sheet Highlights
Total assets at March 31, 2022 were $79.3 billion, an increase of $18.7 billion (31 percent) from year-end 2021.
Mission Assets and Activities – comprising major activities with members including Advances, Letters of Credit (off-balance sheet), and the Mortgage Purchase Program – was $74.9 billion at March 31, 2022, an increase of $9.7 billion (15 percent) from year-end 2021. The growth in Mission Assets and Activities was primarily driven by a $10.7 billion increase in Advance balances. The increase in Advances was primarily due to a few large-asset members accessing temporary liquidity because of uncertainties in the financial markets. Despite the increase in Advances, demand for Advances continues to be impacted by the unprecedented amount of liquidity in the financial markets as a result of governmental stimulus actions in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Total investments at March 31, 2022 were $37.8 billion, an increase of $8.4 billion from year-end 2021, which was primarily driven by higher liquidity investments. Total investments included $11.8 billion of mortgage-backed securities and $26.0 billion of liquidity investments. The increase in liquidity investments was driven by maturities and prepayments of Advances near the end of the first quarter of 2022, and the related funds were temporarily invested in short-term liquidity instruments. The FHLB uses its liquidity portfolio to ensure it can meet the borrowing needs of members and to meet all current and anticipated financial commitments.
The FHLB exceeded all minimum regulatory capital and liquidity requirements. On March 31, 2022, GAAP capital was $4.3 billion, an increase of 13 percent from year-end 2021. The GAAP and
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The following information was filed by Federal Home Loan Bank Of Cincinnati on Tuesday, April 26, 2022 as an 8K 2.02 statement, which is an earnings press release pertaining to results of operations and financial condition. It may be helpful to assess the quality of management by comparing the information in the press release to the information in the accompanying 10-Q Quarterly Report statement of earnings and operation as management may choose to highlight particular information in the press release.

 
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-Q
 QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2022
or
 TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from __________ to __________.
Commission File No. 000-51399
FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Federally chartered corporation of the United States
31-6000228
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
600 Atrium Two, P.O. Box 598, Cincinnati, Ohio
45201-0598
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)

(513) 852-7500
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Yes    No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).
Yes    No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated Filer 
Accelerated Filer 
Non-accelerated FilerSmaller reporting company
Emerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
Yes   No
The capital stock of the registrant is not listed on any securities exchange or quoted on any automated quotation system, only may be owned by members and former members and is transferable only at its par value of $100 per share. As of April 30, 2022, the registrant had 31,973,859 shares of capital stock outstanding, which included stock classified as mandatorily redeemable.
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Table of Contents
PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1.Financial Statements (Unaudited):
Statements of Condition - March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021
Statements of Income - Three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021
Statements of Comprehensive Income - Three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021
Statements of Capital - Three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021
Statements of Cash Flows - Three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021
Notes to Unaudited Financial Statements
Item 2.Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 3.Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 4.Controls and Procedures
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION
Item 1.Legal Proceedings
Item 1A.Risk Factors
Item 2.Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
Item 3.Defaults Upon Senior Securities
Item 4.Mine Safety Disclosures
Item 5.Other Information
Item 6.Exhibits
Signatures
2

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1.     Financial Statements.

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
STATEMENTS OF CONDITION
(Unaudited)

(In thousands, except par value)
 March 31, 2022 December 31, 2021
ASSETS   
Cash and due from banks$21,898  $167,822 
Interest-bearing deposits435,047  340,147 
Securities purchased under agreements to resell6,024,560  1,282,440 
Federal funds sold8,059,000  5,505,000 
Investment securities:
Trading securities 6,050,632  6,780,817 
Available-for-sale securities (amortized cost of $6,310,883 and $5,240,998 at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively)
6,299,236  5,267,123 
Held-to-maturity securities (includes $0 and $0 pledged as collateral at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively, that may be repledged) (a)
10,904,822  10,216,756 
Total investment securities23,254,690 22,264,696 
Advances (includes $24,365 and $25,805 at fair value under fair value option at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively)
33,528,853  23,054,748 
Mortgage loans held for portfolio, net of allowance for credit losses of $238 and $233 at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively
7,555,457  7,588,184 
Accrued interest receivable113,677  88,672 
Derivative assets 318,159  297,736 
Other assets, net24,515  28,140 
TOTAL ASSETS$79,335,856  $60,617,585 
LIABILITIES   
Deposits $1,510,088  $1,415,651 
Consolidated Obligations:    
Discount Notes (includes $5,063,294 and $10,420,974 at fair value under fair value option at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively)
31,650,657  29,837,696 
Bonds (includes $4,274,440 and $7,175,060 at fair value under fair value option at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively)
40,015,698  24,601,838 
Total Consolidated Obligations71,666,355  54,439,534 
Mandatorily redeemable capital stock 528,881  21,211 
Accrued interest payable57,152  60,682 
Affordable Housing Program payable 80,403  84,504 
Derivative liabilities 1,766  3,291 
Other liabilities1,218,312  796,811 
Total liabilities75,062,957  56,821,684 
Commitments and contingencies
CAPITAL    
Capital stock Class B putable ($100 par value); issued and outstanding shares: 30,005 shares at March 31, 2022 and 24,900 shares at December 31, 2021
3,000,535  2,490,016 
Retained earnings:
Unrestricted783,592 783,072 
Restricted512,941 509,719 
Total retained earnings1,296,533  1,292,791 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (24,169) 13,094 
Total capital4,272,899  3,795,901 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL$79,335,856  $60,617,585 
(a)Fair values: $10,818,201 and $10,269,821 at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
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FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(Unaudited)

(In thousands)Three Months Ended March 31,
 2022 2021
INTEREST INCOME:   
Advances$45,318  $41,160 
Prepayment fees on Advances, net2,699  1,340 
Interest-bearing deposits179  217 
Securities purchased under agreements to resell928  214 
Federal funds sold3,225  1,342 
Investment securities:
Trading securities37,826  58,052 
Available-for-sale securities5,018  1,335 
Held-to-maturity securities23,908 29,731 
Total investment securities66,752 89,118 
Mortgage loans held for portfolio48,576  44,414 
Total interest income167,677  177,805 
INTEREST EXPENSE:   
Consolidated Obligations:
Discount Notes10,802  5,468 
Bonds75,075  96,186 
Total Consolidated Obligations85,877 101,654 
Deposits179  151 
Mandatorily redeemable capital stock831  94 
Total interest expense86,887  101,899 
NET INTEREST INCOME80,790  75,906 
NON-INTEREST INCOME (LOSS):   
Net gains (losses) on investment securities(160,163)(138,860)
Net gains (losses) on financial instruments held under fair value option
18,678 3,905 
Net gains (losses) on derivatives97,105  97,144 
Letters of Credit fees6,161 5,811 
Other, net1,026  435 
Total non-interest income (loss)(37,193) (31,565)
NON-INTEREST EXPENSE:   
Compensation and benefits14,106  12,903 
Other operating expenses6,162  5,952 
Finance Agency1,797  1,879 
Office of Finance1,759  1,271 
Other1,779  1,518 
Total non-interest expense25,603  23,523 
INCOME BEFORE ASSESSMENTS17,994  20,818 
Affordable Housing Program assessments1,883  2,091 
NET INCOME$16,111  $18,727 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
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FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(Unaudited)

(In thousands)Three Months Ended March 31,
20222021
Net income$16,111 $18,727 
Other comprehensive income adjustments:
Net unrealized gains (losses) on available-for-sale securities
(37,772)2,687 
Pension and postretirement benefits509 676 
Total other comprehensive income (loss) adjustments
(37,263)3,363 
Comprehensive income (loss)$(21,152)$22,090 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

5

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
STATEMENTS OF CAPITAL
(Unaudited)
(In thousands)Capital Stock
Class B - Putable
Retained EarningsAccumulated Other ComprehensiveTotal
 SharesPar ValueUnrestrictedRestrictedTotalLossCapital
BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 202026,409 $2,640,863 $802,715 $501,321 $1,304,036 $(14,985)$3,929,914 
Comprehensive income (loss)14,982 3,745 18,727 3,363 22,090 
Proceeds from sale of capital stock3,760 376,078 376,078 
Repurchase of capital stock(2,680)(268,000)(268,000)
Net shares reclassified to mandatorily redeemable capital stock(10)(1,003)(1,003)
Cash dividends on capital stock(13,891)(13,891)(13,891)
BALANCE, MARCH 31, 202127,479 $2,747,938 $803,806 $505,066 $1,308,872 $(11,622)$4,045,188 
BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 202124,900 $2,490,016 $783,072 $509,719 $1,292,791 $13,094 $3,795,901 
Comprehensive income (loss)  12,889 3,222 16,111 (37,263)(21,152)
Proceeds from sale of capital stock19,117 1,911,678  1,911,678 
Net shares reclassified to mandatorily redeemable capital stock(14,012)(1,401,159) (1,401,159)
Cash dividends on capital stock  (12,369)(12,369) (12,369)
BALANCE, MARCH 31, 202230,005 $3,000,535 $783,592 $512,941 $1,296,533 $(24,169)$4,272,899 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
6

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)

(In thousands)Three Months Ended March 31,
 2022 2021
OPERATING ACTIVITIES:   
Net income$16,111  $18,727 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:
   
Depreciation and amortization/(accretion)16,717  20,233 
Net change in derivative and hedging activities
519,136  90,177 
Net change in fair value adjustments on trading securities160,163  138,860 
Net change in fair value adjustments on financial instruments held under fair value option
(18,678)(3,905)
Other adjustments, net229  223 
Net change in:  
Accrued interest receivable(25,005) (8,968)
Other assets2,774  2,746 
Accrued interest payable(3,232) (18,542)
Other liabilities(9,128) (9,436)
Total adjustments642,976  211,388 
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities659,087  230,115 
INVESTING ACTIVITIES:   
Net change in:   
Interest-bearing deposits(88,866) 300,462 
Securities purchased under agreements to resell(4,742,120) 1,529,968 
Federal funds sold(2,554,000) (565,000)
Premises, software, and equipment65  (252)
Trading securities:   
Proceeds from maturities and paydowns570,023  750,038 
Proceeds from sales— 14,008 
Available-for-sale securities:   
Purchases(1,388,983)— 
Held-to-maturity securities:   
Proceeds from maturities and paydowns484,292  777,871 
Purchases(758,598) (40,483)
Advances:   
Repaid201,519,184  49,540,950 
Originated(212,214,458) (48,690,088)
Mortgage loans held for portfolio:   
Principal collected415,176  1,165,828 
Purchases(399,702) (247,646)
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities(19,157,987) 4,535,656 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.
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(continued from previous page)
FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI
STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)
(In thousands)Three Months Ended March 31,
2022 2021
FINANCING ACTIVITIES:   
Net change in deposits and pass-through reserves$95,227  $76,707 
Net proceeds from issuance of Consolidated Obligations:   
Discount Notes69,619,730  48,587,907 
Bonds22,046,918  9,575,470 
Payments for maturing and retiring Consolidated Obligations:   
Discount Notes(67,804,719) (49,208,016)
Bonds(6,610,000) (13,757,000)
Proceeds from issuance of capital stock1,911,678  376,078 
Payments for repurchase of capital stock
— (268,000)
Payments for repurchase/redemption of mandatorily redeemable capital stock
(893,489) (5,127)
Cash dividends paid(12,369) (13,891)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities18,352,976  (4,635,872)
Net increase (decrease) in cash and due from banks(145,924) 129,899 
Cash and due from banks at beginning of the period167,822  2,984,073 
Cash and due from banks at end of the period$21,898  $3,113,972 
Supplemental Disclosures:   
Interest paid$86,318  $123,211 
Affordable Housing Program payments, net$5,984  $4,621 


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

8

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF CINCINNATI

NOTES TO UNAUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


Background Information    

The Federal Home Loan Bank of Cincinnati (the FHLB), a federally chartered corporation, is one of 11 District Federal Home Loan Banks (FHLBanks). The FHLBanks are government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs) that serve the public by enhancing the availability of credit for residential mortgages and targeted community development. The FHLB is regulated by the Federal Housing Finance Agency (Finance Agency).

Note 1 - Basis of Presentation

The accompanying interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP). The preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP requires management to make assumptions and estimates. These assumptions and estimates affect the reported amount of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities, and the reported amounts of income and expenses. Actual results could differ from these estimates. The interim financial statements presented are unaudited, but they include all adjustments (consisting of only normal recurring adjustments) which are, in the opinion of management, necessary for a fair statement of the financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows for such periods. These financial statements do not include all disclosures associated with annual financial statements and accordingly should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements and notes included in the FHLB's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Results for the three months ended March 31, 2022 are not necessarily indicative of operating results for the full year.

The FHLB presents certain financial instruments, including derivative instruments and securities purchased under agreements to resell, on a net basis when it has a legal right of offset and all other requirements for netting are met (collectively referred to as the netting requirements). For these instruments, the FHLB has elected to offset its asset and liability positions, as well as cash collateral received or pledged, when it has met the netting requirements. The FHLB did not have any offsetting liabilities related to its securities purchased under agreements to resell for the periods presented.

The net exposure for these financial instruments can change on a daily basis; therefore, there may be a delay between the time this exposure change is identified and additional collateral is requested, and the time this collateral is received or pledged. Likewise, there may be a delay for excess collateral to be returned. For derivative instruments that meet the requirements for netting, any excess cash collateral received or pledged is recognized as a derivative liability or derivative asset. Additional information regarding these agreements is provided in Note 6. Based on the fair value of the related collateral held, the securities purchased under agreements to resell were fully collateralized for the periods presented. For more information about the FHLB's investments in securities purchased under agreements to resell, see “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data - Note 1 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” in the FHLB's 2021 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Subsequent Events

The FHLB has evaluated subsequent events for potential recognition or disclosure through the issuance of these financial statements and believes there have been no material subsequent events requiring additional disclosure or recognition in these financial statements.


Note 2 - Recently Issued and Adopted Accounting Guidance

Troubled Debt Restructurings and Vintage Disclosures. On March 31, 2022, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued guidance that eliminates the accounting guidance for troubled debt restructurings by creditors that have adopted the current expected credit losses methodology while enhancing disclosure requirements for certain loan refinancings and restructurings by creditors made to borrowers experiencing financial difficulty. Additionally, this guidance requires disclosure of current-period gross write-offs by year of origination for financing receivables and net investment in leases. The guidance becomes effective for the FHLB for the interim and annual periods beginning on January 1, 2023. Early adoption is permitted. The FHLB does not intend to adopt this guidance early. The FHLB is in the process of evaluating this guidance, and its effect on the FHLB’s financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows has not yet been determined.
9


Fair Value Hedging - Portfolio Layer Method. On March 28, 2022, the FASB issued guidance that expands fair value hedging under the current last-of-layer method by allowing multiple hedged layers of a single closed portfolio under the method. To reflect that expansion, the last-of-layer method is renamed the portfolio layer method. Additionally, among other things, this guidance (1) expands the scope of the portfolio layer method to include nonprepayable assets, (2) specifies eligible hedging instruments in a single-layer hedge, (3) provides additional guidance on the accounting for and disclosure of hedge basis adjustments under the portfolio layer method, and (4) specifies how hedge basis adjustments should be considered when determining credit losses for the assets included in the closed portfolio. The guidance becomes effective for the FHLB for the interim and annual periods beginning on January 1, 2023. Early adoption is permitted. The FHLB does not intend to adopt this guidance early. The FHLB is in the process of evaluating this guidance, and its effect on the FHLB’s financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows has not yet been determined.

Facilitation of the Effects of Reference Rate Reform on Financial Reporting, as amended. On March 12, 2020, the FASB issued temporary, optional guidance to ease the potential burden in accounting for reference rate reform. The new guidance provides optional expedients and exceptions for applying GAAP to transactions affected by reference rate reform if certain criteria are met. The transactions primarily include (1) contract modifications, (2) hedging relationships, and (3) sale and/or transfer of debt securities classified as held-to-maturity. This guidance became effective immediately, and the FHLB may elect to apply the amendments through December 31, 2022. The FHLB either elected or plans to elect the majority of the optional expedients and exceptions provided, and the effect on the FHLB's financial condition, results of operations and cash flows is not expected to be material. In particular, during the fourth quarter of 2021, the FHLB elected optional practical expedients specific to fair value hedging relationships, which did not have a material effect.


Note 3 - Investments

The FHLB makes short-term investments in interest-bearing deposits, securities purchased under agreements to resell, and Federal funds sold and may make other investments in debt securities, which are classified as either trading, available-for-sale, or held-to-maturity.

Interest-Bearing Deposits, Securities Purchased under Agreements to Resell, and Federal Funds Sold

The FHLB invests in interest-bearing deposits, securities purchased under agreements to resell, and Federal funds sold to provide short-term liquidity. These investments are transacted with counterparties that have received a credit rating of single-A or greater by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization (NRSRO). The FHLB’s internal ratings of these counterparties may differ from those issued by an NRSRO.

Federal funds sold are unsecured loans that are generally transacted on an overnight term. Finance Agency regulations include a limit on the amount of unsecured credit the FHLB may extend to a counterparty. At March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, all investments in interest-bearing deposits and Federal funds sold were repaid or expected to be repaid according to the contractual terms. No allowance for credit losses was recorded for these assets at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021. Carrying values of interest-bearing deposits and Federal funds sold exclude accrued interest receivable of (in thousands) $92 and $72 as of March 31, 2022, and $1 and $10 as of December 31, 2021.

Securities purchased under agreements to resell are short-term and are structured such that they are evaluated regularly to determine if the market value of the underlying securities decreases below the market value required as collateral (i.e., subject to collateral maintenance provisions). If so, the counterparty must place an equivalent amount of additional securities as collateral or remit an equivalent amount of cash, generally by the next business day. Based upon the collateral held as security and collateral maintenance provisions with counterparties, the FHLB determined that no allowance for credit losses was needed for its securities purchased under agreements to resell at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021. The carrying value of securities purchased under agreements to resell excludes accrued interest receivable of (in thousands) $70 and $10 as of March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, respectively.

Debt Securities

The FHLB invests in debt securities, which are classified as either trading, available-for-sale, or held-to-maturity. The FHLB is prohibited by Finance Agency regulations from purchasing certain higher-risk securities, such as equity securities and debt instruments that are not investment quality, other than certain investments targeted at low-income persons or communities and instruments that experienced credit deterioration after their purchase by the FHLB.

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Trading Securities

Table 3.1 - Trading Securities by Major Security Types (in thousands)
Fair ValueMarch 31, 2022 December 31, 2021
Non-mortgage-backed securities (non-MBS):
U.S. Treasury obligations$4,412,952 $5,030,946 
GSE obligations1,637,495  1,749,661 
Total non-MBS6,050,447 6,780,607 
Mortgage-backed securities (MBS):   
U.S. obligation single-family185  210 
Total MBS185 210 
Total$6,050,632  $6,780,817 

Table 3.2 - Net Gains (Losses) on Trading Securities (in thousands)
Three Months Ended March 31,
 20222021
Net unrealized gains (losses) on trading securities held at period end$(158,514)$(135,239)
Net gains (losses) on trading securities sold/matured during the period(1,649)(3,621)
Net gains (losses) on trading securities$(160,163)$(138,860)

Available-for-Sale Securities

Table 3.3 - Available-for-Sale Securities by Major Security Types (in thousands)
 March 31, 2022
 
Amortized
Cost (1)
 Gross
Unrealized
Gains
 Gross
Unrealized
Losses
 Fair
Value
Non-MBS:
U.S. Treasury obligations$5,214,648  $2,483  $(2,865)$5,214,266 
GSE obligations125,850 1,455 — 127,305 
Total non-MBS5,340,498 3,938 (2,865)5,341,571 
MBS:
GSE multi-family970,385 704 (13,424)957,665 
Total MBS970,385 704 (13,424)957,665 
Total$6,310,883 $4,642 $(16,289)$6,299,236 
 December 31, 2021
 
Amortized
Cost (1)
 Gross
Unrealized
Gains
 Gross
Unrealized
Losses
 Fair
Value
Non-MBS:
U.S. Treasury obligations$4,475,664  $23,206  $— $4,498,870 
GSE obligations133,058 2,250 — 135,308 
Total non-MBS4,608,722 25,456 — 4,634,178 
MBS:
GSE multi-family632,276 2,961 (2,292)632,945 
Total MBS632,276 2,961 (2,292)632,945 
Total$5,240,998 $28,417 $(2,292)$5,267,123 
(1)Amortized cost of available-for-sale securities includes adjustments made to the cost basis of an investment for accretion, amortization, and/or fair value hedge accounting adjustments, and excludes accrued interest receivable of (in thousands) $16,589 and $13,014 at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021.
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Table 3.4 summarizes the available-for-sale securities with unrealized losses, which are aggregated by major security type and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position.

Table 3.4 - Available-for-Sale Securities in a Continuous Unrealized Loss Position (in thousands)
March 31, 2022
Less than 12 Months12 Months or moreTotal
 Fair ValueGross Unrealized LossesFair ValueGross Unrealized LossesFair ValueGross Unrealized Losses
Non-MBS:
U.S. Treasury obligations$2,560,398 $(2,865)$— $— $2,560,398 $(2,865)
Total non-MBS2,560,398 (2,865)— — 2,560,398 (2,865)
MBS:
GSE multi-family MBS720,947 (13,424)— — 720,947 (13,424)
Total MBS720,947 (13,424)— — 720,947 (13,424)
Total$3,281,345 $(16,289)$— $— $3,281,345 $(16,289)
December 31, 2021
Less than 12 Months12 Months or moreTotal
Fair ValueGross Unrealized LossesFair ValueGross Unrealized LossesFair ValueGross Unrealized Losses
GSE multi-family MBS$489,983 $(2,292)$— $— $489,983 $(2,292)
Total $489,983 $(2,292)$— $— $489,983 $(2,292)

Table 3.5 - Available-for-Sale Securities by Contractual Maturity (in thousands)
 March 31, 2022 December 31, 2021
Year of MaturityAmortized
Cost
 Fair
Value
 Amortized
Cost
 Fair
Value
Non-MBS:
Due in 1 year or less$—  $—  $—  $— 
Due after 1 year through 5 years1,397,700 1,399,172 81,194 82,185 
Due after 5 years through 10 years3,931,257 3,930,555 4,515,054 4,538,945 
Due after 10 years11,541 11,844 12,474 13,048 
Total non-MBS5,340,498 5,341,571 4,608,722 4,634,178 
MBS (1)
970,385 957,665 632,276 632,945 
Total$6,310,883 $6,299,236 $5,240,998 $5,267,123 
(1)MBS are not presented by contractual maturity because their expected maturities will likely differ from contractual maturities because borrowers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment fees.

Table 3.6 - Interest Rate Payment Terms of Available-for-Sale Securities (in thousands)
 March 31, 2022 December 31, 2021
Amortized cost of non-MBS:   
Fixed-rate$5,340,498  $4,608,722 
Total amortized cost of non-MBS5,340,498 4,608,722 
Amortized cost of MBS:
Fixed-rate970,385 632,276 
Total amortized cost of MBS970,385 632,276 
Total$6,310,883 $5,240,998 

The FHLB had no sales of securities out of its available-for-sale portfolio for the three months ended March 31, 2022 or 2021.
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Held-to-Maturity Securities

Table 3.7 - Held-to-Maturity Securities by Major Security Types (in thousands)
March 31, 2022
Amortized Cost (1)
Gross Unrecognized Holding
Gains
Gross Unrecognized Holding LossesFair Value
Non-MBS:
U.S. Treasury obligations
$46,045 $— $(47)$45,998 
Total non-MBS46,045 — (47)45,998 
MBS:    
U.S. obligation single-family1,068,549 472 (53,984)1,015,037 
GSE single-family1,707,129 6,186 (34,256)1,679,059 
GSE multi-family8,083,099 3,623 (8,615)8,078,107 
Total MBS10,858,777 10,281 (96,855)10,772,203 
Total$10,904,822 $10,281 $(96,902)$10,818,201 
 
 December 31, 2021
 
Amortized Cost (1)
Gross Unrecognized Holding
Gains
Gross Unrecognized Holding LossesFair Value
Non-MBS:
U.S. Treasury obligations$46,879 $— $— $46,879 
Total non-MBS46,879 — — 46,879 
MBS:   
U.S. obligation single-family1,056,729 11,553 (8,337)1,059,945 
GSE single-family1,860,197 49,026 — 1,909,223 
GSE multi-family7,252,951 4,841 (4,018)7,253,774 
Total MBS10,169,877 65,420 (12,355)10,222,942 
Total$10,216,756 $65,420 $(12,355)$10,269,821 
 
(1)Carrying value equals amortized cost. Amortized cost of held-to-maturity securities includes adjustments made to the cost basis of an investment for accretion and amortization and excludes accrued interest receivable of (in thousands) $7,732 and $7,461 as of March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021.

Table 3.8 - Held-to-Maturity Securities by Contractual Maturity (in thousands)
March 31, 2022December 31, 2021
Year of Maturity
Amortized Cost (1)
Fair Value
Amortized Cost (1)
Fair Value
Non-MBS:    
Due in 1 year or less$46,045 $45,998 $46,879 $46,879 
Due after 1 year through 5 years— — — — 
Due after 5 years through 10 years— — — — 
Due after 10 years— — — — 
Total non-MBS46,045 45,998 46,879 46,879 
MBS (2)
10,858,777 10,772,203 10,169,877 10,222,942 
Total$10,904,822 $10,818,201 $10,216,756 $10,269,821 
(1)Carrying value equals amortized cost.
(2)MBS are not presented by contractual maturity because their expected maturities will likely differ from contractual maturities because borrowers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment fees.
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Table 3.9 - Interest Rate Payment Terms of Held-to-Maturity Securities (in thousands)
 March 31, 2022December 31, 2021
Amortized cost of non-MBS:   
Fixed-rate$46,045  $46,879 
Total amortized cost of non-MBS46,045  46,879 
Amortized cost of MBS:   
Fixed-rate2,594,377  2,718,127 
Variable-rate8,264,400  7,451,750 
Total amortized cost of MBS10,858,777  10,169,877 
Total$10,904,822  $10,216,756 

From time to time the FHLB may sell securities out of its held-to-maturity portfolio. These securities, generally, have less than 15 percent of the acquired principal outstanding at the time of the sale. These sales are considered maturities for the purposes of security classification. For the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021, the FHLB did not sell any held-to-maturity securities.
Allowance for Credit Losses on Available-for-Sale and Held-to-Maturity Securities

The FHLB evaluates available-for-sale and held-to-maturity investment securities for credit losses on a quarterly basis. The FHLB’s available-for-sale and held-to-maturity securities are U.S. Treasury obligations, GSE obligations, and MBS issued by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and Ginnie Mae that are backed by single-family or multi-family mortgage loans. The FHLB only purchases securities considered investment quality. At March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, all available-for-sale and held-to-maturity securities were rated single-A, or above, by an NRSRO, based on the lowest long-term credit rating for each security used by the FHLB. The FHLB’s internal ratings of these securities may differ from those obtained from an NRSRO.

The FHLB evaluates individual available-for-sale securities for impairment by comparing the security’s fair value to its amortized cost. Impairment may exist when the fair value of the investment is less than its amortized cost (i.e., in an unrealized loss position). At March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, certain available-for-sale securities were in an unrealized loss position. These losses are considered temporary as the FHLB expects to recover the entire amortized cost basis on these available-for-sale investment securities and does not intend to sell these securities nor considers it more likely than not that it will be required to sell these securities before the anticipated recovery of each security's remaining amortized cost basis. Further, the FHLB has not experienced any payment defaults on the instruments. In addition, all of these securities carry an implicit or explicit government guarantee. As a result, no allowance for credit losses was recorded on these available-for-sale securities at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021.

The FHLB evaluates its held-to-maturity securities for impairment on a collective, or pooled basis, unless an individual assessment is deemed necessary because the securities do not possess similar risk characteristics. As of March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, the FHLB had not established an allowance for credit loss on any held-to-maturity securities because the securities: (1) were all highly-rated and/or had short remaining terms to maturity, (2) had not experienced, nor did the FHLB expect, any payment default on the instruments, and (3) in the case of U.S., GSE, or other agency obligations, carry an implicit or explicit government guarantee such that the FHLB considered the risk of nonpayment to be zero.


Note 4 - Advances

The FHLB offers a wide range of fixed- and variable-rate Advance products with different maturities, interest rates, payment characteristics and optionality. The following table presents Advance redemptions by contractual maturity, including index-amortizing Advances, which are presented according to their predetermined amortization schedules.

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Table 4.1 - Advances by Redemption Term (dollars in thousands)
March 31, 2022December 31, 2021
Redemption TermAmountWeighted Average Interest
Rate
AmountWeighted Average Interest
Rate
Due in 1 year or less$22,305,863 0.50 %$11,608,264 0.49 %
Due after 1 year through 2 years1,961,802 2.21 1,451,741 2.06 
Due after 2 years through 3 years1,568,416 1.58 1,832,622 1.89 
Due after 3 years through 4 years3,505,813 1.05 2,486,809 0.97 
Due after 4 years through 5 years1,327,598 1.20 2,168,145 0.98 
Thereafter2,980,201 1.74 3,406,837 1.49 
Total principal amount33,649,693 0.85 22,954,418 0.95 
Commitment fees(122) (156) 
Discount on Affordable Housing Program (AHP) Advances
(1,130) (1,382) 
Discounts(1,679) (1,838) 
Hedging adjustments(115,774) 104,401  
Fair value option valuation adjustments and accrued interest
(2,135)(695)
Total (1)
$33,528,853  $23,054,748  
(1)Carrying values exclude accrued interest receivable of (in thousands) $21,095 and $18,823 as of March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021.

The FHLB offers certain fixed and variable-rate Advances to members that may be prepaid on specified dates (call dates) without incurring prepayment or termination fees (callable Advances). If the call option is exercised, replacement funding may be available to members. Other Advances may only be prepaid subject to a prepayment fee paid to the FHLB that makes the FHLB financially indifferent to the prepayment of the Advance.

Table 4.2 - Advances by Redemption Term or Next Call Date (in thousands)
Redemption Term or Next Call DateMarch 31, 2022December 31, 2021
Due in 1 year or less$25,334,764 $14,642,697 
Due after 1 year through 2 years1,937,752 1,444,659 
Due after 2 years through 3 years1,566,865 1,809,871 
Due after 3 years through 4 years524,013 1,003,709 
Due after 4 years through 5 years1,327,598 668,145 
Thereafter2,958,701 3,385,337 
Total principal amount$33,649,693 $22,954,418 

The FHLB also offers putable Advances. With a putable Advance, the FHLB effectively purchases put options from the member that allows the FHLB to terminate the Advance at predetermined dates. The FHLB normally would exercise its put option when interest rates increase relative to contractual rates.

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Table 4.3 - Advances by Redemption Term or Next Put Date for Putable Advances (in thousands)
Redemption Term or Next Put DateMarch 31, 2022December 31, 2021
Due in 1 year or less$24,638,113 $13,995,514 
Due after 1 year through 2 years1,961,802 1,511,741 
Due after 2 years through 3 years1,544,166 1,818,372 
Due after 3 years through 4 years3,505,813 2,471,809 
Due after 4 years through 5 years708,598 2,160,145 
Thereafter1,291,201 996,837 
Total principal amount$33,649,693 $22,954,418 

Table 4.4 - Advances by Interest Rate Payment Terms (in thousands)                    
March 31, 2022December 31, 2021
Total fixed-rate (1)
$29,757,964 $19,372,859 
Total variable-rate (1)
3,891,729 3,581,559 
Total principal amount$33,649,693 $22,954,418 
(1)Payment terms based on current interest rate terms, which reflect any option exercises or rate conversions that have occurred subsequent to the related Advance issuance.

Credit Risk Exposure and Security Terms

The FHLB's Advances are made to member financial institutions. The FHLB manages its credit exposure to Advances through an integrated approach that includes establishing a credit limit for each borrower and ongoing review of each borrower's financial condition, coupled with collateral and lending policies to limit risk of loss while balancing borrowers' needs for a reliable source of funding.

In addition, the FHLB lends to eligible borrowers in accordance with federal law and Finance Agency regulations, which require the FHLB to obtain sufficient collateral to fully secure credit products. Under regulation, collateral eligible to secure new or renewed Advances includes:

one-to-four family loans (delinquent for no more than 60 days) and multi-family mortgage loans (delinquent for no more than 30 days) and securities representing such mortgages;
loans and securities issued and insured, or guaranteed by the U.S. government or any U.S. government agency (for example, mortgage-backed securities issued or guaranteed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, or Ginnie Mae);
cash or deposits in the FHLB;
certain other collateral that is real estate-related, provided that the collateral has a readily ascertainable value, can be reliably discounted to account for liquidation and other risks, can be liquidated in due course and the FHLB can perfect a security interest in it; and
certain qualifying securities representing undivided equity interests in eligible Advance collateral.

Residential mortgage loans are the principal form of collateral for Advances. The estimated value of the collateral required to secure each member's credit products is calculated by applying collateral discounts, or haircuts, to the value of the collateral. In addition, community financial institutions are eligible to utilize expanded statutory collateral provisions for small business and agribusiness loans. The FHLB's capital stock owned by its member borrowers is also pledged as collateral. Collateral arrangements and a member’s borrowing capacity vary based on the financial condition and performance of the institution, the types of collateral pledged and the overall quality of those assets. The FHLB can also require additional or substitute collateral to protect its security interest. The FHLB also has policies and procedures for validating the reasonableness of its collateral valuations and makes changes to its collateral guidelines, as necessary, based on current market conditions. In addition, collateral verifications and reviews are performed by the FHLB based on the risk profile of the borrower. Management of the FHLB believes that these policies effectively manage the FHLB's credit risk from Advances.

Members experiencing financial difficulties are subject to FHLB-performed “stress tests” of the impact of poorly performing assets on the member’s capital and loss reserve positions. Depending on the results of these tests and the level of over-collateralization, a member may be allowed to maintain pledged loan assets in its custody, may be required to deliver those loans into the custody of the FHLB or its agent, or may be required to provide details on those loans to facilitate an estimate of their fair value. The FHLB perfects its security interest in all pledged collateral. The FHLBank Act affords any security interest
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granted to the FHLB by a member priority over the claims or rights of any other party except for claims or rights of a third party that would otherwise be entitled to priority under applicable law and that are held by a bona fide purchaser for value or by a secured party holding a prior perfected security interest.

Using a risk-based approach, the FHLB considers the payment status, collateralization levels, and borrower's financial condition to be indicators of credit quality for its credit products. At March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, the FHLB did not have any Advances that were past due, in non-accrual status or considered impaired. In addition, there were no troubled debt restructurings related to Advances of the FHLB during the three months ended March 31, 2022 or 2021. At March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, the FHLB had rights to collateral on a member-by-member basis with an estimated value in excess of its outstanding extensions of credit.

Based upon the collateral held as security, its credit extension and collateral policies and the repayment history on Advances, the FHLB did not expect any credit losses on Advances as of March 31, 2022 and, therefore, no allowance for credit losses on Advances was recorded. For the same reasons, the FHLB did not record any allowance for credit losses on Advances at December 31, 2021.

Advance Concentrations

The FHLB's Advances are concentrated in commercial banks, savings institutions, and insurance companies. Advance borrower concentrations can change significantly because of members' ability to quickly increase or decrease their amount of Advances based on their current funding needs.

Table 4.5 - Borrowers Holding Five Percent or more of Total Advances, Including Any Known Affiliates that are Members of the FHLB (dollars in millions)
March 31, 2022 December 31, 2021
 Principal% of Total Principal Amount of Advances  Principal% of Total Principal Amount of Advances
U.S. Bank, N.A.$12,272 36 %U.S. Bank, N.A.$3,272 14 %
Third Federal Savings and Loan Association
3,553 11 
Third Federal Savings and Loan Association
3,179 14 
Nationwide Life Insurance Company2,748 Protective Life Insurance Company2,800 12 
Keybank National Association2,101 Nationwide Life Insurance Company2,702 12 
Protective Life Insurance Company2,000 Western-Southern Life Assurance Co.1,487 
Total$22,674 67 %Total$13,440 58 %


Note 5 - Mortgage Loans

Total mortgage loans held for portfolio represent residential mortgage loans under the Mortgage Purchase Program (MPP) that the FHLB's members originate, credit enhance, and then sell to the FHLB. The FHLB does not service any of these loans. The FHLB plans to retain its existing portfolio of mortgage loans.
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Table 5.1 - Mortgage Loans Held for Portfolio (in thousands)
 March 31, 2022December 31, 2021
Fixed rate medium-term single-family mortgage loans (1)
$620,070 $649,052 
Fixed rate long-term single-family mortgage loans6,759,239 6,752,858 
Total unpaid principal balance7,379,309 7,401,910 
Premiums165,972 168,993 
Discounts(1,093)(1,088)
Hedging basis adjustments (2)
11,507 18,602 
Total mortgage loans held for portfolio (3)
7,555,695 7,588,417 
Allowance for credit losses on mortgage loans(238)(233)
Mortgage loans held for portfolio, net
$7,555,457 $7,588,184 
(1)Medium-term is defined as a term of 15 years or less.
(2)Represents the unamortized balance of the mortgage purchase commitments' market values at the time of settlement. The market value of the commitment is included in the basis of the mortgage loan and amortized accordingly.
(3)Excludes accrued interest receivable of (in thousands) $22,622 and $22,847 at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021.

Table 5.2 - Mortgage Loans Held for Portfolio by Collateral/Guarantee Type (in thousands)
 March 31, 2022December 31, 2021
Conventional mortgage loans$7,248,017 $7,262,740 
Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgage loans131,292 139,170 
Total unpaid principal balance$7,379,309 $7,401,910 

Table 5.3 - Members, Including Any Known Affiliates that are Members of the FHLB, and Former Members Selling Five Percent or more of Total Unpaid Principal (dollars in millions)
 March 31, 2022 December 31, 2021
 Principal% of Total Principal% of Total
Union Savings Bank$1,827 25 %Union Savings Bank$1,841 25 %
FirstBank660 FirstBank565 
Guardian Savings Bank FSB486 Guardian Savings Bank FSB524 

Credit Risk Exposure

The FHLB manages credit risk exposure for conventional mortgage loans primarily though conservative underwriting and purchasing loans with characteristics consistent with favorable expected credit performance and by applying various credit enhancements.

Credit Enhancements. The conventional mortgage loans under the MPP are supported by some combination of credit enhancements (primary mortgage insurance (PMI), supplemental mortgage insurance (SMI) and the Lender Risk Account (LRA), including pooled LRA for those members participating in an aggregated MPP pool). These credit enhancements apply after a homeowner’s equity is exhausted. Beginning in February 2011, the FHLB discontinued the use of SMI for all new loan purchases and replaced it with expanded use of the LRA. The LRA is funded by the FHLB upfront as a portion of the purchase proceeds. The LRA is recorded in other liabilities in the Statement of Condition. Excess funds from the LRA are released to the member in accordance with the terms of the Master Commitment Contract, which is typically after five years, subject to performance of the related loan pool. The LRA established for a pool of loans is limited to only covering losses of that specific pool of loans. Because the FHA makes an explicit guarantee on FHA mortgage loans, the FHLB does not require any credit enhancements on these loans beyond primary mortgage insurance.

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Table 5.4 - Changes in the LRA (in thousands)
Three Months Ended
March 31, 2022
LRA at beginning of year$252,310 
Additions4,575 
Claims— 
Scheduled distributions(2,567)
LRA at end of period$254,318 

Payment Status of Mortgage Loans. The key credit quality indicator for conventional mortgage loans is payment status, which allows the FHLB to monitor borrower performance. Past due loans are those where the borrower has failed to make a full payment of principal and interest within one month of its due date. Table 5.5 presents the payment status of conventional mortgage loans.

Table 5.5 - Credit Quality Indicator of Conventional Mortgage Loans (in thousands)
March 31, 2022
Origination Year
Payment status, at amortized cost:Prior to 20182018 to March 31, 2022Total
Past due 30-59 days$18,145 $15,011 $33,156 
Past due 60-89 days5,333 2,692 8,025 
Past due 90 days or more11,758 7,278 19,036 
Total past due mortgage loans35,236 24,981 60,217 
Current mortgage loans2,726,555 4,636,595 7,363,150 
Total conventional mortgage loans$2,761,791 $4,661,576 $7,423,367 
December 31, 2021
Origination Year
Payment status, at amortized cost:Prior to 20172017 to 2021Total
Past due 30-59 days$16,105 $11,557 $27,662 
Past due 60-89 days3,703 2,533 6,236 
Past due 90 days or more12,185 11,623 23,808 
Total past due mortgage loans31,993 25,713 57,706 
Current mortgage loans2,542,107 4,848,339 7,390,446 
Total conventional mortgage loans$2,574,100 $4,874,052 $7,448,152 

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Other delinquency statistics include loans in process of foreclosure, serious delinquency rates, loans past due 90 days or more and still accruing interest, and non-accrual loans. Table 5.6 presents other delinquency statistics of mortgage loans.

Table 5.6 - Other Delinquency Statistics (dollars in thousands)
March 31, 2022
Amortized Cost:Conventional MPP LoansFHA LoansTotal
In process of foreclosure (1)
$5,465 $579 $6,044 
Serious delinquency rate (2)
0.26 %2.06 %0.29 %
Past due 90 days or more still accruing interest (3)
$18,261 $2,631 $20,892 
Loans on non-accrual status (4)
$1,689 $— $1,689 
December 31, 2021
Amortized Cost:Conventional MPP LoansFHA LoansTotal
In process of foreclosure (1)
$4,424 $501 $4,925 
Serious delinquency rate (2)
0.32 %2.00 %0.35 %
Past due 90 days or more still accruing interest (3)
$23,169 $2,812 $25,981 
Loans on non-accrual status (4)
$1,617 $— $1,617 
(1)Includes loans where the decision of foreclosure or a similar alternative such as pursuit of deed-in-lieu has been reported.
(2)Loans that are 90 days or more past due or in the process of foreclosure (including past due or current loans in the process of foreclosure) expressed as a percentage of the total loan portfolio class.
(3)Each conventional loan past due 90 days or more still accruing interest is on a schedule/scheduled monthly settlement basis and contains one or more credit enhancements. Loans that are well secured and in the process of collection as a result of remaining credit enhancements and schedule/scheduled settlement are not placed on non-accrual status.
(4)At March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, (in thousands) $1,689 and $1,617, respectively, of conventional MPP loans on non-accrual status do not have a related allowance because these loans were either previously charged off to their expected recoverable value and/or the fair value of the underlying collateral, including any credit enhancements, is greater than the amortized cost of the loans.

The FHLB did not have any real estate owned at March 31, 2022 or December 31, 2021.

Evaluation of Current Expected Credit Losses

Mortgage Loans - FHA. The FHLB invests in fixed-rate mortgage loans secured by one to four family residential properties insured by the FHA. The FHLB expects to recover any losses from such loans from the FHA. Any losses from these loans that are not recovered from the FHA would be caused by a claim rejection by the FHA and, as such, would be recoverable from the selling participating financial institutions. Therefore, the FHLB only has credit risk for these loans if the seller or servicer fails to pay for losses not covered by the FHA insurance, but in such instance, the FHLB would have recourse against the servicer for such failure. As a result, the FHLB did not record an allowance for credit losses on its FHA insured mortgage loans. Furthermore, due to the insurance, none of these mortgage loans have been placed on non-accrual status.

Mortgage Loans - Conventional MPP. Conventional loans are evaluated collectively when similar risk characteristics exist; loans that do not share risk characteristics with other pools are removed from the collective evaluation and evaluated for expected credit losses on an individual basis. For loans with similar risk characteristics, the FHLB determines the allowance for credit losses through analyses that include considering various loan portfolio and collateral-related characteristics, such as past performance, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts of expected economic conditions. The FHLB uses a model that employs a variety of methods, such as projected cash flows to estimate expected credit losses over the life of the loans. This model relies on a number of inputs, such as both current and forecasted property values and interest rates as well as historical borrower behavior experience. The FHLB’s calculation of expected credit losses includes a forecast of home prices over the entire contractual terms of its conventional loans rather than a reversion to historical home price trends after an initial forecast period. The FHLB also incorporates associated credit enhancements to determine estimated expected credit losses.

Certain conventional loans may be evaluated for credit losses by using the practical expedient for collateral dependent assets. A mortgage loan is considered collateral dependent when the borrower is experiencing financial difficulty and repayment is expected to be substantially through the sale of the underlying collateral. The FHLB may estimate the fair value of this
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collateral by either applying an appropriate loss severity rate, using third-party estimates, or using a property valuation model. The expected credit loss of a collateral dependent mortgage loan is equal to the difference between the amortized cost of the loan and the estimated fair value of the collateral, less estimated selling costs. The FHLB will either reserve for these estimated losses or record a direct charge-off of the loan balance, if certain triggering criteria are met. Expected recoveries of prior charge-offs, if any, are included in the allowance for credit losses.

The FHLB also assesses other qualitative factors in its estimation of loan losses for the collectively evaluated population. This amount represents a subjective management judgment, based on facts and circumstances that exist as of the reporting date, which is intended to cover other expected losses that may not otherwise be captured in the methodology described above.

Allowance for Credit Losses on Conventional Mortgage Loans. At March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021 the FHLB's allowance for credit losses on its conventional mortgage loans held for portfolio was (in thousands) $238 and $233, respectively.

Note 6 - Derivatives and Hedging Activities

Nature of Business Activity

The FHLB is exposed to interest rate risk primarily from the effect of changes in interest rates. The goal of the FHLB's interest-rate risk management strategy is not to eliminate interest-rate risk, but to manage it within appropriate limits. To mitigate the risk of loss, the FHLB has established policies and procedures, which include guidelines on the amount of exposure to interest rate changes it is willing to accept. In addition, the FHLB monitors the risk to its interest income, net interest margin and average maturity of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities. The FHLB uses derivatives when they are considered to be the most cost-effective alternative to achieve the FHLB's financial and risk management objectives. See Note 7 - Derivatives and Hedging Activities in the FHLB's 2021 Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information on the FHLB's derivative transactions.

The FHLB transacts its derivatives with large banks and major broker-dealers. Some of these banks and broker-dealers or their affiliates buy, sell, and distribute Consolidated Obligations. Derivative transactions may be executed either with a counterparty, referred to as uncleared derivatives, or cleared through a Futures Commission Merchant (i.e., clearing agent) with a Derivative Clearing Organization, referred to as cleared derivatives. Once a derivative transaction has been accepted for clearing by a Derivative Clearing Organization (Clearinghouse), the executing counterparty is replaced with the Clearinghouse. The FHLB is not a derivative dealer and does not trade derivatives for short-term profit.

Financial Statement Effect and Additional Financial Information

The notional amount of derivatives serves as a factor in determining periodic interest payments or cash flows received and paid. The notional amount reflects the FHLB's involvement in the various classes of financial instruments and represents neither the actual amounts exchanged nor the overall exposure of the FHLB to credit and market risk; the overall risk is much smaller. The risks of derivatives only can be measured meaningfully on a portfolio basis that takes into account the counterparties, the types of derivatives, the items being hedged and any offsets between the derivatives and the items being hedged.

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Table 6.1 summarizes the notional amount and fair value of derivative instruments and total derivative assets and liabilities. Total derivative assets and liabilities include the effect of netting adjustments and cash collateral. For purposes of this disclosure, the derivative values include the fair value of derivatives and the related accrued interest.

Table 6.1 - Fair Value of Derivative Instruments (in thousands)
 March 31, 2022
 Notional Amount of DerivativesDerivative AssetsDerivative Liabilities
Derivatives designated as fair value hedging instruments:   
Interest rate swaps$15,517,385 $2,055 $46,612 
Derivatives not designated as hedging instruments:   
Interest rate swaps15,389,664 3,177 6,580 
Interest rate swaptions436,000 1,620 — 
Mortgage delivery commitments75,447 770 
Total derivatives not designated as hedging instruments15,901,111 4,805 7,350 
Total derivatives before adjustments$31,418,496 6,860 53,962 
Netting adjustments and cash collateral (1)
 311,299 (52,196)
Total derivative assets and total derivative liabilities $318,159 $1,766 
 December 31, 2021
 Notional Amount of DerivativesDerivative AssetsDerivative Liabilities
Derivatives designated as fair value hedging instruments:   
Interest rate swaps$13,720,290 $710 $77,992 
Derivatives not designated as hedging instruments:
Interest rate swaps24,059,664 1,919 291 
Interest rate swaptions1,219,000 532 — 
Mortgage delivery commitments249,581 77 829 
Total derivatives not designated as hedging instruments25,528,245 2,528 1,120 
Total derivatives before adjustments$39,248,535 3,238 79,112 
Netting adjustments and cash collateral (1)
 294,498 (75,821)
Total derivative assets and total derivative liabilities $297,736 $3,291 
 
(1)Amounts represent the application of the netting requirements that allow the FHLB to settle positive and negative positions, and also cash collateral, including accrued interest, held or placed by the FHLB with the same clearing agent and/or counterparty. Cash collateral posted, including accrued interest, was (in thousands) $364,745 and $370,779 at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021. Cash collateral received, including accrued interest, was (in thousands) $1,250 and $460 at March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021.

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Table 6.2 presents the impact of qualifying fair value hedging relationships on net interest income as well as the total interest income (expense) by product.

Table 6.2 - Impact of Fair Value Hedging Relationships on Net Interest Income (in thousands)
 
Three Months Ended March 31, 2022
AdvancesAvailable-for-Sale SecuritiesConsolidated Bonds
Total interest income (expense) recorded in the Statements of Income
$45,318 $5,018 $(75,075)
Impact of Fair Value Hedging Relationships
Interest rate swaps:
Net interest settlements$(21,695)$(13,534)$416 
Gain (loss) on derivatives222,491 337,161 (10,779)
Gain (loss) on hedged items (220,175)(337,269)10,694 
Effect on net interest income$(19,379)$(13,642)$331 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2021
AdvancesAvailable-for-Sale SecuritiesConsolidated Bonds
Total interest income (expense) recorded in the Statements of Income
$41,160 $1,335 $(96,186)
Impact of Fair Value Hedging Relationships
Interest rate swaps:
Net interest settlements$(32,844)$(879)$251 
Gain (loss) on derivatives148,614 16,607 (375)
Gain (loss) on hedged items(144,809)(15,774)370 
Effect on net interest income$(29,039)$(46)$246 
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Table 6.3 presents the cumulative basis adjustments on hedged items designated as fair value hedges and the related amortized cost of the hedged items.

Table 6.3 - Cumulative Basis Adjustments for Fair Value Hedges (in thousands)
March 31, 2022
AdvancesAvailable-for-Sale SecuritiesConsolidated Bonds
Amortized cost of hedged asset or liability (1)
$7,757,634 $6,304,145 $792,611 
Fair value hedging adjustments
Basis adjustments for active hedging relationships included in amortized cost$(116,605)$(398,890)$(11,799)
Basis adjustments for discontinued hedging relationships included in amortized cost831 7,025 — 
Total amount of fair value hedging basis adjustments$(115,774)$(391,865)$(11,799)
December 31, 2021
AdvancesAvailable-for-Sale SecuritiesConsolidated Bonds
Amortized cost of hedged asset or liability (1)
$8,089,716 $5,238,549 $450,369 
Fair value hedging adjustments
Basis adjustments for active hedging relationships included in amortized cost$103,468 $(61,734)$(1,104)
Basis adjustments for discontinued hedging relationships included in amortized cost933 2,627 — 
Total amount of fair value hedging basis adjustments$104,401 $(59,107)$(1,104)
(1)     Includes only the portion of amortized cost representing the hedged items in fair value hedging relationships.

Table 6.4 presents net gains (losses) recorded in non-interest income (loss) on derivatives not designated as hedging instruments.

Table 6.4 - Net Gains (Losses) Recorded in Non-interest Income (Loss) on Derivatives Not Designated as Hedging Instruments (in thousands)
Three Months Ended March 31,
20222021
Derivatives not designated as hedging instruments:
Economic hedges:
Interest rate swaps$133,046 $140,780 
Interest rate swaptions1,088 3,789 
Net interest settlements(31,174)(44,208)
Mortgage delivery commitments(5,883)(3,264)
Total net gains (losses) related to derivatives not designated as hedging instruments
97,077 97,097 
Price alignment amount (1)
28 47 
Net gains (losses) on derivatives$97,105 $97,144 
(1)    This amount is for derivatives for which variation margin is characterized as a daily settled contract.

Credit Risk on Derivatives

The FHLB is subject to credit risk given the risk of non-performance by counterparties to its derivative transactions, and manages credit risk through credit analysis, collateral requirements and adherence to the requirements set forth in its policies, U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission regulations, and Finance Agency regulations.

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For uncleared derivatives, the degree of credit risk depends on the extent to which master netting arrangements are included in these contracts to mitigate the risk. The FHLB requires collateral agreements on its uncleared derivatives with the collateral delivery threshold set to zero.

For cleared derivatives, the Clearinghouse is the FHLB's counterparty. The Clearinghouse notifies the clearing agent of the required initial and variation margin and the clearing agent in turn notifies the FHLB. The FHLB utilizes two Clearinghouses for all cleared derivative transactions, LCH Ltd. and CME Clearing. At both Clearinghouses, variation margin is characterized as daily settlement payments, while initial margin is considered to be collateral. The requirement that the FHLB post initial and variation margin through the clearing agent, to the Clearinghouse, exposes the FHLB to credit risk if the clearing agent or the Clearinghouse fails to meet its obligations. The use of cleared derivatives is intended to mitigate credit risk exposure because a central counterparty is substituted for individual counterparties and collateral/payments for changes in the value of cleared derivatives is posted daily through a clearing agent. On the Statements of Cash Flows, the variation margin cash payments, or daily settlement payments, are included in net change in derivative and hedging activities, as an operating activity.

For cleared derivatives, the Clearinghouse determines initial margin requirements and generally credit ratings are not factored into the initial margin. However, clearing agents may require additional initial margin to be posted based on credit considerations, including, but not limited to, credit rating downgrades. At March 31, 2022, the FHLB was not required to post additional initial margin by its clearing agents based on credit considerations.

Offsetting of Derivative Assets and Derivative Liabilities

The FHLB presents derivative instruments, related cash collateral received or pledged, and associated accrued interest, on a net basis by clearing agent and/or by counterparty when it has met the netting requirements.

The FHLB has analyzed the enforceability of offsetting rights incorporated in its cleared derivative transactions, and it expects that the exercise of those offsetting rights by a non-defaulting party under these transactions would be upheld under applicable law upon an event of default including bankruptcy, insolvency, or similar proceeding involving the Clearinghouse or the FHLB's clearing agent, or both. Based on this analysis, the FHLB presents a net derivative receivable or payable for all of its transactions through a particular clearing agent with a particular Clearinghouse.

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Table 6.5 presents separately the fair value of derivative instruments meeting or not meeting netting requirements, including the related collateral. At March 31, 2022 and December 31, 2021, the FHLB did not receive or pledge any non-cash collateral. Any over-collateralization under an individual clearing agent and/or counterparty level is not included in the determination of the net unsecured amount.

Table 6.5 - Offsetting of Derivative Assets and Derivative Liabilities (in thousands)
March 31, 2022
Derivative Instruments Meeting Netting Requirements
Gross Recognized AmountGross Amount of Netting Adjustments and Cash Collateral
Derivative Instruments Not Meeting Netting Requirements (1)
Total Derivative Assets and Total Derivative Liabilities
Derivative Assets:
Uncleared$5,331 $(4,059)$$1,280 
Cleared1,521 315,358 — 316,879 
Total$318,159 
Derivative Liabilities:
Uncleared$41,211 $(40,215)$770 $1,766 
Cleared11,981 (11,981)— — 
Total$1,766 
December 31, 2021
Derivative Instruments Meeting Netting Requirements
Gross Recognized AmountGross Amount of Netting Adjustments and Cash Collateral
Derivative Instruments Not Meeting Netting Requirements (1)
Total Derivative Assets and Total Derivative Liabilities
Derivative Assets:
Uncleared$1,892 $(1,748)$77 $221 
Cleared1,269 296,246 — 297,515 
Total$297,736 
Derivative Liabilities:
Uncleared$77,126 $(74,664)$829 $3,291 
Cleared1,157 (1,157)— — 
Total$3,291 
(1)    Represents mortgage delivery commitments that are not subject to an enforceable netting agreement.


Note 7 - Consolidated Obligations

Table 7.1 - Consolidated Discount Notes Outstanding (dollars in thousands)
 Carrying Value Principal Amount 
Weighted Average Interest Rate (1)
March 31, 2022$31,650,657  $31,672,068  0.23 %
December 31, 2021$29,837,696  $29,843,992  0.05 %
(1)Represents an implied rate without consideration of concessions.

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Table 7.2 - Consolidated Bonds Outstanding by Original Contractual Maturity (dollars in thousands)
 March 31, 2022 December 31, 2021
Year of Original Contractual MaturityAmountWeighted Average Interest Rate AmountWeighted Average Interest Rate
Due in 1 year or less$27,622,830 0.45 % $12,828,885 0.55 %
Due after 1 year through 2 years3,567,175 1.92  3,836,120 1.91 
Due after 2 years through 3 years1,972,405 2.14  1,724,405 2.23 
Due after 3 years through 4 years2,090,000 1.54  2,095,000 1.39 
Due after 4 years through 5 years1,161,000 1.86  870,000 1.86 
Thereafter